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Joined: 10/15/2006
Posts: 127
Stop Elk Release by TWRA

Jack Taniewski, DVM
Assistant Director for Animal Export
National Center for Import/Export
USDA, APHIS, Veterinary Services

Will the information listed below stop the importation from Elk Island?

2. CERTIFICATION STATEMENTS

(d) The herd of origin does not contain animals from any herd where tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), or brucellosis (Brucella abortus) has ever been diagnosed.

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:ybgnvsxpzdIJ:www.montana.edu/~wwwcb...

7. Choquette, L.P.E., J.F. Gallivan, J.L. Byrne & J. Pilipavicius. 1961. Parasites and diseases of bison in Canada I. Tuberculosis and some other pathological conditions in bison at Wood Buffalo and Elk Island National Parks in the fall and winter of 1959-1960. Can. Vet. J. 2: 168-174.
Tuberculosis and some other pathological conditions in bison at Wood Buffalo and Elk Island National Parks in the fall and winter of 1959-1960 are discussed. In 1959, 1,116 animals were tested with bovine tuberculin and 151 or 13.5% showed a positive reaction. There were 436 animals slaughtered, and 219 or 50.2% showed tuberculous lesions, and 168 or 76.7% of these showed evidence of infection in the lymph nodes of the head. Metritis was noted in 9 animals, 7 of which were tested with tuberculin and 3 tested positive. Eleven cases of orchitis were recorded in bulls. Nine of these had been tested for brucellosis (rapid serum agglutination technique) and 7 tested positive.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1680143&pageindex...

page #120

In 1947 and later, Brucellosis was diagnosed in bison from Elk Island.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1585688&pageindex=1

page #168

Elk Island is an area of about 75 square miles.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1585688&pageindex...

page #171

Arthritis, actinobacillosis, coelosomian & pyemia.....Hepatic lesions at Elk Island

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1585688&pageindex...

page #172

orchitis & brucella

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Dr. Taniewski,

Since Elk Island is so large, about 75 square miles, and since the animals that are confined there are wild and free to roam over this vast area and since the animals live off what the land provides, it is my opinion that these animals do not meet the term captive farmed. Am I correct to assume that? Canadian officials refer to this herd as a wild herd and rule #1.3 states that: Animals born in the wild are ineligible for entry under this protocol.

1.3 Cervids described on the health certificate are all captive farmed. Animals born in the wild are ineligible for entry under this protocol. Properly identified cervids under 6 months of age, traveling at the side of their dam, are exempted from the test requirements.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1585688&pageindex=1

page #168
Elk Island is an area of about 75 square miles.

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Dr. Taniewski,

Is the Elk Island herd truly a captive herd? Animals seem to be able to freely come and go.

http://www.naturescapes.net/perspective/alberta.htm

The bison, elk, and moose are confined in the park by a 2.2 meter fence encircling the entire park boundary. Bison and elk are managed by the park staff, and numbers are occasionally sold off to control the population, as there are no large predators, such as wolves or bears, in the park. The moose population is controlled mainly by disease. Deer are able to leap the fence and so can come and go.

http://www.booneandcrockettclub.com/news/trophyWatch_detail.asp?area=new...

A picture of a Moose jumping over the Elk Island fence which is only 2.2 meters high. Deer and other wildlife commonly come and go over the fence.

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Dr. Taniewski,

How can an enclosure as large as Elk Island meet the following rule?

2.2 Continuous records of animal identification and herds of residence of the animal being exported from the time of birth until export were verified.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pagerender.fcgi?artid=1585688&pageindex=1

page #168
Elk Island is an area of about 75 square miles.

****************************************

Thank you for your time and response.

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CERVID IMPORT REQUIREMENTS FROM CANADA TO U.S.

File name: Canada_Cervids.doc

1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

1.1 No import permit is required if the cervids are offered for entry at a land border port and meet one of the following conditions: (a) were born in the U.S. or Canada and have been in no other region, or (b) were legally imported into Canada from some other region and have been unconditionally released and eligible to move freely within Canada for at least 60 days after such release. In any other case the importer must obtain an import permit from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road, Unit 39, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

1.2 An official health certificate is required. The official health certificate must be issued by a veterinarian designated by Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), and must be endorsed by a veterinarian employed by CFIA attesting to the certifications and tests required in this protocol.

1.3 Cervids described on the health certificate are all captive farmed. Animals born in the wild are ineligible for entry under this protocol. Properly identified cervids under 6 months of age, traveling at the side of their dam, are exempted from the test requirements.

1.4 All cervids must be identified with an official unique individual eartag or tattoo, and must also have a large readable bangle eartag which allows the bangle numbers to be checked without offloading the animals. Bangle tag numbers and corresponding official tag or tattoo numbers must be recorded on the health certificate.

1.5 The health certificate must contain the certification statements as listed in the following section. The dates and results of the tuberculosis and brucellosis testing must be recorded on the health certificate.

2. CERTIFICATION STATEMENTS

2.1 Canada is free of foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, contagious pleuropneumonia, and surra.

2.2 Continuous records of animal identification and herds of residence of the animal being exported from the time of birth until export were verified.

2.3 Herd of origin status:

(a) Chronic wasting disease has never been diagnosed in the herd of origin.

(b) The herd of origin is a tuberculosis herd of negative status according to the provisions of the CFIA captive ungulate program, and there has been no direct no indirect contact between the herd of origin and any known tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) infected source.

(c) The herd of origin is located not less than forty (40) kilometers from any known Mycobacterium bovis, Brucella abortus or chronic wasting disease infected wild population.

