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what do i need?

what would be a good pair of binoculars for hunting SE Alaska, somewhere in the price range of 250 to 500. I'm assuming all of the ones that are made nowadays are waterproof and fog proof. They've got to be reasonably lightweight. I only say that because I don't think I'll need a big honkin pair of noc's that I can see a mile away with. We're talkin about something I can use hunting moose, bear, deer, goat, hopefully someday caribou up north.
I'm buying a Leupold scope and rangefinder, should I just stick with the brand and get the BX-1 Rogue's?

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I had a pair of Leupold

I had a pair of Leupold Cascades in 10x42 that I tried to wear out but they kept going long after I gave them away to a nephew. The best thing that I can tell you is to stay away from the compacts. I have used them but eye strain sents in quite quickly using them, that is where I like the mid size of the 10x42's. They are lightweight enough with more field of view.
http://www.eagleoptics.com/binoculars/leupold/leupold-bx-2-cascades-10x4...

Another brand to look at would be Vortex, you get a lot for you money with that brand in your price range.
http://www.eagleoptics.com/binoculars/vortex

One thing that I would suggest for you to do is to head down to a local dealer and check them all out. Then once you have found a pair that you like check them out on line, you just may be able to get them a lot cheaper even after you have to pay shipping.

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GREAT. THANKS.

GREAT. THANKS.

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full sized

I also happen to think that compact binos are not for me. I own two pairs of full sized Binos; a pair of 9x40 Steiners and a set of 10.5x45 Vanguard Endeavors I actually got from this site. I had always been happy with my Steiners, but the new Vanguard Endeavor glasses are much better to my eyes. Very clear and although they have a 45mm lens, still fairly compact.

If I had a choice, I might go with the 8.5x45s, but the 1045 (10.5x45) is what I was given. I think the typical street price will fit nicely in your planned cost window as well.

http://www.opticsplanet.com/s/vanguard/brand~vd_cat~4

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different technology?

do binocular makers use the same technology that they put into their rifle scopes? the VX6 has a Xtended Twilight Lens System to help in darker hours. Are binoculars like that or are they just quality lenses put together side by side?

And as far as finding the right ones for the type of environment I plan to hunt in. what led me to ask that was; I know I wouldnt need a pair of binoculars that someone hunting for pronghorns in Montana would need. so I didn't know what kind of magnification that would best suite me. But I see that somewhere in the range of 8 or 10 x 45 will work well.

 And I'll set off to the local outfitter store this weekend to compare and get a better idea of the size and weight of different pairs.

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I like 10x for all around but

I like 10x for all around but a the same time I've used a pair of Leupold 8x for many years and never felt underglassed for nirmal use. And that includes Wyoming antelope and other distant animals. The 10 just gets you a little more for making out trophy details.

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2 Binoculars

I'm a two binocular kind of guy.

The 15X for sitting and glassing, using a tripod, and the 8X or 10X for spot and stalk. As for brands, I've got Minox and Vortex and couldn't be happier. Also, in the optics department, think about a Rangefinder too. I just chucked my Bushnell and have a Zeiss on the way.

Biker

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The rangefinder I'm looking

The rangefinder I'm looking at is Leupolds RX 1000i TBR w/ DNA. 400 bucks. But I've read that others are better. Swarovski is one of them. Yeah, their ridiculously cool and all that. But dang! They're as much as the scope I'm puttin on top of my rifle!

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I have been hunting for over

I have been hunting for over 40 years now and the only time that I have used a range finder was this last spring in Canada on my bear hunt. The guide told me that the bear was 318 yards away. Other than that I have taken shots anywhere from 3 yards out to 800 with no problems.

In my personal opinion they are over rated if you learn how to tell distances when you are out in the wilds. It is also like I have said, by the time you range the animal and then turn the turret to the range on the scope the animal will likely be gone. If not you have the time to get closer.

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GREAT! That's just one less

GREAT! That's just one less thing that I've got to come up with the money for.  One less thing that I've got to carry.  One less thing I've got to worry about breaking.  One less thing (fill in blank),etc.

I'm quickly finding out how many tools and gadgets we have nowadays just to help us put meat in our freezers.  The list is sometimes overwhelming.  So it is good to know that I can keep it simple and still be a successful hunter.  It's been done for thousands of years without the use of longrange custom rifles, and high dollar optics. Granted it's alot funner. But never- the-less it was still accomplished. 

It makes me wonder how many more are out there like Critter.  How many other good stories are there without somebody saying that they had to look through a pair of binoculars, then their rangefinder, then checked their GPS and the weather before they took their shot?

I'm not going to lie though.  Will I end up getting most of the tools and gadgets?  Yup. More than likely.  But I do believe there's going to be days when I leave it all home and jump in the truck with only the rifle and a sack lunch.  At least I'd like to think so.

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Get a good pair of binos

Your price point is perfect for a pair of binoculars that will last you for years. Get a pair of full sized binoculars from Nikon, or Leupold. There are many factors that go into binoculars and you can read about them here: http://www.opticsplanet.com/how-to-buy-binoculars.html.

For hunting purposes, good optics will help reduce eye strain, increase light transmission so you can more easily find your animal among the brush and the trees. Moreover, they will not fog up if you pay a decent price for them. Your price point is ideal for a good pair of binoculars.

The one thing that I'd have to add to the above mentioned - get a pair of binos with fixed magnification. Zoom binoculars that cost the same as a pair of fixed magnification are lower quality. An 8x42, 10x42, or 10x50 should suit you will. Anything above 10x will strain your eyes a lot. Your image will shake because your hands' shaking is amplified the higher in magnification you go. I prefer the 8x42. They are light, give you enough magnifiction and don't strain your eyes as much. Good luck in finding the right binocular for yourself!