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South Dakota finds 25 more cases of Chronic Wasting Disease
  
Monday, February 28, 2011
  
South Dakota finds 25 more cases of Chronic Wasting Disease
 
  
Latest Chronic Wasting Disease Testing Results
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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As I have have said before I

As I have have said before I believe this will slowly continue to spread despite any and all efforts to stop it.

Just out of curiosity Flounder, this seems to be about the only topic you have interest in here. What is your interest in this based on? I know we are all interested but it seems a little stronger for you.

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I have to agree with you

I have to agree with you because if they can't even pinpoint how it spreads how are you going to control.  They have done suties where they have actually thought they sterilized the soil in certain tainment areas and the animals put back in there still comwe down with it.  Until it is determined how it spreads there will never be any way to stop it.

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tss reply to hunter25

i made a promise to my mom to stop the madness and find the truth. i don't care what you eat. this goes much further than the UKBSEnvCJD only theory. that theory only enhances the spread of TSE. ...

 

  
Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease autopsy case report 'MOM'
 
DIVISION OF NEUROPATHOLOGY University of Texas Medical Branch 114 McCullough Bldg. Galveston, Texas 77555-0785
 
FAX COVER SHEET
 
DATE: 4-23-98
 
TO: Mr. Terry Singeltary @ -------
 
FROM: Gerald Campbell
 
FAX: (409) 772-5315 PHONE: (409) 772-2881
 
Number of Pages (including cover sheet):
 
Message:
 
*CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE*
 
This document accompanying this transmission contains confidential information belonging to the sender that is legally privileged. This information is intended only for the use of the individual or entry names above. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying distribution, or the taking of any action in reliances on the contents of this telefaxed information is strictly prohibited. If you received this telefax in error, please notify us by telephone immediately to arrange for return of the original documents. -------------------------- Patient Account: 90000014-518 Med. Rec. No.: (0160)118511Q Patient Name: POULTER, BARBARA Age: 63 YRS DOB: 10/17/34 Sex: F Admitting Race: C
 
Attending Dr.: Date / Time Admitted : 12/14/97 1228 Copies to:
 
UTMB University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Texas 77555-0543 (409) 772-1238 Fax (409) 772-5683 Pathology Report
 
FINAL AUTOPSY DIAGNOSIS Autopsy' Office (409)772-2858
 
Autopsy NO.: AU-97-00435
 
AUTOPSY INFORMATION: Occupation: Unknown Birthplace: Unknown Residence: Crystal Beach Date/Time of Death: 12/14/97 13:30 Date/Time of Autopsy: 12/15/97 15:00 Pathologist/Resident: Pencil/Fernandez Service: Private Restriction: Brain only
 
FINAL AUTOPSY DIAGNOSIS
 
I. Brain: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant.
  
  
  
  
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
 
ENLARGING SPECTRUM OF PRION-LIKE DISEASES Prusiner Colby et al 2011
 
Prions
 
David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2
  
 
  
  
 
----- Original Message -----
 
From: David Colby
 
 
 
Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 8:25 AM
 
Subject: Re: FW: re-Prions David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2 + Author Affiliations
 
Dear Terry Singeltary,
 
Thank you for your correspondence regarding the review article Stanley Prusiner and I recently wrote for Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives.  Dr. Prusiner asked that I reply to your message due to his busy schedule.  We agree that the transmission of CWD prions to beef livestock would be a troubling development and assessing that risk is important.  In our article, we cite a peer-reviewed publication reporting confirmed cases of laboratory transmission based on stringent criteria. The less stringent criteria for transmission described in the abstract you refer to lead to the discrepancy between your numbers and ours and thus the interpretation of the transmission rate.  We stand by our assessment of the literature--namely that the transmission rate of CWD to bovines appears relatively low, but we recognize that even a low transmission rate could have important implications for public health and we thank you for bringing attention to this matter.
 
Warm Regards, David Colby
 
--
 
David Colby, PhDAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of Delaware
  
  
  
====================END...TSS==============
  
  
 
re-ENLARGING SPECTRUM OF PRION-LIKE DISEASES Prusiner Colby et al 2011 Prions
 
CWD to cattle figures CORRECTION
 
Greetings,
 
I believe the statement and quote below is incorrect ;
 
"CWD has been transmitted to cattle after intracerebral inoculation, although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). This finding raised concerns that CWD prions might be transmitted to cattle grazing in contaminated pastures."
 
Please see ;
 
Within 26 months post inoculation, 12 inoculated animals had lost weight, revealed abnormal clinical signs, and were euthanatized. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of a unique pattern of the disease agent in tissues of these animals. These findings demonstrate that when CWD is directly inoculated into the brain of cattle, 86% of inoculated cattle develop clinical signs of the disease.
  
  
  
  
  
  
" although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). "
  
 
shouldn't this be corrected, 86% is NOT a low rate. ...
 
kindest regards,
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518
 
Thank you!
 
Thanks so much for your updates/comments. We intend to publish as rapidly as possible all updates/comments that contribute substantially to the topic under discussion.
  
