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Location: Wyoming
Joined: 08/04/2006
Posts: 38
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

Just checking our group "pulse", if you will. I'm sure hunting's changed a bit since my first (unsuccessful - but important) season back in 1979. What will make you wince when you go to the woods this fall? Just a few of mine:

1. Hunters who think money can buy skill. These folks are the ones who tend to get lost when the batteries in the fifty-channel, color LCD screen, text-messaging GPS die. Now it appears there are digital riflescopes? What kind of batteries do those use? (I plan on putting a few in my pack, just in case I run across a "stranded" hunter who has a C-note to trade for a AAA battery).

2. Death of the Marksman. Contributed to by No. 1 (above). Seems it's not so important how well you shoot, but how good you look while doing it. I think most of us could be safe buying a box of shells and letting someone who brags about 500-yard shots blast away at us with them at that same range? C'mon now, most of us can barely see something (unaided) that far away. Sniping isn't hunting.

3. A rifle has to kick the bejeezus out of you if you're to prove you're really a man. No wonder the women I know who hunt generally shoot circles around the men? I'll admit, my .375 has vaporized a few prairie dogs, but once the novelty wore off, the pain set in and I was back behind the .243 or the .223.

4. ATVs. What part of "Road Closed" do we not seem to understand? Is it proper etiquette when armed with an ATV to not crash through the Forest Service's locked and posted gate, but rather - to go around it?

5. "Biggest-buck-itis" As if rack size were a measure of the size of our manhood? I don't think I'll ever be prouder of myself than the day I shot my first deer (a 3x4), though I've shot bigger ones since.

6. Food plots? Why not grow a deer in your fenced yard all summer, fatten him up, and blast him come fall? What's so "natural" about a food plot? What's the difference between a "food plot" and "baiting?"

7. Will the kids we bring into the sport respect us as their elder one day because of the gear we'll bequeath them, or by the skills we've imparted upon them?

8. Death of the hunter. The hunter I am nearly certain I will meet this season, though armed with the latest super-short-ultra-mag, digital scope, GPS, walkie-talkie, ATV driving down the closed road will be cursing that he hasn't seen anything in over 100 miles.

I sincerely hope you folks here will reassure me that I won't run into #8.

Just so I'm not accused of flaming, I DO own two GPS units, as well as two well-worn lensatic compasses. I've succumbed to the same marketing and have two "magnum" calibers in the gun safe, though for some reason I shoot "standard" calibers much more accurately. I'd like to have an ATV, but not necessarily to use while hunting (I don't think it'd fit in the back of the pickup in the first place - where would the deer/elk/pronghorn fit?). I can make a 600-yard shot on a 12" steel plate with a HB .22-250 Varminter off a bipod, but I'm a better shot when the range isn't so long.

Errbody hunt safe this season.

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Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

Although all your concerns are concerns for me as well, my biggest concern is the loss of good hunting land followed by the growth of anti-hunting organizations hell-bent on ending our beloved sport and hertitage.

CVC
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Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3586
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

Interesting that you would speak ill of those that brag about long distance shots, the size of the buck they've taken and using technology, but you feel compelled to point out that you've taken big bucks, shoot 600 yards and have magnums and GPS units.

I believe in to each their own. I think those new digital scopes are pretty cool, but I'll probably not own one because I'd rather spend the money on something else. Still, I wouldn't put anyone down for using one.

What is wrong with a food plot? Sure it is baiting, but isn't hunting near an oak tree or a farmer's field the same thing?

Want to do things the hard way, then great do it, but everyone is different and as long as it is legal I don't have a problem with it.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

I share the same concerns as well. I think my biggest though are hunters who just are plain ignorant of hunting rules and regs, especially those who violate firearm safety rules and common sence.

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Location: Florida
Joined: 08/02/2005
Posts: 85
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

Try this one....what about the landowners.....whose great great grandfathers recieved it free or next to nothing from the government. Who slam the doors in the faces of military members and hardworking locals who politely ask for access to hunt on thier thousands of acres.

They got the land for free only to drain it, channel it, fill it with bovine phosphorus or monoculture crops. If hunting is allowed, it is usually our favorite socialite trial lawyer or corporate blowhard that can shrug off the 10-25 thousand dollar a year boys club dues.

Hunting is doomed if the sport becomes the next rich elite country club activity, as in europe, where the common man has lost touch with the woods. As we watch strip malls and subdivisions replace our woods and wetlands, access to private lands has become an issue of greed.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

And what exactly are you going to do to help to insure that hunting doesn't end up like in Europe? Do you vote wisely? Do you write your congressman on issues concerning you?

The thing is that here in the USA land owners can do with their land as they please. No need to think ill of them just because they don't want you on their land or hunting their property. Many ranchers, farmers, and large property owners don't allow hunting on their property for many good reasons. The fact that their great great grandfathers were granted the land for free (with the exception of paying tax) has nothing to do with it, and should be a non-issue here. Besides how can you judge that? The current owners may have paid a pretty good price for it from the original landowner

The right to own property is one of the great things about capitalizm and democracy. Just don't make the mistake of thinking that just because you are a military member/veteran or a hardworking individual that you are some how entitled to being granted access to someones private property just because you asked them to hunt on their land (even if it was their great great grandfather who was granted the land)

As far as hunting being doomed.....well let me just say that hunting in the USA is still well reagarded as your average every persons sport who is willing to put the time and effort into it. Most hunters I know aren't socialites or super wealthy folks, they are average middle class Americans. Hunting has never been a trendy thing here and hopefully never will be. What's eventually going to doom hunting in the USA are two things - 1. Not passing on the tradition to our children and grandchildren, 2. Not being vigilant of legislation that threatens both our 2nd Amendment rights and hunting interests.

