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Tndeerhunter's picture
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Tennessee and their hog problem

I'd like to give you all some information about how the state of Tennessee plans to deal with the spreading hog problems, within the state. This is a quote from the Tn hunting regs. 

"Wild hogs are a non-native species that are extremely detrimental to native plant and animal communities. Not only can they affect native wildlife species but they also pose a tremendous disease risk to humans and livestock. Wild hogs can carry brucellosis and pseudo-rabies both of which pose serious health risks to humans and animals."

 

Eliminate Status

 

"Wild Hogs have been removed from big game status and placed in a nuisance category.

These animals have been removed from big game status to a non-protected nuisance animal marked for eradication. Wild hogs cause extensive damage to farm crops, wildlife habitat, contribute to extreme erosion and stream pollution, and carry diseases harmful to livestock or other animals as well as humans."

This is another quote from their regs:   

"No. There is no longer a wild hog hunting season in the State of Tennessee. (Exception: Some East Tennessee WMAs allow the incidental take of hogs during other big game seasons, see WMA regulations for details.)"

Some more information regarding this "threat" of the wild hog's spreading in the state:

Why are wild hogs a problem?

 
"Wild hogs are a non-native species that are extremely detrimental to native plant and animal communities. Not only can they affect native wildlife species but they also pose a tremendous disease risk to humans and livestock. Wild hogs can carry brucellosis and pseudo-rabies both of which pose serious health risks to humans and animals"

Now, try to follow this question & answer, al the while knowing that there are 700,000 licensed hunters in the state:

Can I kill a wild hog while I’m hunting some other species?

 
"No. There is no longer a wild hog hunting season in the State of Tennessee. (Exception: Some East Tennessee WMAs allow the incidental take of hogs during other big game seasons, see WMA regulations for details.)"

 

The best I can figure is that my state, Tennessee's wildlife management is run by IGNORANT people.

They claim the wild hog to be a major problem, that requires the state to try and eradicate them, BUT do not allow licensed sportsman to hunt & shoot them. Just what am I missing here???  Help!

hunter25's picture
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Your right, pretty confusing.

Your right, pretty confusing. Since I don't know your laws I at first assumed that they were being moved from limited hunting to a wide open season to be shot on site. Bu to say that you can no longer kill them at all makes no sense whatsoever.

I would say that the hogs are not the only big problem that your state game department has.

Critter's picture
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I'd wager that who ever was

I'd wager that who ever was answering the question about being able to shoot a hog during another season miss spoked a little.  At least I hope that is what happened.  I know that quite often when you ask a question about a season and there isn't one for what ever you intend to hunt the answers get a little bit screwy. 

Tndeerhunter's picture
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wild hog regs

Tennessee has based their new hog hunting regs on the premise that there are "outlaws" (my term) that are live trapping hogs and setting them loose inside the state in areas not already inhabited by hogs. First, this act is already illegal within the state and second, why do they want to punish the masses for the sins of a few? For the record, I've never heard of one instance where people have been arrested for that crime, not one!

The state has decided (all on their own...!) that if there is no open season on hogs, no one will be tempted to break the law (they have never enforced anyway). Wow, what a concept! So, there will basically be no hunting of hogs on public lands, except for a VERY few exceptions. And, there will be no hunting of wild hogs on private lands, except by the owners and their immediate families. Hmmmmmmmmm....interesting. The state will allow property owners to submit, to the state and in limited numbers, names of people that might then be allowed to hunt hogs (them only!)

The entire scheme and idea seems so very far-fetched when you consider the state now wants to eradicate the hogs, completely and also that there are 700,000 legally licensed hunters within the state who will now be left out of harvest control. Extremely interesting concept there....

I submitted a letter to the editor on Wednesday to our local paper, 5th largest in the state. They emailed it back on Thursday asking me to please shorten it. So, I did and sent it back on Thursday so they could publish it. Not published on Friday, nor Saturday, nor today (sunday). BUT, this was published today in our paper and written by the staff outdoors writer, who writes a weekly article. Here's the link:

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20110814/COLUMNISTS11/108140323/...

For your edification, here's the letter I wrote, in shortened form, that they received on Thursday afternoon: (looks like they allowed their staff writer to beat me to the punch and also to side with the TWRA, who he works closely with)

My letter (yet to be published):

From: Ed T
To: M@theleafchronicle.com>
Cc: Ed T
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2011 2:21 PM
Subject: TWRA and the invasive wild hog

Let's look at what the state of Tennessee has recently done to help stop the spread of this bothersome invasive species. Have they opened up more of the state to hunters to help control this "non protected nuisance animal" (their own words)? No! Have they encouraged hunters to shoot such animals; "nuisance animals marked for eradication" (again, their words) on sight as they hunt the woodlands for other species? No!
  
