Three Iowa Men Face Fines of Over $100,000 for Poaching

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Three southeast Iowa men face more than $100,000 in fines for their roles in poaching trophy deer and multiple counts of commercialization of wildlife in Jefferson, Van Buren and Henry counties.

State Conservation Officer Chris Flynn said the investigation, that had been underway for several years, began from complaints called in by hunters, landowners and concerned citizens.

Flynn said due to the nature of the case and the alleged activities of the individuals, officers had to file charges in three counties.

"The investigation is continuing and we anticipate more arrests in the case," Flynn said.

Those charged on Wednesday include Brad Johnson, 38, of Fairfield, who was charged with four counts of unlawful commercialization of wildlife which are serious misdemeanors, unlawful taking of antlered deer, unlawful transportation of deer, unlawful taking of turkey and other wildlife related charges. Johnson was charged in Jefferson and in Van Buren counties. He faces $51,302.50 in fines and liquidated damages.

Shae McCabe, 32, of Fairfield, was charged with unlawful taking of antlered deer, abandonment of wildlife, two counts of unlawful commercialization of wildlife which are serious misdemeanors, unlawful taking of turkey and other wildlife related charges. He faces $31,328.50 in fines and liquidated damages.

Southep Souchanh, 38, of Mount Pleasant, was charged with unlawful possession of deer and 145 counts of unlawful possession of squirrels. He faces $25,932.50 in fines and liquidated damages.

Flynn said officers served a search warrant on the Johnson and McCabe residents on Dec. 9. The evidence collected includes multiple trophy class deer allegedly illegally harvested and sold.

Flynn led the investigation that included more than 20 additional conservation officers and officers with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Comments

deerhunter30's picture

These people should be made

These people should be made to clean up campgrounds and any public grounds that need it. These people really do make us look bad. This is why people think that hunting should not be a sport, but if the rules are followed it all works out.

Its nice to see that are contributions to hunting are being answered by catching these people who don't pay or care about anything to do with hunting.

Ca_Vermonster's picture

Well, they "face" fines of

Well, they "face" fines of $100,000, but will they actually get them for that???

I hope so.  Another sad case of the average hunter getting punched int he gut twice.  Once by them taking away game that could have been harvested legally by hunters, and once by making the average hunter look bad.

Glad to see the U.S. F&W involved.  i am assuming that is for the "sale" part of the trophies, especially if it was done online or across state lines.  Hit them with some federal charges!!!

jaybe's picture

Whoa! Those boys must have

Whoa! Those boys must have been into doing this for some time to get that many people involved in the investigation!

And that one feller must have been a pretty good squirrel hunter to have 145 counts against him.

I was talking to a friend on the phone as I was reading this, and he said, "Oh no! You can give that stuff away, but don't be selliing it!".

I'm really glad when I hear of these kinds of people getting caught and fined, but it always makes me sad that it takes so much investigative work, documentation and all else just to arrest three guys. Can you imagine how much that cost the Fish and Game Department? That money could have been used in such better ways than chasing down these crooks. Hopefully, they will actually pay their fines and it will replenish a portion of what was spent.