Vermont to Discuss Moose Hunting Permit Allocations

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The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board will hold two public hearings next week to discuss the 2011 allocation of moose hunting permits.

The meetings will be held Monday, May 2, at the Brighton Town Hall, 49 Mill Street Extension, in Island Pond and Thursday, May 5 in the Spaulding High School auditorium, 155 Ayers Street, in Barre. Both hearings start at 7 p.m.

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department has proposed 405 moose hunting permits be issued for the regular Oct. 15-20 moose season and 50 permits for the Oct. 1-7 archery moose season. That represents a significant reduction from permits awarded in recent years, but fewer permits are needed now because management objectives have been met for moose as laid out in state’s 10-year Big Game Management Plan.

"We've had to be really proactive in reducing the number of moose on the landscape through the issuance of permits in the past few years," said Cedric Alexander, the lead biologist for Vermont’s moose management team. "In parts of the Northeast Kingdom there were simply too many moose, and we had to issue high numbers of permits to reduce the moose herd and be ecologically responsible."

Alexander said that although the era of issuing high numbers of permits is over, moose still occur in higher numbers throughout Vermont compared to a decade ago.

"Comparing biological data from 2009 to 2010 on moose in the Northeast Kingdom, we observed healthier yearling (one and one-half year old) bulls, weighing on average 17 more pounds," added Alexander. "In addition, another important health index – ovulation rates of prime-aged cow moose – increased."

"That we're issuing fewer permits in 2011 than in recent years is good news," said Alexander. "It means we are where we need to be in terms of moose management."

The 2010 Vermont Moose Harvest Report with details on last year's hunt, including the towns where moose were taken, is on Fish and Wildlife’s website. Look under "Hunting and Trapping" and then "Big Game."

Applications for moose hunting permits are available on the department's Web site www.vtfishandwildlife.com. The deadline for applying is June 3, 2011.

Comments

groovy mike's picture

455 moose hunting permits are far less than recent years permits

I didn’t see this announcement until after the public hearing meetings had taken place.  I don’t know as there would have been any point in attending anyhow by the sounds of this article the state of Vermont's Fish and Wildlife Board had already decided what to do even before they held the two public hearings to discuss the 2011 allocation of moose hunting permits.

455 moose hunting permits are far less than the numbers of permits awarded in recent years.  I suppose it is good that the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board feels that their moose herd management objectives have been met per Vermont state’s 10-year Big Game Management Plan, and I applaud their choosing hunting as the most effective and ecologically responsible means of reducing the number of moose in the Northeast Kingdom.  But it is sad news to me as a potential future moose hunter that the era of issuing high numbers of permits is over. 

I still have hope of drawing in the future though.  If moose still occur in higher numbers than a decade ago throughout Vermont then there is hope that the number of permits issued will be increased again.  I took my moose in 2009, so I can not even apply in the state of Vermont until 2013.  Perhaps the herd populations will rebound and climb during the next few years of lower hunting pressure.  Ideally we could have light winters and low calf mortality rates so that when I am able to apply for a moose hunting permit in Vermont again the population will be high, the number of permits increased again, and the odds of success good.  Hey – I can dream can’t I?  In any case, thanks for sharing the information.  I am always interested in anything related to moose hunting, but especially in the northeastern region of the United States (the state of Vermont, the state of Maine, and the state of New Hampshire – and maybe someday New York State too!) and eastern Canada (Quebec, Labrador, New Foundland, and Nova Scotia provinces).

 Mike