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Location: Pennsylvania
Joined: 10/28/2003
Posts: 1647
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

"right now i wish i could use dogs because its spring bear season and it would make hunting alot easier"

If your planning on following those dogs through the mountains. I bet it won't be any easier but if you have a well trained pack (or a friend with one Thumbs up ) your odds will be much better.

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Location: Virginia
Joined: 12/06/2007
Posts: 45
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

I as a hunter in VIrginia am against dog hunting with deer. The three farms I hunt are closed to all but 5 of us. But every year we have dogs released to run across the farm and i have been told by the dog hunters that they do it on purpose since they lost permission to hunt that land. I have also had incoming rounds hit the tree i was sitting in by some dog hunters shooting from the road. when i yelled to let them know i was there they started laughing. i am not as anti dog hunting as some people i know who shoot the dogsbut i will tell you if i get rounds coming in this year i am not yelling i am returning fire. are dog hunters bad people? i would say no not all of them as friends of mine use dogs for hunting wild pigs and take good care of their dogs. but with every group there are some bad people. as example there is a person who raises dogs and admits to having over 100 dogs, all running lose, all year round and half starved. I saw one slashed by a pig to where you could see its intestings and told the owner and he could care less, he said if it heals it heals. my county has a leash law and i did the law abiding thing and reported him for lose dogs and probley could of reported animal crulity but our local SPCA said they couldnt do anything about it cause i do not live in the are just work and hunt. If you want to hunt with dogs do it safely and leaglely. i am tired of seeing dead dogs by the side of th eroad and in the fields.

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Location: swva
Joined: 01/14/2008
Posts: 43
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

Va scout thanks for your comments and you are correct. If you care to visit our website at http://www.vahda.org and click on the news link, you will see some updated information concerning the complaints DGIF based the hound hunting survey on. I agree if everyone can't respect another out in the feild and hunt ethically then we as sportsmen have a problem.

Help protect Virginia's Outdoor Sporting Heritage!

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Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance
P.O. Box 657
Powhatan, Virginia 23139

Corporate donations are welcome and appreciated!

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Location: CHASE CITY
Joined: 06/20/2008
Posts: 3
Old school's out new school has NO RESPECT.

I have been following the deer dog issue for quite some time now. In my younger years, I took more than my share of deer via 'dog hunting'. I have matured into a more skilled hunter, with a son who can carry the outdoor abilities on to his son. We have acquired a fairly substantial amount of land that we manage for MATURE whitetails, turkey, quail. bear and rabbits. I do not get any government money i.e. WHIP, EQUIP, etc. by choice. my young son harvested his 3rd buck on the 2nd afternoon of the general firearms season by stalking. His smallest buck was 18 1/4" inside, a 10 pointer.
Now, let's get to the point. The 'dog hunters' are crying foul over the VDGIF, PETA, anti's, and 'trolls trying to take away their tradition. Please give me a break. Look in the mirror for once; have you messed up someone's opportunity at a big deer who still-hunts? Have you trespassed on someone's land who doesn't want you there? Do you have land of your own, or do you put your money into a hunt club of mostly non-landowners? Have your deer dogs spooked gobblers in the spring and ruined the only morning a young boy can hunt since he's in school evry other day of the week? Do you throw trash out on the guy's land who doesn't give your club permission to hunt? Does your club turn dogs aloose beside the tract that has food plots planted by a non-dog hunter? Can you be successful in the deer woods without a dog? The Indians did, I can, and a great number of Virginians can.
I would advise all of the dog hunters to examine their own issues, their co-club members, and acquire some respect for your non-dog hunting counterparts, because the shakedown is coming. There is enough money, enough true CREDIBILTY, and political respect against you. It's sad, because I have many friends that dog hunt and we respect each other's positions completely. But there are a few bad apples in any club, whether they poach, trespass, litter, cut fences, shoot from the road, or just laugh in people's faces. Everything will come out in the wash. Yes

