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Location: Alaska
Joined: 05/03/2002
Posts: 8
View of "The Virgin"...

I notice there have been a few visitors to the story and am curious about the interest level. Have any of you experienced the same things? Did you enjoy your experience? Would you do it again?

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Location: Iceberg East of Nome
Joined: 04/06/2004
Posts: 3
View of "The Virgin"...

as they say in the backwoods that my kinda women!!!!

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Joined: 03/09/2004
Posts: 6
A few thoughts

1) Using two-way radios in Alaska to "aid in the taking of game" is illegal as heck. That is why they used "handles",

2) Wearing cotton on an Alaskan hunt is not too bright. Wool or fleece is better. The saying up here is that cotton kills.

I don't think I would go moose hunting with the crowd she describes.

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Location: Alaska
Joined: 05/03/2002
Posts: 8
Two Way Radios for finding game

I do want to explain to Alaskadoug that the other hunters up there were NOT using the radios "to find game", they WERE using the radios to keep close contact and information on any brown bear sightings. Yes THEY know and I know it is illegal for hunting purposes. The radios are kept for safety reasons, sir, since not only are the humans hunting moose but they are just as likely to run into a very hungry brown bear who is doing the same thing. IF one is lucky to escape a close encounter of the brown kind, that radio is gonna come in darn handy. And as for wearing "cotton", there were other kinds of clothing up there provided by other camp members. Up here, sir, we share if one does not have everything. Apparently you missed the point of the article. And as I mentioned in one paragraph, the group who spent thousands of dollars on all their hunting gear and paraphernalia spent three weeks in camp and DID NOT take home any meat. WE did.

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Joined: 03/09/2004
Posts: 6
Blondiepooh, you're full of pooh

Your article states

"Nearly everyone used a two-way radio to keep abreast of animal movement and each was identified by a unique name tag. One of the rituals of hunting camp was the dispersing of call names or "handles" for use on these squawk-boxes."

Keeping abreast of animal movement is illegal with two-way radios.

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Location: Alaska
Joined: 05/03/2002
Posts: 8
Ilegal radios and ANIMAL movement.

So find the quote that says, "moose movement". Yes I did write "animal" but in my naivete, in my first ever story of my first ever time at camp I FAILED to mention what kind of animal. One of the first things mentioned up at camp, especially for first-timers was the fact that there are brown bears and that the bears of the area have learned that gun-fire means food. The Kenai peninsula is well-known for it's brown bear population not to mention the fact that one of the hunters up there had already been the victim of a bear mauling (not by ONE bear but by TWO).
So thank you for pointing out the fact that yes, using the radios for tracking the animal you are hunting is illegal. It is not illegal to have them and keep track of your hunting companions or to ask if one has seen any bear sign. No one that I was with had their radio ON while they were actively hunting since all that doggone squawking would simply make too much noise.

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Joined: 10/30/2004
Posts: 117
View of "The Virgin"...

Hi BLondie

In the midst of this, I enjoyed your story.

But take to heart the fact about cotton. Especially if you will ever be in a true wilderness camp. Cotton and Down can both get you to be very dead.

And as to spending the bucks on gear-- don't discount it. Good gear can make you comfortable and save your life.

The reason the Cabelas crowd didn't come home with game is not due to their purchases as much as it was due to lack of knowledge and to some degree lack of luck if you will.

I personally purchased about 1000 bucks of gear to hunt Alaska in a drop camp last fall with a friend. We had chances to harvest all kinds of game every day and took caribou home with us. And my gear was extremely useful in the wind, rain, and cold. What I had at home would not have sufficed. And the wool was appreciated since I managed to fall in the lake the first day off an icy float.

Respectfully, Jeff

Oh yeah, PS I did a floatplane into the bush last fall. Wife is going as is her sister, brother inlaw and nephew with us in 2006. Hoping for a chance at a moose for me, caribou for them, a blackie if we get lucky, and hoping to figure a way to get to Kodiak cheap enough for a few days to take a deer to boot.

I just hope to find a place on kodiak devoid of 4wheelers and vehicles. I think they should all be banned from running around all over the place!

Jeff

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Location: Alaska
Joined: 05/03/2002
Posts: 8
Virgins and Radios, etc.

Hi Jeff,
Many thanks for your thoughts on the story.
As I tried to imply, this was my FIRST time out. I am now a rather "seasoned" visitor and I would also like to mention that our camp definitely had a few more accomodations than the fly-out-and-drop-'em in areas, this "camp" is over 25 years old and believe me, there are hundreds of stories to write about, I only touched the tip of the iceberg. I wrote about what I saw and experienced, unfettered by rules and regulations and "shoulda's". This last hunting season was my third time up there, second time with a weapon. Now THAT'S frightening and another story to tell.
Now I can say that I understand so much more the nature of hunting and why one goes back year after year. Not just for food but for the experience!

You are so right about the luck percentage: last year we had our first moose on opening day at ten a.m. Talk about luck! A freezer full of meat for a whole year. This season we have no moose meat in the freezer. And this year, we wore Scent-Lok, layers and no cotton. After a few years out there I know what to wear, what's good for you and what isn't. But it's much more interesting to read about the REAL people I have met in those hills, the real characters who
made their own rules and have discovered their own ways of doing things.

I have decided to write a book about the area and it's past and present inhabitants, this one will take a few years since it requires my presence during hunting season. I have a partial sequel to the first story you read called titled "Trails in the Moose"...let me know and I'll forward you a section. I just figure I am the female version of Patrick McManus....(:
Once again, thank you for your kind thoughts and am pleased you "enjoyed" a good read.

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Joined: 10/30/2004
Posts: 117
View of "The Virgin"...

Forward away. Email should be in profile.

FEmale Patrick. What a hoot. I haven't read Patrick in quite a while though he's always in bowhunter. Just haven't made the time. But I'll read yours. I happen to have an affinity for Alaska.

Off to work.

Jeff

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