New Wolf Pack in Snake River Unit; Walla Walla Wolf Collared in Oregon

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A new wolf pack is using the Snake River wildlife management unit of northeast Oregon, which borders Idaho and includes the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and Wilderness.

ODFW surveyed the area last week, after receiving reports and trail camera photographs from hunters indicating wolves were in the area. Tracks from at least five different wolves were documented on Thursday. Though the photographs provided to ODFW indicate that at least one pup was produced in this area, the new pack will not be considered a “breeding pair” unless two or more pups are documented in December. 

ODFW encourages hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts to report wolf sightings using the online reporting system or by phone. “These public wolf reports from Oregon’s outdoor enthusiasts really help us target our survey efforts and make the best use of limited resources.” said Russ Morgan, ODFW wolf program coordinator.

The confirmation of the Snake River pack marks the fourth wolf pack confirmed in Oregon since the mid-2000s, when wolves began returning to the state from Idaho.

Last Friday, ODFW radio-collared its first wolf from the Walla Walla pack in Umatilla County (OR-10, or the tenth wolf collared in the state). This pack was first documented in January 2011 and is near the Washington border. The female pup collared weighed 48 pounds and appeared to be in excellent health. She was released unharmed.

While ODFW wolf program staff out of ODFW’s La Grande office assisted with the immobilization and radio-collaring of the wolf, district staff from the Pendleton field office were responsible for the wolf’s capture. “We’ve known about the Walla Walla pack since January and at least two pups since summer, but the collar will make it much easier to document the pack’s size and get a sense of the pack’s movements,” said Mark Kirsch, ODFW district wildlife biologist in Pendleton.

“As wolves expand their range in Oregon, more work will be handled by our district staff,” noted Russ Morgan. “Livestock producers and others are encouraged to work directly with district staff as they do for other wildlife in their area.”

In other wolf-related developments, two wolves from the Imnaha Pack of Wallowa County have dispersed to central Oregon.

OR-7 was last documented in northern Lake County. He was born in northeast Oregon (Imnaha pack) and was collared on Feb. 25, 2011. GPS collar data shows that this wolf left the Imnaha pack territory on Sept. 10, 2011. Since then he has visited six counties (Baker, Grant, Harney, Crook, Deschutes and now Lake). ODFW and USFWS will continue to monitor OR-7’s location data. At this point, it is unknown if he will continue to disperse or settle down in central Oregon.

OR-3 was also last located in central Oregon. OR-3 was born in northeast Oregon (Imnaha pack) and radio collared on Feb. 12, 2010.  He is a three-year-old male and dispersed from the pack in May.  He has a VHF radio collar which does not allow for continuous tracking. OR-3 has been monitored by ODFW and USFWS using periodic aerial flights.  He was discovered in Wheeler County in July and was later located in the Ochoco Mountains on Sept. 29.  Since that time he has not been found.  The USFWS and ODFW will continue to attempt to locate this wolf.

It is very natural for wolves to disperse away from their birth area. Counting the two wolves in central Oregon, a total of four radio-collared wolves from northeast Oregon have dispersed away from their home pack (the Imnaha). One travelled to Washington last winter and has not been located since. Another dispersed to Idaho and continues to be in that state. 

Wolves throughout Oregon are protected by the state Endangered Species Act (ESA). West of Hwys 395-78-95, they are also protected by the federal ESA. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the lead management agency for wolves west of this boundary.

For more information on wolves in Oregon

Comments

Retired2hunt's picture

  I feel the definite right

 

I feel the definite right thing to do here is continue to trap these wolves and get RF collars on them so their "progress" can be closely monitored.

I definitely agree with numbmutz in saying as the population of wolves grows within Oregon there is another animal that may have far greater decreases in existance - deer and elk most likely being the prey.

What is just as interesting in this article is the link from the ODFW web site on the court order stay that was granted to stop the elimination of two other wolves from this same original pack.  I would hope the court eventually finds that the ODFW knows what they are doing with problem animals and allows them to carry out their management of these wild animals.

 

numbnutz's picture

Another pack? Really? It

Another pack? Really? It seems like every month there's a new article of a new wolf found or a new pack or wolfs spreading in to new areas. Although we don't  have the same problems like the Rockie mountain states we are now getting a signifagent amount of wolf activity. It will be just a matter of time before our elk and deer will be gone fron NE Oregon. They have to compete with a huge lion and bear population and now a fast growing wolf population. I hope the ODFW is coming up with a good plan to manageing the wolfs and fast.