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Location: CHASE CITY
Joined: 06/20/2008
Posts: 3
DOGS for DEER
numbnutz wrote:
I just have to know why you need a dog to hunt deer? I live in oregon where you cannot use dogs for anything besides birds. i feel that there is no sport in haveing a dog do all the work and running for you. i can see useing dogs for game like bear, cougar and such but for deer? to me it just seems like if you have to use a dog you have no actual hunting skills. like i said out here we cant even use them for bear or cougar anymore but we still manage to harvest them. as for deer i have had no problem shooting my fill every year useing my skills. to me it lazy to use dogs and not even hunting.

IT'S THE EASY WAY TO HUNT. MANY OF THEM DO NOT HAVE THE SKILLS TO BEAT A MATURE BUCK 1 ON 1, EXCEPT TO SHOOT IT OUT OF THE TRUCK WINDOW OR WITH DOGS CHASING IT.

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Location: swva
Joined: 01/14/2008
Posts: 43
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

I don't agree with everything you said. There is top notch houndsman out here who has gotten a bad rap because of the bad apples, just like spotlighters and roadhunters has given every hunter a bad name. we are all sportsman time is nearing for everyone to support all hunting and work together or your way of hunting may be next on the chopping block.

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Joined: 09/21/2008
Posts: 3
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

I as an avid still hunter AND dog hunter am completely ashamed of all of you! WE as well as our fishermen, need to stand together. There are many types of hunting I do not totally agree with, BUT I would never appoint myself as anyones judge!! as long as game is legally taken who has the right? ethics belong to the hunter. the hunt belongs to the hunter. for my fellow dog hunters, please be respectful and ethical, even if the respect is not returned. and for my fellow still hunters, please be aware that that ALL hunting is being jeopardized, deer- dog hunting is just a stepping stone, If dog hunting is done away with, please know that still hunting will be next!!!!, and fishing to follow.
I would like you all to know there is no right way to hunt. That my friends is up to the hunter.

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Moderator
Location: Florida,USA
Joined: 08/21/2003
Posts: 1566
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

Welcome to BGH georgia girl.

Very good post and very well spoken....so to speak.

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Location: swva
Joined: 01/14/2008
Posts: 43
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance

Hunting-dog owners try to keep opponents at bay
By STEVE SZKOTAK – 1 day ago

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — In a state considered the American birthplace of hunting with hounds, George Washington's favorite sport has become a target for some Virginia landowners who say baying dogs and their owners are trampling property rights.

Even other hunters object to a Virginia right-to-retrieve law viewed as the most absolute in the nation: Hunters have free reign to chase after dogs that stray onto posted private property.

Proponents are rising to protect their right to hunt, mindful that other Southern states have already limited or eliminated certain forms of the sport because of complaints from property owners.

Courtly fox hunters and down-home bear and coon hunters — an unlikely coalition — contend their heritage is at stake.

"If we have a major defeat in Virginia, I think it would hurt hunting with hounds in every state. Therefore, we will fight it at every turn," vowed Kirby Burch of the Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance, an umbrella group for 450 hunt clubs claiming more than 30,000 members.

A big part of the friction involves loss of rural habitat due to development. In Virginia, land is being developed at more than three times the rate of population growth, according to "Hunting with Hounds in Virginia: A Way Forward," a state-commissioned report.

The upshot: More dogs are running on private lands, riling property owners.

Forms of hound hunting have been banned from Washington state to Massachusetts, and Southern states have followed suit — in part because of opposition from animal-rights groups, but also from landowners. Texas banned hunting deer with dogs in 1990, and Alabama, Georgia and Florida more recently have restricted the sport.

Those actions have prompted officials to examine the sport in Virginia, where approximately 180,000 hunters use dogs. Game officials here say they hope to deal with the issue before problems mount.

