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Swing Blade outdoor edge

Has or does anyone use the swing blade knofe made by outdoor edge.  Would you recommend it for elk?  I have about 4 different knifes I plan on taking with me for field dressing but the skinning part of the swing blade looks like it would make skinning much easier.  Any thoughts?

exbiologist's picture
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I like Outdoor Edge knives

Good value for the money, but I do not like folding blades.  And that one seems completely pointless because it has the folding action that you can gunk up, but you can't actually fold the knife.  So it's neither clean and strong like a fixed blade, nor compact like a folder.  I like about a 4-4.5 inch fixed blade (I know, that's kinda large) and I do everything with it by keeping it sharp.  I also bring a small hatchet with a saw blade (by Gerber) in the hilt for bone work.  I don't core the butthole, I split the pelvis, so I have no need for a small knife.  

I think a top value in knives are the Cabela's outfitter series knives, but it looks they have been discontinued.  Mine was in the shape of the Buck Vanguard, so I'm curious to try the Alaskan Guide Series in S30V steel.  I got an s30V Gerber Freeman for Christmas, but haven't used it yet.  I don't like the shape of the blade on that knife though.

GooseHunter Jr's picture
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I used one last year on an

I used one last year on an antelope now I know the skin on an antelope is alot thinner than an elk, but this knife was so sharp that I think it would work great on an elk with no problems.  I too am not a big fan of a folding knife, butb this one may be the exception and I may just have to get my own for the pack.  Still like my Gerber the best though.

WesternHunter's picture
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good

Outdoor Edge has some nice knives. I hear good reviews of them.  I don't own any myself and never used any of theirs.  I use either a Gerber Magnum LST locback, a Buck 110, an recently this last season used my Ontario RAT-3 knife.  I typically bring my Gerber camp hatchet or Fiskars folding saw along too as well as a Rapala fillet knife.  That RAT-3 knife is a pretty tought stout knife with a thicker edge and point than most, the only knife I have that I'm not worried about damaging when splitting the pelvis or cutting through the breast bone with. 

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I still use the same Buck

I still use the same Buck knife i've used for 40 years. I do like the skinning blade from the Swing Blade. I saw somewhere that had just the skinning blade from the Swing Blade. It was a fixed blade too. I was thinking of getting one, and use my Buck for everything else.

WesternHunter's picture
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blade

Still Hunter wrote:

I still use the same Buck knife i've used for 40 years. I do like the skinning blade from the Swing Blade. I saw somewhere that had just the skinning blade from the Swing Blade. It was a fixed blade too. I was thinking of getting one, and use my Buck for everything else.

I think the Oudroor Edge knife you are refering to is called thier Hybrid Hunter knife.  It has a very nice fixed blade, what I would call an ideal hunting blade.  I just wish it had a better handle on it, solid material without the holes. 

All in all though I've always been pretty happy with the knives I'ves used from Buck. 

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I'm talking about the other

I'm talking about the other end of the swing blade. The end that opens the hide. Not the knife end.

 

It seems to open up the hide easier than using a knife. It cuts from the inside out, and doesn't get caught up in the hair. It almost looks like unzipping the hide. No danger of cutting the guts.

exbiologist's picture
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one trick

I've developed a trick over the years for gutting that allows me to move quickly, not use a gut hook, and is easy to do when you're by yourself.  

 

What I do on deer sized game, but this works for elk too, is to hold the torso between my legs, facing straight up at me, while I'm facing towards the butt end.  I then slash with my knife straight down to the brisket and proceed to gut from there.  This way I can get all the depth below the skin and muscle that I need with no danger of piercing the gut.  The gut is also shifted back towards the rear, leaving a nice gap around the diaphragm.  Much easier this way, with less danger of pierced gut, but seems bassackwards to many people who watch me do it.

WesternHunter's picture
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traditional way

Whatever works fo ya.  I've always just done it the traditional way using a good sharp blade and proper technique, never pierced the gut doing it that way.  Just insert two fingers and pull up while slitting and it works perfectly fine.  Never seen a need for gut hook type blades, they seem like a good idea in theory, but in practice it's a whole other story.  That gutting blade on that Swing Blade seems like a real nice and practical design though. Opening the gut on a deer or pronghorn doesn't take much time anyway, so I've never seen a need to deviate from the traditional method of doing it using a good sharp 3 1/2 inch drop-point or clip-point blade.  I've tried other methods and haven't found much attribute to them over the traditional method.  That's just me.

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