Vermont FWD to Hold Meetings on Deer and Moose Regulation Changes

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The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board will hold three public hearings on January 3, 4 and 5 to discuss proposed changes to deer and moose hunting regulations.

"The public is encouraged to attend to learn more about these proposals and to provide their input," said Vermont Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Wayne Laroche. "They also can read the current wording of the proposed regulations by going to the Vermont Fish and Wildlife website."

Proposals for Deer Hunting Muzzleloader deer hunting would include a new four-day antlerless-only season starting the Thursday following Columbus Day, the second Monday in October, when a person with an antlerless permit could take antlerless deer by muzzleloader. The existing nine-day December muzzleloader deer season starting the first Saturday after the rifle season would remain unchanged. Antlerless deer permits would be valid for both October and December muzzleloader hunting.

Archery deer hunting would be allowed October 1 through 31 except for the four days of the October antlerless muzzleloader season. The existing nine days of archery deer hunting in December, starting the first Saturday after the rifle season would remain unchanged. Up to three deer, only one of which could be a legal buck, would be allowed during the split archery deer hunting season. During archery season, a hunter would be allowed to take one legal buck anywhere in the state and antlerless deer in specific Wildlife Management Units if allowed annually by the Board.

The annual limit of three deer, TWO of which may be LEGAL BUCKS, would remain in effect for archery, youth, rifle and muzzleloader deer hunting seasons.

Proposals for Moose Hunting An archery moose hunting season is proposed for seven days starting the first Saturday in October when a moose of either sex may be taken. Fifty hunting permits would be allowed annually in the same Wildlife Management Units as for the regular moose season.

The regular moose hunting season for taking a moose of either sex by firearms or archery would be for six days starting the third Saturday in October.

Two separate lotteries for moose hunting permits would be held, one for each season.

Regulations and Hearings The new proposed deer and moose regulations are posted on Vermont Fish and Wildlife's website www.vtfishandwildlife.com. Click on "About Us" on the left, and then "Fish and Wildlife Board" to see the wording of the regulations.

Three public hearings are scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. as follows: Monday, January 3 – Education Center, Kehoe Conservation Camp, 636 Point of Pines Road, Castleton, Vt

Tuesday, January 4 – Pavilion Auditorium, 109 State Street, Montpelier, Vt

Wednesday, January 5 – Dibden Auditorium, Johnson State College, 337 College Hill, Johnson, Vt

Comments

gatorfan's picture

I'm surprised Sean hasn't

I'm surprised Sean hasn't commented on this yet!

I'm sure this might open up some more opportunites for him to get back home to hunt with his Dad.

This part is a little confusing though (maybe one of the California wardens has joined the Vermont FWB):

Up to three deer, only one of which could be a legal buck, would be allowed during the split archery deer hunting season. During archery season, a hunter would be allowed to take one legal buck anywhere in the state and antlerless deer in specific Wildlife Management Units if allowed annually by the Board.

and then:

The annual limit of three deer, TWO of which may be LEGAL BUCKS, would remain in effect for archery, youth, rifle and muzzleloader deer hunting seasons.

SimonG's picture

3 deer total. 2 MAX. may be

3 deer total.

2 MAX. may be bucks.

1 buck can be taken in archery.

SimonG's picture

VT fish and wildlife board

VT fish and wildlife board voted to NOT increase the Archery Season length.

Also Voted to NOT have an October muzzleloader season

The feeling was that increasing anymore October hunting seasons is a bad idea because it makes tourists and those who use the outdoors that are not hunters unhappy.

the feeling was and is that the majority of people coming to Vermont canoe, kayak, bird watch etc and are not going to want their time outdoors ruined by hunting and also fear of negative impact on rifle season...as Senator Leahy said when they created more Wilderness areas on public land in Vermont, they are" more concerned with the 70 million people that live near by and may visit Vermont versus a few rednecks who want to road hunt."

THe final decision and last vote is Feb 16th, 2011

http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com/about_board.cfm

A 7 day archery only moose hunt was approved to go to final vote, the restrictions are that the moose and the hunter both need to be at least 100 yards from any road, or trail, no ATV use is allowed to retrieve the moose unless oin private land, and archery regulations for equipment already on the books for moose season will be in effect.

no word on the proposed 6 points minimum for bucks.