Washington Hunting News

Washington Wolves Still Protected by State Laws

Although wolves have been removed from federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection in the eastern third of Washington state, they remain protected as a state endangered species throughout Washington.

Under Congressional direction that prevents any judicial review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has removed the northern Rocky Mountain population of gray wolves from federal endangered status. The action affects wolves in Montana, Idaho, the eastern third of Oregon and Washington and a small area of north central Utah.

Delisting of Wolves in 8 States Begins

On the heels of legislation passed last month with the support of the Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus (CSC) as part of the FY 2011 budget agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced this week that it is lifting Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for 5,500 grey wolves in eight states in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes and has published a proposed rule to remove gray wolves from ESA designation in the Western Great Lakes.

Washington Special Hunt Permits Application Deadline May 18th

Hunters have through May 18 to apply for special hunting permits for fall deer, elk, mountain goat, moose, bighorn sheep, and turkey seasons in Washington state.

Permit winners will be selected by random drawing conducted by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) in late June. The special permits qualify hunters to hunt at times and places beyond those authorized by a general hunting license.

Montana Wildlife Officials Applaud Congressional Wolf Measure

Montana wildlife officials heaped praise on U.S. Senator Jon Tester as a Congressional measure he helped craft removed gray wolves from the list of threatened and endangered species in Montana, Idaho, and parts of Oregon, Washington and Utah.

Washington FWC Meeting April 8-9

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is scheduled to take action on a variety of new hunting rules at a public meeting April 8-9 in Olympia.

The commission, which sets policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), will meet both days in room 172 of the Natural Resource Building, 1111 Washington St. S.E. in Olympia. The meeting will start at 8:30 a.m. both days.

Poaching Tip in Washington Leads to Guilty Plea and Charges in Other Cases

A Kennewick man has pleaded guilty to charges of illegal big-game hunting in the Blue Mountains of Columbia County following an investigation by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Jason Locke, 37, pleaded guilty March 9 in Columbia County District Court to poaching a bull elk and using a hunting license illegally. Locke was fined a total of $11,345, including a $6,000 criminal wildlife assessment penalty for taking a trophy-size bull elk.

Cause of Washington Wolf Death Unclear

The exact cause of death for the Imnaha wolf found dead in early March is unclear.

Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory ran several tests on the carcass looking for injuries, disease and toxins but test results did not point to a specific cause of death.

The only abnormal finding was some internal hemorrhage in the wolf's chest cavity. Forensic analysis did not point to a clear cause of the hemorrhage but biologists believe the hemorrhage may have contributed to the wolf's death.

Washington FWC Hears 2011-12 Hunt Proposals

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission heard public input on proposed 2011-12 hunting season rules, adopted amendments to Puget Sound recreational clam and oyster seasons and approved three land transactions during its March 4-5 meeting in Spokane.

The proposed 2011-12 hunting season rules will be considered for final adoption at the commission's April meeting in Olympia. The hunt proposals include:

Landowner hunting permits to increase deer and elk hunters access to private lands in Asotin County.

Washington Hunters Can Apply for Multiple Season Permits Before March 31st

Deer and elk hunters have until March 31 to enter their name in a drawing for a 2011 multiple-season permit, which can greatly increase their opportunities for success in the field.

In early April, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will randomly draw names for 4,000 multiple-season deer permits and 850 multiple-season elk permits.

Washington Spring Black Bear Applications Due March 10th

Hunters may now purchase and submit applications for a 2011 spring black bear hunting permit, applicable to specific areas of western and eastern Washington.

To be eligible for a permit, hunters must purchase and submit an application to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) by midnight March 10.