Any-Deer Permit Increases Recommended

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After reviewing data associated with last year's deer harvest and combining it with population objectives designed by the public, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife biologists have recommended an increase in the number of Any-Deer permits for the 2002 season.

Through these permit recommendations, the department wants to reduce or stabilize deer populations in the central, southern and coastal part of the state, and increase the deer population in the northern and eastern part of the state. To accomplish that, the department is proposing an increase in the number of Any-Deer permits available to hunters in 21 of the 30 wildlife management districts (WMD) in the state, and in eight WMDs in northern and eastern Maine, no permits will issued for the second straight year.

This year, IFW is recommending 76,575 any-deer permits. This is subject to approval by the Commissioner's Advisory Council. The permit numbers are in line with the 75,000 permits recommended in 2000, and it is an increase by 22,000 from the 54,406 permits issued last year.

The number of permits and what WMD they are issued in are listed below:
1 - 0
2 - 0
3 - 0
4 - 0
5 - 0
6 - 0
7 - 150
8 - 350
9 - 100
10 - 300
11 - 250
12 - 1,250
13 - 1,600
14 - 300
15 - 3,450
16 - 7,200
17 - 13,350
18 - 300
19 - 0
20 - 3,850
21 - 5,250
22 - 6,900
23 - 18,150
24 - 3,400
25 - 4,450
26 - 4,900
27 - 200
28 - 0
29 - 25
30 - 850

The department uses the Any-Deer permit system to manage the white-taileddeer population in the state. By controlling the harvest of female deer in 30 regional wildlife management districts throughout the state, biologists can manage population trends.

Maine's wintering population of deer this past year was estimated at 241,500 deer in 2001. Since December 2000, the statewide herd has declined by roughly 50,000 deer (18%) due to the effects of the severe 2001 winter. Last year's winter losses of deer were greatest in the spruce-fir zone of Maine (eastern, western, and northern WMDs), while deer losses in central and southern Maine WMDs were less pronounced. While the winter of 2001 was one of the harshest in the past 30 years, the spring of 2001 was good for fawn survival, and last year's lower deer kill combined with this year's mild winter has allowed the herd to rebound.