(d) The herd of origin does not contain animals from any herd where tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), or brucellosis (Brucella abortus) has ever been diagnosed.

(e) Neither tuberculosis nor brucellosis has been diagnosed on the premises of origin during the five (5) years preceding the start of testing for export.

(f) On the premises of origin, there are no M. bovis susceptible ruminants, that have not attained the status of a herd officially recognized free of tuberculosis or a herd of negative status for tuberculosis under the Canadian Animal Health Program for Farmed Cervids.

2.4 The animal intended for export is not the direct offspring of an animal that has been diagnosed with chronic wasting disease nor has it resided at any time in a herd in which the disease has been diagnosed.

2.5 If less than one year of age, the animals intended for export were natural additions to the herd of origin.

2.6 Animals intended for export which were added to the herd of origin, except natural additions or animals from other tuberculosis herds of negative status or U.S. Accredited Free herds, have been included in a recertification test.

2.7 During the 60 days prior to export to the United States, the cervids selected for export and the herd of origin remained free from symptoms of infectious or contagious disease, and free of any known exposure to such disease.

3. TESTING REQUIREMENTS

3.1 Tuberculosis - Within 60 days prior to export, each cervid must be tested with negative results for bovine tuberculosis using the Canadian Mid-Cervical Test (MCT). Any cervid classified as a responder to the MCT is ineligible for entry. However, if the status of all responders can be established by comparative testing, or by post-mortem examination and tissue culture, negative contact animals may be considered for entry.

3.2 Brucellosis - Within 30 days prior to export, cervids must test negative to a buffered plate antigen test for Brucella abortus. Should an animal test positive, it is ineligible for entry. It must be removed from the group and test negative to a complement fixation test at a dilution of 1:5 in order for the test negative contact animals to be considered for entry.

4. PORT OF ENTRY INSPECTION

Cervids for U.S. entry must be presented to the port by appointment. The port veterinarian shall conduct a visual health examination of the cervids and verify individual identification and the correctness of the health certificate.

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Posts: 127
Stop Elk Release by TWRA

Governor Phill Bredesen,

The interstate movements of Cervids, for the purpose of being released into the wild, should be suspended until such time as there is an accurate and an approved live animal CWD test. Once the imported cervids are released into the wild, state wildlife agencies have shown that they are incapable of finding many of the deceased animals in time for a CWD test and therefore can not properly monitor the released animals. In the event that there is an outbreak of CWD in the imported cervids, state wildlife agencies have shown that they are incapable of containing the outbreak and preventing the further spread of the disease. Since state wildlife agencies have no real way to properly handle, track, monitored and account for the released cervids and since the released cervids are free to roam where ever they please coming in contact with other wildlife and livestock over a very large and unrestricted area, the risk of importing cervids for release into the wild is too great and puts both the wild herds and captive herds at an unacceptable and unnecessary risk.

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Location: Canada
Joined: 12/26/2006
Posts: 323
Stop Elk Release by TWRA

No Lynn I did not miss your point at all. Carry on, I am not wasting any more of my time time on this.....there is obviously little use. I do not disagree with your goal. Good luck.

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Posts: 127
Stop Elk Release by TWRA
Makwa wrote:
No Lynn I did not miss your point at all. Carry on, I am not wasting any more of my time time on this.....there is obviously little use. I do not disagree with your goal. Good luck.

Makwa,

Thanks for your input input.

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Posts: 127
Stop Elk Release by TWRA

Within the last month, three cases of CWD have been diagnosed in wild deer about 100 miles from the Elk Island herd. Elk commonly travel 75 to 100 miles in a short period of time just grazing. CWD can take up to 5 years to develop in an animal so as anyone can see, importing any animals from the Elk Island herd will put both our wildlife and livestock at risk for disease.

In talking with an official with the Kentucky State Wildlife Agency yesterday, they confirmed that if that shipment of elk are transported through KY, they will be stopped and all animals will be put down, killed, and tested. Missouri does not want the elk coming through their state either.

This importation of high risk elk should be stopped and many the surrounding states feel the same.

Another CWD positive was diagnosed near Elk Island. This was confirmed January 4, 2007 near Chauvin. This makes three cwd positive deer near the elk island herd in less than one month.

http://www.srd.gov.ab.ca/fw/diseases/cwd/index.html

Update - January 4, 2007
Alberta is continuing testing for the provincial chronic wasting disease (CWD) surveillance program for 2006-07. One additional case of CWD in wild deer was confirmed on January 2. This brings the total to 17 cases in wild deer in Alberta since the first case in September 2005.
The most recent case was taken by a hunter near Chauvin, not far from an earlier case reported in late December.
Hunters are reminded that submission of deer heads is a requirement in five wildlife management units along the Alberta-Saskatchewan border: WMUs 150, 151, 234, 256 and 500. Any heads taken in these areas and kept frozen since the animal was shot can still be dropped off at a Fish and Wildlife office or at one of the 24-hour freezers

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Posts: 127
Stop Elk Release by TWRA

The RMEF and TWRA is aggressively pursuing this risky elk importation because they have developed a scheme to sell four chances to hunt an elk bull in TN that they expect to net TWRA somewhere between $200,000.00 and $400,000.00 so to them the risk is worth it. TWRA is willing to put the wild native deer herd and livestock in TN and surrounding states at risk for both TB and CWD just to line their pockets. If TWRA wants to import more elk, at least import some that meet TN import regulations in regard to disease issues so as not to endanger our wildlife and livestock. TWRA has brainwashed the TWRC and now all they see is the dollars signs, $$$$

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