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Location: Wyoming
Joined: 08/04/2006
Posts: 38
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

Y'know, this really doesn't belong in this portion of the forum, now that I think about it.

I didn't mention land access, since there are likely those among us who are llandowners, and they probably have an entirely different view of hunting or circumstances to contend with than some of the rest of us do. Most of what I hunt is public (for now?) land. I no longer hunt private land, as the gentleman who used to let us hunt his property in exchange for some help at branding time or fixing fence has since passed away and his son has found other methods of making a living that generally excludes those of us who can't afford the fee.

Yeah, as a matter of fact I do own some of the very equipment I mention. A pity that very little of it has "enhanced" my abilities. I still use the same old Remington M700 in 30-06 (won it in a raffle) with the discount store 4x12 Bushnell. Though I can hit targets at 600 yards with a varmint rifle under benchrest conditions, I've not discovered the need to do the same with the old .30-06.(and don't think I've ever shot (or shot at) any big game beyond 150 yards, most have been in the 75 - 100 yard range). I rather pride myself on how many one-shot seasons I've had (not counting summer range time). While GPS makes navigation convenient, I've had to pull out the compass on more than one occasion because I didn't believe the direction the GPS was telling me to go - GPS was right, but it's sure nice to have that backup map and compass.

What I don't like is a non-hunting friend as I have now, who's interested in hunting, coming away from magazine articles, sporting goods stores, etc. shaking his head saying "there's no way I can afford to get into this sport," "You've gotta have all of this stuff". "You've gotta be able to afford a good guide to get a trophy". Where's all this come from?

CVC
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Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3586
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

"What I don't like is a non-hunting friend as I have now, who's interested in hunting, coming away from magazine articles, sporting goods stores, etc. shaking his head saying "there's no way I can afford to get into this sport," "You've gotta have all of this stuff". "You've gotta be able to afford a good guide to get a trophy". Where's all this come from?"

I suppose that someone without hunting experience would believe that it is cost prohibitive to get into hunting. But, I am sure you are there to help him out.

I like to archery hunt and I might be into all the gadgets if not for a friend who got me started and instilled a minimalistic attitude. Not that releases or peep sights are bad he just brainwashed me to the fact that the less equipment you have the less that you can forget or break.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

This is very true. I look at some of the new gadgets out there being introduced into the market and ask myself "does a hunter really need that?" or "when did we ever need that?"

One thing about GPS though - it's no substitute for a good map and compass coupled with good navigation skills. Always carry a map and magnetic compass not matter how much high tech GPS one may have with them.

Rifle scopes that cost 3X as much as the rifle it's mounted on - never seen the logic behind that. Reticles with bullet drop compensators - never seen the need for those either. Gee and what on earth is Leupold thinking by introducing a new scope that has such a huge objective lens that it need to wrap around the barrel of the rifle.....give me a break Brick Wall,)

Gut hooks on knives....I know it's become the trend, but I find them to be just a gimik with not nuch use to me. In fact I find that they get in the way. A good honest well made plain edge knife blade and a seperate pack saw is what I've found to be the most useful cutting tools.

The expense of hunting can be just like any other outdoor sport. You don't have to break the bank to do it, but you also don't have to settle for the cheapest stuff either. With wise shopping, knowing what you need and what to look for, you can buy some real good quality, practicle, and useful equipment without going broke.

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Location: Maui, Hawaii
Joined: 05/03/2006
Posts: 100
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

I dislike the "killer". I hunt wild pigs and Axis deer. Both are either sex and no size limit. I have had many an enjoyable hunt where I have seen game and have chosen not to shoot. I know individuals who advise me that I should "just throw lead". This attitude bothers me. I have a lot of respect for the animals that I hunt and pick my shots carefully so the kill is guaranteed and the chance of a wounded animal is zero.

The other hunter I dislike is the ones who will not pick their trash and williingly damage property for their convenience. In the area that I pheasant hunt, I am constantly picking up spent shells and drink containers. I watched one program where a rancher spoke of having to close access to his land because of the failure of hunters to close the gates. Every time the gates were left open, it would take him the better part of a day to round up all the cattle. In the area that I hunt somebody just cut a hole in the fence so they wouldn't have to climb over it!!!

redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
What are your concerns about hunting/hunters?

I agree with Rodney. I think a lot of tradition and ethics have been lost along the way. To many people going out and killing and not hunting. There's much more to be taken from a hunt beside the kill, and I believe too much emphasis is put on the kill rather than the life encompassing the hunt.
People wander why farmers and ranchers close hunting on their properties. We've had the same things happen on our property. Littering, driving through fences, tearing up fields when its wet, some people are just too lazy to do what's right Brick Wall,)

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