Some hunters say the criticism comes from outsiders unfamiliar with the sport's heritage, but that's not always the case.

"An awful lot of what we consider 'new people' are sons and daughters of Virginia but don't have the tradition of the land," said Rick Busch, assistant director of the wildlife division of the state Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. "It's not necessarily Yankees piling into our Southern states."

Hunting with hounds in Virginia dates nearly 400 years ago to the founding of Jamestown, America's first permanent English settlement. Dogs are used to hunt bears, deer, fox, raccoons and rabbits.

Washington and Thomas Jefferson were among its earliest enthusiasts. Congressman John Randolph, who represented Virginia in the early 19th century, was known to enter the House of Representatives with a pack of hounds at his heels. The sport flourished among the Southern plantation culture and spread to Appalachia with Scots-Irish immigrants.

That was back when the same land supported far fewer people. Hunting enthusiasts and opponents alike wonder whether there's still enough room for the specially bred, high-priced dogs to run.

On Oct. 23, the Board of Game and Inland Fisheries is to consider proposals that seem to satisfy neither side. The proposals do not, for instance, recommend changes to the right-to-retrieve law, disappointing property owners like Ben Jones.

He became so weary of hunters traipsing after their dogs on his 165 acres about 40 miles southwest of Richmond that he billed the state $4,750. The bill was ignored.

"The Constitution says government can't take property from the private sector and place it in the public sector without JUST COMPENSATION to the property owner," Jones, a self-employed contractor, wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press.

The dog retrieval law is especially contentious when it comes to hunting deer, because such hunts can cover thousands of acres. Wildlife biologist Ben Fulton, a member of a state advisory committee that has studied hunting with hounds, said deer hunters with dogs disturb his own hunts on his 200 acres in Cumberland County. The right-to-retrieve law, he said, is an open invitation.

"All you have to do is go on somebody's property and just say, 'I'm looking for my dog,'" Fulton said. "I would like to see the law changed to where they had to gain permission."

Burch, of the Hunting Dog Alliance, said that alternative surely would be more irritating.

"Do you want me knocking on your door at 3 a.m. in the morning and saying I want my dog? C'mon," Burch said.

David Birdsall, 68, lives on a 500-acre farm in Gloucester County and has hunted deer since the 1960s. He also shows his Black and Tan Coonhounds.

"To hear these dogs run and chase is what it's all about," said Birdsall, a retired veterinarian.

When he hunts these days, he moves up Virginia's Middle Peninsula near Chesapeake Bay to a less populated county.

A little common courtesy, he said, goes a long way.

On the Net:
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries: http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/
Virginia Hunting Dog Alliance: http://www.vahda.org/

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Joined: 10/21/2008
Posts: 10
Dog Hunting

I don't hunt with dogs, but I don't support a ban on dog hunting either. I think it's a lazy, stupid way to hunt, but that's just my opinion. I don't have the right to tell you how to hunt.

But I do have the right to tell you to and your dogs stay off both my land and the land I have permission to hunt. Unfortunately, the Commonwealth of Virginia disagrees. "Hunters...may go upon prohibited lands to retrieve their dogs," is what it says on page 11 of the hunting regulations book. But on the same page it also says: "Landowners are under no obligation to allow hunters to retrieve game from their land. Think about this before taking the shot." The fact that these two conflicting regulations exist is proof that emotion, not common sense is what is driving the game laws.

Y'all need to let go of the attitude of "it's a tradition and it's my right," and ask yourself this question: "What does it look like to all those rich taxpayers when they go shopping the day after Thanksgiving and see a dozen rednecks flying up and down the road, jumping out, and standing beside a public highway with shotguns in their hands?" You may say you don't care what those people think. But keep this in mind: the rich yuppie homeowners have the money and political power, not us. Unless all of us, dog hunters and still hunters, band together and clean up our image, dog hunting is going to be banned whether we like it or not. And other forms of hunting won't be far behind.

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