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groovy mike's picture
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Stack on Gun Safes

Santa was good to me and brought me a Stack-On gunsafe I guess it was time, my closet was full! Based on the literature in the packaging it looks like a good product - fire and water protection. Doea anyone know the reputation of the company or products or have any experience dealing with them?

expatriate's picture
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Stack On Gun Safe

I've got one.  I've been pretty happy with it.  The company has a decent reputation, although they're mostly known for tool cabinets.

groovy mike's picture
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Any moisture problems?

expatriate wrote:

I've got one.  I've been pretty happy with it.  The company has a decent reputation, although they're mostly known for tool cabinets.

Thanks Expatriate.  SO far so good.  The combination works and I don't see anything wrong with it after unwrapping and filling it

Did you need to take any special precation against humidity inside?  My basement is usually dry.  I have been storing my rifles in a wooden cabinet in the same room where the safe is now with no moisture problem.  I haven't been planning on doing anything special beyond the normal light oiling to protect against moisture.  Do you think I need to invest in any sort of de-humidifier?

 

expatriate's picture
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Moisture

I'd definitely recommend putting a dehumidifier in there.  I haven't used the plug-in models, because they don't remove any moisture...they just warm up the inside a bit to prevent condensation on the contents.  They stop working if the power goes out, too.  I use silica gel packs -- same stuff the Air Force stuffs inside missile and cluster bomb caskets.  I use the ones made by Cabelas -- they make various sizes, have indicators to show when they are losing effectiveness, and are easily recharged by throwing them in the oven.  Whatever you do, don't use the dehumidifiers that use the calcium chloride in a can you open up.  Those collect liquid, and the liquid's pretty corrosive.

expatriate's picture
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Moisture

My apologies if I sound like I'm building you a watch.  But my opinion is that dessicants free me from doing the mental math over dew point, humidity, etc.  I also have a fire safe for valuables, and the instructions for that thing said that the insulation used to protect against fire released moisture over time...so they recommended putting a dessicant inside the safe.  I've had that safe for over ten years, and rarely go inside...and yet the dessicants still turn pink.

groovy mike's picture
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Thanks

expatriate wrote:

My apologies if I sound like I'm building you a watch.  But my opinion is that dessicants free me from doing the mental math over dew point, humidity, etc.  I also have a fire safe for valuables, and the instructions for that thing said that the insulation used to protect against fire released moisture over time...so they recommended putting a dessicant inside the safe.  I've had that safe for over ten years, and rarely go inside...and yet the dessicants still turn pink.

No apologies needed. I’m glad for all the advice that I can get. I figure that there is no need for me to make mistakes that someone else already has. I’m happy for the opportunity to learn from your experience. That’s why I asked for advice to start with. Feel free to keep it coming.

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