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Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
synthetic stock question

I really like synthetic stocks. I like the fact that they can take a bump without decreasing the value of the firearm. I have rifles with beautiful wood and I took off the wood and put a synthetic stock on. I have not tried the laminate stocks so they may be okay as well. Most of my stocks are the heavier HS precisions on varmint rifles but I do have a couple of lighter sporter on hunting rifles. Just remember that every time you hear that clunk when you hit your syn. stock that you would be making a new scar on a wooden one. Thumbs up

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
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synthetic stock question
ChesterGolf wrote:
Just remember that every time you hear that clunk when you hit your syn. stock that you would be making a new scar on a wooden one. Thumbs up

I prefer to think of them as "cherrished moment's", or maybe "fond memories"!

Chuck-n-Alaska's picture
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Location: Southcentral Alaska
Joined: 04/26/2007
Posts: 222
synthetic stock question

I'm still undecided here. I do know the current one one is going bongo drums and hunting don't make it. I like wood for aesthetics, but no doubt the synthetic stock will be more durable. I seldom sell my guns so resale value isn't an issue and bumps and dings do bring back memories. I think if most of you folks saw my guns you would probably have a kitten. Most of them are well used, I maintain them but that doesn't seem to help their looks. Any way thanks for all the help.

I just found this board a while back, I have to tell you this is one of the more helpful boards I've been on in quite some time. It is also one of the most polite ones going.

Thanks Again

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Location: Phila., PA
Joined: 03/15/2007
Posts: 171
synthetic stock question

remove buttsock/recoil pad
most likely stock is hollow,
got to home improvement store and buy a can of expanding foam insulation
fill stock with it, do this in 2 or 3 sittings, rather then tring to do in 1, makes for a better job.
trim excess from butt of stock, replace recoil pad, and enjoy a MUCH qieter rifle

Just my $.02

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 601
synthetic stock question

It seems to rain or snow all fall here in north idaho. I won't go back to wood. I do have a laminate stock and it does feel better in the hand than the synthetic but i won't go back to wood. Especially on remote pack in style hunts.

I guess it all depends on how you look at your guns. They are tools to be used and abused. so wood dont work for me there. lol

tim

Chuck-n-Alaska's picture
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Location: Southcentral Alaska
Joined: 04/26/2007
Posts: 222
synthetic stock question
Quote:
They are tools to be used and a
Quote:
bused. so wood dont work for me there. lol

Thats kind of how I look at my guns by the time they spend the summer on a 4-wheeler and the winter on the snow machine wood takes a beating. I like the way a good piece of wood looks, but synthetics sure are more durable.

Nathan's picture
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Location: NewZealand
Joined: 05/17/2007
Posts: 44
synthetic stock question

Hi guys, so sorry for not replying sooner, I run a guided hunting business in NZ and have been pretty busy.

The recoil pad of the Remington is screwed on, the holes tend to close up after the factory staff fit the pad so it can be hard to find the holes. The screws will have phillips heads.

Once the but is removed, the foam is sprayed into the butt, it then expands of its own accord.

If you want to deal to the forend, more so to stop flexing, I have a methopd of bedding that can help.

Obtain a piece of 2" diameter stainless Dairy tube or ali pipe.
Cut about 5" long.
Scribe a 1 and a quarter inch cut width down the length of the pipe.
Cut out this section which will be your bedding block. The bedding block will start at the fron of the magazine well and extend a ways out into the fore end.
Measure where you need to drill a hole for your action screw and recoil lug.

From the front of the recoil lug frowards, the block will have to be tapered on both sides to fit the barrel channel. At the very end of the block you can either fold the tip of the tube down at 90 degrees or weld a small lug on the bottom.

Fit and use bedding compound to install the block. A second bedding will be required for the actual barreled action.

Once done, the Remington will have a form of bedding that will spread the torque/stress of recoil into the forend, ideal for high velocity medium bores.

The job may sound complex as I probably have not explained it vey well. Its not a complex job and for those who have access to a workshop, the block is really just a 5 minute job. The system works on either synthetic or wood stocked Remingtons and really aids accuracy. I use this on my Rem BDL switch barrel in .338 Win Mag, 9.3 RUM and .375 RUM.

Cheers, Nathan.
http://www.ballisticstudies.com.

JJD
JJD's picture
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Location: Right Side WA state
Joined: 11/07/2008
Posts: 208
synthetic stock question

Hey Guys,
Hope ya don't mind me resurrecting this post.
I'm new here and found it in a search for info about synthetic stocks

Back ground. Live in E WA state
My dad was a Gunsmith (wish I'd paid more attention)

Only synthetic stocks I've ever owned are on shotguns, Guess my dad passed on to me the appreciation of good wood. However, I've ended up with a 700 BDL in 300 Win Mag with a synthetic stock.

Are there any good articles or personal advice on accuracy and improving these stocks?
General suggestions on care, maintenance and use?

Appreciate your time,

oops,
Missed page 2 of the posts & did read the stock article that was linked

Nathan's picture
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Location: NewZealand
Joined: 05/17/2007
Posts: 44
synthetic stock question

Hi JD, I work with Synthetic (plastic) stocks every week as part of our accurising servboices here in NZ. Plastic stocks can be a real problem and this year I have had many rifles sent to me which would not group inside 3" at 100 yards. the worst have been the Savage rifles. Nevertheless, once bedded, a lot of plastic stocks work just fine. Here a few notes to consider:

Your .300 Winny will produce a lot of recoil torque to the stock so it is imperitive that the bedding platform be sound and strong.

Do not free float the forend unless you bed the action. If the forend pressure is removed without bedding, the Remington rifle will not shoot at all. (Savages syn rifles come with a free floated barrel- had one that grouped 2 feet at 100 yards a couple of months back)

Epoxy bedding compounds have poor adhesion to plastic. Make sure, if you are doing the bedding yourself, that you really key into the stock and create mechanical locks. Brownelss have some really good advice in their Acraglas kit instructions.

Keep an eye on the forend, inspect it when the rifle is apart, prior to bedding. If it is too flexible (can be twisted in your hands, it will need a light fill with resin to strengthen it.

I have found a big problem lately- guys work up loads for magnums in syn rifles, think they are at max velocity because groups open up but really the problem is that recoil torque to the stock is opening up groups. Example would be: Prior to bedding/ 180 gr bullet/ 2600fps good, 2700 fps ok, 2800fps groups open right up. Post bedding/ 180 gr bullet/ 2800fps good, 2900 good/ 3000 to 3070fps groups close right down to .75", 3150fps groups open up due to begiinnings of excessive pressure.

Hope that helps, email me if you get stuck with anything.

Cheers, Nathan.

JJD
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Location: Right Side WA state
Joined: 11/07/2008
Posts: 208
synthetic stock question

Nathan,
Thanks for the info, may come in handy.

Am just getting material together to start developing loads for the rifle, so don't really know how it's performing with the original stock. Will find out in the near future.

Have you gotten your hands on one of the Carbelite stocks from Bell & Carlson? Built up from hand-placed layers of Kevlar and fiberglass over graphite. Sounds like it ought to be tougher than Hades, but have no idea how it handles recoil with hotter loads.

Had to retire the 30-338 my dad and I built in the late 1960's, on a springfield action. Barrel throat wore out and the metal in the action ain't gettin any younger. If this 300 does not work out, I'll have a smith chamber another up for me. Already have the dies and formed brass.

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