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Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, ON
Joined: 07/10/2006
Posts: 129
Beginner questions

I know the land very well, I can find my way around the property in the dark so there aren't any problems there. I'm not sure yet were I will set up stands. My neighbour asked earlier this year if he could build a stand in a certain spot, and I said he could, so I think one there. I will probably talk to him about different locations, he also knows the land quite well.
As far as numbers, my neighbour said he sees atleast 6 each day during the season (on his property) and there is no end of tracks around my property. I also have access to all the stands on his property (I think about 4). Any advice on stand placement would be appreciated, I'm thinking where the forest meets the grain field. The only catch is there is an electric fence running the premiter (turned off) with only a couple breaks.

thanks for all the help

redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2589
Beginner questions

Sounds awesome! You're definitely on the right track. Are you able to scout the grain field without disturbing much? Maybe get a good idea where they are entering / exiting. What type of crop is planted right now? Are you able to scout along the creek? Lots of times when I check out a new location I go up and down through the creek to find "highway" crossings. You can't miss them. They'll be paths that have been used year after year, and they will be worn down into the creek bank. I then will track these paths and find out what they are doing. Where they bed, where they are entering fields, what other areas they are using for feed, staging areas, and so forth. For your first year hunting I would say close to that field will be best. You'll get a good feel for what's going on, and gain useful knowledge for future hunts Thumbs up What are your expectations for this year?
Any deer that shows up, a buck , a monster buck? Also be sure to use the wind in your favor when picking a sight. You don't want to be sitting in a spot that will blow your scent into their bedroom. Pick several spots so no matter which way the wind blows you'll be safe.

Unless that fence is 8 strands and 6 foot tall I don't see why it would effect their movement.

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Location: Louisiana
Joined: 06/29/2006
Posts: 46
Beginner questions

Welcome to the forum!

I think you have had enough suggestions from some good people on guns and caliber, I will let that one rest!

Congrats on the land! I envy you!
I will be in Ontario in November hunting near Dyers, northwest of Thunderbay during the rut.

You definetly are in some GREAT DEER COUNTRY!

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Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, ON
Joined: 07/10/2006
Posts: 129
Beginner questions

Thanks for all the great replies. I can scout parts of the creek, there are very active beavers and their trails seem to be used by the deer too. The field has 'mixed grain' on one part and hay on the other, the fence around the field is a standard height 2 line electric fence, which is off. As for expectations, I don't know what to expect. I know this is a skill that is developed over many years and knowing the standard size of deer in the area. I was told in that area I can be selective, but there is always a hint of doubt. I will probably just judge based on the bulk and rack of the animal and go with a gut instinct of size. and if I don't see a single buck I will still enjoy the time in the woods.
thanks for all the help

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Location: Virginia
Joined: 07/27/2006
Posts: 27
Beginner questions

Hey bud. Welcome to BGH. I too am new here and am really enjoying the advice, pics, and stories. Heres my two cents. On stand placement make sure to leave yourself options win it comes to wind direction. On some of my favorite spots I have two stands in the same area. giving myself choices when it comes to wind direction. As for dragging the Hoss out. cheap sounds like better so I really like the idea of just making urself a cart. I just carry around a dog leash with a handle on the end and clip it around the neck. Dont know if your property has been hunted hard. But if not use caution going in and out to your stands. Deer that are not used to humans and a lot of activity spook easy.As for rifles, Im a flat lander here in Virginia so Sorry not much help there. I do prefer on my muzzleloader to have both open sights and a scope. Fiber optic sights are good for close shots near dusk when its hard to get that last bit of light in the scope. Anyhow I am by no means a pro at this. But I hope some of this info helps. take care Hoss and good luck to you. I look foward to some great pics.

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Location: St. Louis County
Joined: 01/10/2006
Posts: 337
Beginner questions

I think your best bet would be to hire a coupla guys say, from Illinois or Kansas to come up and hunt it for you. That way they could give you some really good feedback on where to hunt next year.

Heck, we'd..er, I mean "those guys" could give you invaluable hunting tips, field dressing and skinning techniques, scouting tips, etc. I'm sure the cost to you would be a pretty good chunk, but really you could look at it as an investment.

-Dave

redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2589
Beginner questions

Pure Brilliance Mr. Cool! Best idea I've ever heard Thumbs up

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Location: Kitchener-Waterloo, ON
Joined: 07/10/2006
Posts: 129
Beginner questions

One more question I thought of. After field dressing a deer (assuming of course I get one) I think I'm probably not up to butchering it myself so I will probably take it to a packers. First question is how do I pick one? is there anything I need to know about them, if anyone knows of any good ones in my area a reccomendation would be great. Also what condition would they be expecting it in ( skinned? just field dressed? ect...) and what do they usually charge?

Thanks for all the help

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3213
Beginner questions

I don't know about where you live, but we have a grocery store in Madras that cuts and wraps. Not real hard to do it your self. Bone it allout and cool it in the fridge a few days, makes the meat stand up well to cut. Then if it looks like a steak, it's a steak. If it looks like stew meat, stew meat and if it looks like hamburger, it is! I worried about it a lot when I first started but finally figured out it's all meat! Cut out the steaks across the grain. Never met a deer rib I liked but boil the meat down and it makes great sloppy Joes. When you do the cutting, it can be anything you say it is. I like cutting and wrapping.

redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2589
Beginner questions

It is rewarding to do your own, and you know exactly what you got . I think most the time the butcher weighs your meat, throws it in a grinder with the 10 guys before you and the 10 guys behind you and mix it all together, and then give you back what you weighed in.
Being new to it you may chose to have it done, so I would check out the closest places to you and ask if you get your deer meat back, make sure they cut all the meat off. I've known some butchers to take some shortcuts and you end up with a lot less meat. The cost I'm sure ranges but around here it runs about $65 for the processing, which includes cuts of meat and ground meat. You will pay extra if you have them make smoked sticks, jerkey, sausage,etc. I also know most of them prefer to have it brought in as soon as possible with the skin on and field dressed. Of course that's what they do around here. Find your butcher in advance and find out what he wants. Good Luck and Have Fun Thumbs up

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