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Don Fischer's picture
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upland dog?

To be blinded by love set's the one you love up to be a dissapointment should it for some reason fail to meet your expectations at some point. That's not fair to that which you love. I recall watching an interview with Mazzi Davis just befor the run that won "Quicksilver Pink" her National Championship at Ames Plantation. Her husband, Colin Davis, trained and handled "Quick Silver Pink". When asked how she felt their chances were that day Mazzi said that she didn't really know but that she felt they were ready. "But then again" she said, "she's just a dog and might have a dog day". She didn't but that's another story.

When "Dunn's Fearless Bud" won his National Championship, a very fine setter, and famous I might add, came up a bit short in becoming the first setter to win since "Johnny Crocket". I spoke with the breeder of that dog here at home and he was greatly disappointed, calling it a bird finding contest. Maybe it was and maybe it wasn't. But he had nothing to be disappointed about. The dog put down a great race and is none the less for not winning. Perhap's just to much was expected of the dog?

At the same time there was a great springer spaniel named "Brickfield Dewclose Flint" that prior to his run the first time he won his AKC National Championship was thought to be to big and heavy to win, he won twice in a row! I have watched the dog on several occassions and it was splinded.

William F. Brown wrote in his book, "Field Trial's": The greatest room in the world is the room for improvement"!

Never breed for average, never expect to much and except your dog for what it is, a dog.

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Location: Austin Colorado
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upland dog?

I'm Somewhere in between Don and the pointing breeds and Huntergirl07 and her pointing labs. I was hyped to find a pointing lab at one time but then had the chance to hunt behind one. It did'nt compare with my experiences hunting behind a well trained brit. Differences in temperment I think was the biggest factor. I think there are labs out there that will point and hold pretty steady but they are normally not as far ranging as the true pointing breeds, the nose really hasn't changed so its not quite the same. Labs will air scent to some extent but not nearly as good as the pointers. More receptors in the olfactory region thus genetics...hard to beat mother nature. Labs are really designed to ground scent and air scent when birds are close. On the side of the labs I've never seen a pointing dog dive for a duck under water and come up with it.

I think in my case labs are so important because they can really do a wonderful job at waterfowl while at the same time do a good job at upland. Chessy's are very moody and if your hunting buddy brings their dog there's likely going to be fur flying. I've hunted behind labs for the better part of 20 years and have found them to hunt well in most cases with the exception of hot dry conditions. Labs are designed for colder conditions and if you hunt in hot dry conditions they can be at risk of heat stroke. I have two blacks currently and will be considering a yellow to try and drop the solar aspect down a bit.

Labs are very bidable when it comes to training, they really just want to please. This is really important when it comes to many of us hunters that normally don't have the time to constantly work a dog in the off season. I normally try and work my dogs once a week in the off season which keeps their skills up. In many of the pointing breeds you will need to double or even triple that amount in the off season. Also labs respond well to yard training whereas the far ranging pointing breeds need to be out in the open and normally coupled with live bird training, ie pigeons and launchers.

In a perfect world (which I currently don't reside in) a pointer up front and a flusher bringing up the rear would be the perfect combo. But again that would take a lot of off season work.

Byrdofprey I hope we haven't confused you with this debate but remember that dogs are as personal as which car you chose. Each one has it's strengths and weakness and finding a happy medium is normally the best course when you are just starting out.

Don Fischer's picture
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upland dog?

Thumbs up

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Location: Pocatello, ID
Joined: 09/23/2006
Posts: 51
upland dog?

You guys are great. Of course, I have no idea what Im gonna do. Think It'll come to me. Cats like birds dont they Big smile

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Location: Moncton
Joined: 09/10/2005
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upland dog?

try this site for a dog

http://www.gundogsonline.com/hunting-dogs-for-sale/started-dogs/

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Location: Kennewick Wa
Joined: 01/10/2007
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upland dogs

regardless of the breed you pick... the most important factor is you inprinting on the dog. The amount of time spent with the dog will be directly proportional to the success you have with the dog in the field. This means if they can go to work all day everyday with you and they stay in the house and they exercise and they......... with you as much as possible from the moment they come home with you. So when people discuss uncontrolable dogs without shock collars i know how much time has been spent with the dog.
I cant stress it enough. it will transform your hunting experience. I know that this is much easier said than done but i am talking from recent experience. i have a vizla that was born feb 2006 and we've hunted oct, nov,dec and jan(season for chukar closes end of the month).
good luck in your choice. i like them all. i would add though that if you want to upland hunt get an upland dog and not a lab. labs are fabulous dogs but upland bird hunting is not their strength. in my mind the biggest disadvantage is they have a poor nose compared to brits, springer, and any pointing dog. upland dogs are to recon around and use all their senses to find the birds.
good luck.

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Location: Pocatello, ID
Joined: 09/23/2006
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upland dog?

Thanks 5jeeep and welcome to BigGameHunt.net. Hope you enjoy your experience here at the site as all of us do.

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Location: Minnesota
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upland dog?

Have you decided on what breed your going to get?

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Location: Pocatello, ID
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upland dog?

So far I'm leaning towards a brit. Mostly because of the nose I've heard about.

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upland dog?
Byrdofprey wrote:
So far I'm leaning towards a brit. Mostly because of the nose I've heard about.

May I suggest that you go to the "National Shoot to Retrieve Assoc." web site. Find out where some trials will be held near you this spring and go watch some dogs run. It used to be that a handler could take a guest in the field with him with the judges permission, may not be that way anymore. I believe you will probally enjoy yourself and it will open your eyes some. You can also go to AKC and try to find hunt test dates in your area. They will be broken down into pointing, flushing and retrieving dog classes. I'd suggest you avoid all AKC and Amer Field type field trials right now. Without a horse, you won't see much.

Edit with some info:
April 14/15

Snake River Versatile GDC Dbl/Dbl

At: Tibbits Ranch, Vale, OR

Chairman: Jeff Funke

8504 E. Scism

Nampa, ID 83686

208-989-0721
April 21/22

Snake River Sportsman BDC

Location: TBA

Chairman: Ed Westbrook

1200 Rosenau Road

Genesee, ID 83832

208-285-1739

This should get you going where your looking to go.

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