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buffybr's picture
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Pronghorn bullets

WesternHunter wrote:

Overall for pronghorn I think just about any jacketed bullet weighing at least 65 grains with enough velocity behind it will work well.  I know this is going to shake up the kettle real bad, but I just can't see using super premium bonded bullets on game like pronghorn. Spend that money on accuracy instead. Just my experience though.

That's been pretty much my experience also.  I've killed somewhere around three dozen pronghorns, all with standard cup and core bullets.  I've always felt that bullet placement (accuracy) is more important than bullet construction...as long as you're using a bullet that is designed for the size animal you are hunting.

There's been a lot said and written about the cost of premium bullets vs standard cup and core bullets.  As a handloader, premium bullets are about twice the price of cup and core bullets.  So for my .300 Weatherby, it would cost me about $0.27 per cartridge more to load 168 gr TSX bullets than to load 165 gr Ballistic Tip or GameKing bullets.  For my .257 Ackley, my favorite pronghorn rifle, it would cost me about $0.36 per cartridge more to load 115 gr TSX bullets than to load 115 gr Ballistic Tip or 117 gr GameKing bullets.

At todays fuel prices, one gallon of diesel for my pickup costs more than the cost difference of half a box of shells loaded with premium bullets rather than standard cup and core bullets.

hunter25's picture
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I agree but up until the

I agree but up until the seasons that are coming this year I have always used the same load and rifle from antelope to elk. While I sure don't feel I need my 7mm 160gr triple shocks for the antelope I know they are deadly accurate and I don't need to adjust my scope for a different load and then try to remember under stress which one I am shooting.

But I fixed that for this year and have set up a dedicated antelope rifle in 270wsm. Can't wait to try it out.

 

Critter's picture
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I should draw my tag for

I should draw my tag for antelope here in Colorado this year and plan on trying a new load of a 140 gr Nosler Balistic Tip at around 3300 fps.  I am hoping that I will not need to re zero my 7mm Remington mag but just be able to compensate on where the round is going to hit.  Right now I am shooting a Barnes 150 gr XBT at 3000 fps out of it.  So I'll see when I head to the range with some practice rounds and if they are only a couple inches high with the same scope settings I'll be good to go. 

BoneCollector's picture
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The more I read, the

The more I read, the more confused I become! lol.

I am taking my T/C Encore 300 WM this fall for Antelope and Mulies. I already had the gun, so buying a barrel was cheaper than another gun.

In addition, I want to sight this gun in with the round I'll use in the future for Elk. Just trying to keep it simple. I want a versatile round.

I was thinking about the Hornady 165 gr Interbond Superformance. However, the GMX also looks good. Looking for a flat shooter, good penetration, and avg weight retention.

Will these rounds hold up at these speeds? Good penetration and weight retention? I've been reading alot , but as I mentioned it gets confusing.

Thanks in advance for any information you can share. 

exbiologist's picture
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worry about elk loads in the future

Use your deer loads for elk and deer.  I have not used the 165 Interbond but I'm sure it will do just fine.  Really no need for even for that much weight retention on deer and antelope.  But I like lead core bullets, as they still give you some fragmentation, even when bonded.  Remember I use 100 grain ballistic tips at 3700 fps, and yes, they do exit.

I'd argue that not only is a GMX or TSX more than you need, you aren't getting as much energy transfer (which is why they penetrate so well), and therefore your critters are going to run a little farther.  I'm not saying you won't recover the animals, but lead core bullets do more damage from fragmentation, hydrostatic shock and whathaveyou.   If you do go to monolithics, go light and fast.

 

Huge holes, no meat damage if you put em in the lungs where they belong.

 

You can even see there's still pleny of core left on this one after it took her head off.  The core just zipped through the hair.  

BoneCollector's picture
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Thanks for the reply

Thanks for the reply Ex-Bioligist.

I am doing a dual hunt; aka mulies & antelope with my 300WM. Maybe I should drop down to a 165 gr BTSP for faster expansion/energy transfer instead of the Accubond 165 gr. ? Save the Accubond for ELK deeper penetration ...

Thoughts?

I'm trying not to re-zero my scope and such. I don't have the funds to try them all and do not hand load.

exbiologist's picture
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depends on your philosophies

If you also want this as an elk round for the future, go with a mid weight accubond or interbond, Partition or A-Frame. 165 is a decent compromise.  I prefer to use specialty stuff, so if it were me, I'd probably run a 150 for antelope and deer, then resight in with 180s or 200s for elk (you'll have at least a year)

buffybr's picture
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150 for antelope and deer

exbiologist wrote:

If you also want this as an elk round for the future, go with a mid weight accubond or interbond, Partition or A-Frame. 165 is a decent compromise.  I prefer to use specialty stuff, so if it were me, I'd probably run a 150 for antelope and deer, then resight in with 180s or 200s for elk (you'll have at least a year)

My thoughts exactly.  When I started hunting 40 some years ago, the only rifle that I had was a .30-06.  For the first few years I shot 150 gr bullets for deer, antelope, and elk.  I later upped my elk bullet to 180 grs, and that's what I used until I bought a specific rifle for deer and antelope.

Many deer and antelope have been killed with 180 gr bullets, and many elk have been killed with 150s.  My general rule for combo hunts is to use the bullet that best matches the largest animal I will be hunting, and it will probably work just fine for the smaller animals.

The closer you get to the animal, the easier it will be to make the shot.

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