What they have done about this problem "in response to concerns from landowners", is to have removed the wild hog from the huntable species list. They are found nearly statewide and reproducing at an alarmingly high rate (one fertile sow can have 3 litters of up to 10 piglets per year!). While on the one hand they bemoan the spread of the hog and the "diseases they carry that are harmful to livestock or other animals as well as humans" and that also "cause extensive damage to farm crops, wildlife habitat, contribute to extreme erosion and stream pollution...",  they (the TWRA) have severely hampered the licensed hunters of the state in helping with the planned "eradication" by stopping the hunting of wild hogs on all private lands. Landowners and their families may hunt hogs, but will have to apply for a special exemption permit from the state, available in limited numbers, for others to hunt their lands and kill the hogs found there. 
  
As a licensed sportsman who has hunted the great state of Tennessee for nearly 20 years now, I am appalled at such a backwards solution to this mounting problem. Does the TWRA really think that their new plan of control and eradication stands a chance of success without the help of about 700,000 legally licensed hunters? Well, no other state, now having problems with wild hogs agrees, none!  They have, instead opened up hunting for hogs almost universally to all year long for licensed hunters, throughout their states.
 

 

What's up TWRA ?? 

 

Sorry to have been so longwinded here, but I knew no other way to explain the problem(s) further. 

 

WesternHunter's picture
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wild hogs

The south has traditionally had a neusance problem with wild hogs since shortly after the first Spanish Conquistadors arrived in the New World.  They have since served as a great food source for southerners ever since.  In fact that was the sole purpose for their introduction to the New World.  Now California and to a lesser degree Oregon are now beginning to see the results of an expanding population of swine.  I don't think wildhogs should ever be elevated to big game status. Hunt and kill them at will as needed.  There surely is no shortage of them, especially throughout the southern USA.

Tndeerhunter's picture
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There's a problem

Well, therein lies our problem. The state has now made it illegal for most all hunters within the state to hunt hogs. Read that again.... i l l e g a l! One one hand, they want the hogs "eradicated" while on the other, they no longer allow hogs to be killed on state & federal lands (except for a very few exceptions) and also on private lands (where only land owners can hunt them, along with those designated by "special state permit status" in limited numbers by landowners). 

Sad, but true.....

WesternHunter's picture
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State of TN

Tndeerhunter wrote:

Well, therein lies our problem. The state has now made it illegal for most all hunters within the state to hunt hogs. Read that again.... i l l e g a l! One one hand, they want the hogs "eradicated" while on the other, they no longer allow hogs to be killed on state & federal lands (except for a very few exceptions) and also on private lands (where only land owners can hunt them, along with those designated by "special state permit status" in limited numbers by landowners). 

Sad, but true.....

Gee, what happened down there?  Did all those liberal politicians who've destroyed hunting in New Jersey and Massachussets suddenly invade the southern states?  I just never thought I'd hear of such a thing in the South.

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Oregon Hogs

I've lived in hog country 22 yrs now and have never seen one. The rancher's see them now and then but most of them agree there just isn't as big a population as everyone seems to think.

Been to hot to get back into where a friend and I are going to look for then, really dry grass. But I have walked in a few baits and nothing has bothered them. State has been trapping them but I was told by a rancher yesterday that they've only got about 15 all told on his place and his neighbors.

I have eaten it a couple time, better than any deer I ever ate!

Critter's picture
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I just read through a lot of

I just read through a lot of what the Tennessee's department of wildlife had to say on their web site and it looks like they figure that hunters are not going to be able to control what they see as the problem.  Now if you have some private property or know of someone that has some then you are set.  The big thing is that they want to eliminate all of the hogs there.  Not just a few every season or some here and some there.  Granted they should just open it up to if you see one you shoot it but with that comes a lot of other problems. 

Tndeerhunter's picture
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hog hunting

The state's purpose in doing this, they claim, is to try and stop the introduction of live, trapped hogs to new areas of the state, by "hunters" wanting to establish a huntable population. In other words, they claim people are breaking laws already in effect, and their plan to stop this is to not allow hunting, hence no one will want to trap & release now.

I have two very big problems with this decision: 1.) why do you think it's right to punish the masses for the sins of a few?

But more importantly: 2.) Why don't you simply enforce those laws already in effect and arrest, convict and severely penalize those people you insist, exist. (There's never been any person arrested for this crime, EVER, to the best of my knowledge)

I simply fail to see the good in having way less people who can legally shoot hogs, when you want to stop their spread and eradicate them. It's my experience that it's one thing to gain verbal permission to hunt property in Tennessee(all that's needed), but it will be quite another for a landowner ( or farmer) to take the time to contact the state on your behalf and secure you a permit to hunt his land (again, nothing like that needed for deer or previously for hogs)

My firm opinion is there will be very few permits allowed for private hunting now, simply because landowners do not want to be bothered (here, many landowners do not hunt themselves, simply allow friends to hunt their lands) How will far less hunters be able to do a "better" job of killing and controlling the hogs?? I'm at a loss to explain that thinking, period.

I still see absolutely zero sense in this method of "control"(??). No more hunting on public lands and no more hunting (as it had been allowed) on private lands. Only thing left, I reckon, is when pigs begin to fly. Maybe we can then whack them as they pass over then..... Dancing

 

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