Hunters Encouraged to Harvest Does

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Oklahoma's deer herd continues to grow and biologists with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation believe the only way to manage for a healthier, balanced herd is to harvest more antlerless deer.

Outdoor Oklahoma will highlight new regulations that will affect the state's deer seasons and the reasons behind those regulations when "Hunters in the Know Take a Doe," airs Oct. 28 on OETA.

"The Department knows that many of the state's deer hunters still have a strong buck preference," said Rich Fuller, information supervisor with the Department. "But, unprecedented regulations are in place to allow hunters more opportunity than ever to harvest a doe. This show provides insight into the importance of antlerless harvest and we hope it will encourage more hunters to consider taking a doe. It's the right thing to do."

Outdoor Oklahoma features such topics as fishing, hunting, and wildlife management. The 30-minute program is produced by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, and can be seen at 6 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. Sunday on OETA. It also airs Mondays at 5:30 p.m., Thursdays at 10:30 p.m. and each Saturday at 1:30 p.m. on KSBI.

For a complete listing of show times and channels in your viewing area, consult the Department's Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com or your local TV guide.

Comments

hunter25's picture

Although I know

Although I know overpopulation can be a big problem it;s great to see when a states herd is doing so well that hunters have to be pushed to harvest more does. Many hunters seem to not want to fill those tags but as far as I'm concerned the more they give me the more great hours I get to enjoy in the outdoors and more happy friends when I get home with the meat. I've hunted Oklahoma only once and did not get anything just one year after this article was written but I still had a great time and look forward to going back again in the future and hunting with my friend on his old family farm.