Montana Hunting News

Mentoring Young Hunters

Taking Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Hunter Education course with a child or spouse is one way to set the stage for a lasting family hunting partnership.

Some parents may start even earlier with backpacking and camping trips, big game scouting trips and other good excuses to have fun in the outdoors while teaching young people the basic skills they will need as hunters and outdoor enthusiasts. Montana's general deer and elk hunting season closes Nov. 28, the general pheasant season closes Jan. 1.

Montana's Warm Weather Slows Hunt Success

The second weekend of the 2010 general big-game season was warm and clear in south central Montana– not ideal conditions for fall hunting success.

Fewer than a third of hunters who stopped at four south central Montana check stations operated by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks over the Halloween weekend had harvested game. For the two weekends, the success rate was just 30 percent, well below the long-term average.

Montana Seeks Comments on Removal of 12 Wolves

Montana wildlife officials are seeking comment on a request that would allow the state to remove up to 12 wolves from the West Fork of the Bitterroot River drainage in southwestern Montana.

RMEF and Other Groups Urge Montana to Stop Wolf Negotiations

In a letter to Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Director Joe Maurier, conservation organizations are urging state officials to stick with science in determining adequate populations of gray wolves, rather than negotiating with environmental and animal rights groups to allow surplus populations.

The agency is currently negotiating a settlement with the 13 groups who sued to keep gray wolves federally protected under the Endangered Species Act.

Montana FWP Commission Discusses Application for Wolf Take Permit

Montana's Fish, Wildlife & Parks Commission met Oct. 7 at the FWP Helena Headquarters.

The business meeting included final decisions on the donation of a 160-acre in holding at Makoshika State Park in Glendive; 2011 fishing regulation changes, acquisition of a conservation easement on lands in the west Swan Valley; adjustments to elk plan objectives; land acquisitions in FWP Regions 1 and 3, and a 4,900-acre conservation easement on the Moline Ranch near Geraldine in Chouteau County.

Montana Offers New Hunting Opportunities in 2010

Montana's deer, elk and antelope regulations—the hunter's bible—is newly formatted this year and includes some new hunting opportunities for deer, elk and antelope for the upcoming season.

"We made the changes in response to requests for simpler, easier to read hunting regulations," said Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks spokesman Ron Aasheim.

Montana Black Bear Season Begins Soon

The fall black bear hunting season begins Sept. 15 in most areas of Montana. The archery season for black bear begins Sept. 4. All hunters should check the regulations for season date exceptions.

Montana Will Appeal Wolf Ruling

Montana's top wildlife official confirmed that his agency will appeal the recent district court ruling that returned the region's recovered wolves to the federal endangered species list.

Joe Maurier, director of Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, told a coalition of wildlife conservation and livestock groups that Montana has "a recovered wolf population and we will appeal."

Montana Asks Outdoorsmen For Help With Wolf Sightings

State wildlife officials remind landowners, hikers, anglers, OHV riders and others in the outdoors that they can help Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to monitor wolves this autumn by using the Internet.

"Over the past several years, we've depended on hunters, landowners, and many others who spend time outdoors to be an important source of wolf-related information," said Ken McDonald, chief of the wildlife bureau for FWP in Helena.

Montana Joins Federal Lawsuit on Wolves

Following the recent district court ruling that returned the region's wolves to the endangered species list, state wildlife officials continue to press federal authorities to provide management options that would bring the wolf population in balance with other wildlife and the people who live and work in Montana.