  
  
 
 
 
please see full text of my submission here ;
 
 
 
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
 
ENLARGING SPECTRUM OF PRION-LIKE DISEASES Prusiner Colby et al 2011
 
Prions
 
David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2
 
 
 
 
 
kind regards, terry
 
 
 
================END...TSS==============
 
 
 
Re: IS SCRAPIE TRANSMISSIBLE TO MAN ?
 
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
 
From: "Skip Jack" <Jack@cvm.msstate.edu>
 
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." <flounder9@verizon.net>
 
Sent: Monday, February 21, 2011 11:56 AM
 
Subject: Re: IS SCRAPIE TRANSMISSIBLE TO MAN ?
 
 
Terry, The "call for papers" is intended to encourage the submission of scientific articles (review or primary research) for publication next spring (2012).  While you present some interesting information, it is not in a suitable format for jounral publication.  If you wish to revise and perhaps expand upon your ideas, we will consider all submissions.
 
Thanks for your interest in Human-Wildlife Interactions a publication of the Berryman Insitutute.
 
swj __________________________________ S. W. Jack, D.V.M., M.S., Ph.D. Veterinary Medicine: Pathobiology & Population Medicine Forest Resources:  Berryman Institute P.O. Box 6100 Mississippi State, MS  39762 662/325-1311; FAX: 662/325-4548 __________________________________ "do what you love in service to those who love what you do." Aspire to inspire before you expire.
 
 
"Terry S. Singeltary Sr." <flounder9@verizon.net> writes: In the Spotlight: Call for Wildlife and Zoonotic Disease Papers
 
 
Posted: 17 Feb 2011 10:01 PM PST
 
Human-Wildlife Interactions Journal Dedicating Spring 2012 Issue to Wildlife Disease
 
Cover of the Fall 2010 Issue The peer-reviewed journal Human-Wildlife Interaction (a publication of the Berryman Institute) will dedicate the spring 2012 issue to wildlife diseases.
 
The "One Health" movement recognizes the close ties between human, animal and environmental health. Zoonotic diseases are an ever increasing concern to human health. Most emerging and re-emerging diseases are zoonotic and the most involve wildlife. But, the impact of wildlife disease is not just to health, but also the concern for environmental and economic impact.
 
They seek review papers on selected diseases and topics as well as primary research papers on either wildlife diseases or zoonotic diseases. Article submissions are due before April 1, 2011. For more information contact: S. W. Jack (662/325-1311 or [ mailto:jack@cvm.msstate.edu ]jack@cvm.msstate.edu).
 
[ http://wdin.blogspot.com/2011/02/in-spotlight-call-for-wildlife-and.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+WildlifeDiseaseNews+%28Wildlife+Disease+News+Digest%29 ]http://wdin.blogspot.com/2011/02/in-spotlight-call-for-wildlife-and.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+WildlifeDiseaseNews+%28Wildlife+Disease+News+Digest%29
 
 
My submission as follows ;
 
 
IS SCRAPIE TRANSMISSIBLE TO MAN ?
 
I believe that the assumption that Scrapie is not infectious to man, is just that, an assumption, one that should be proven, not assumed.  In my research of scientific studies on this matter, I have found that there is more science to show that indeed Scrapie is transmissible to man, than there is showing that it is not. The only problem is, scientist and the media refuse to acknowledge the science, and continue to go by a myth, and assume that it is not. This assumption could prove fatal in the long run. for how many, that is another assumption, but one that should be considered. ...
 
IN CONFIDENCE
 
reference...
 
RB3.20
 
TRANSMISSION TO CHIMPANZEES..........SNIP...END..........TSS
 
 
Wednesday, February 16, 2011 IN CONFIDENCE SCRAPIE TRANSMISSION TO CHIMPANZEES
 
IN CONFIDENCE
 
 
 
 
 
=========================END...TSS================
 
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----

From:

To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

Cc: ; ; ; ; ; ;

Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 9:13 AM

Subject: Re: re-THE ROLE OF PREDATION IN DISEASE CONTROL: A COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE REMOVAL ON PRION DISEASE DYNAMICS IN DEER

Dear Mr. Singeltary,

Thank you for taking time to read our publication and provide comments. Your concern and your keen attention to the literature on prion diseases are evident and laudable. We share your passion to increase knowledge of chronic wasting disease and to work toward decreasing occurrence of the disease. Open exchange of ideas and viewpoints is what keeps science moving forward.

Best, Margaret Wild

********************************************

Margaret A. Wild, DVM, PhD Chief Wildlife Veterinarian Biological Resource Management Division National Park Service 1201 Oak Ridge Dr., Suite 200 Fort Collins, CO 80525 Office: (970) 225-3593 Cell: (970) 214-2886 Fax: (970) 225-3585

----- Original Message -----

From: Dave Jessup

To: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

Cc: jwdwda@; margaret_wild@ ; krose@ ; wda@ ; WildlifeDisease@ ; Jenny_Powers@ ; rcarleton@
Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 9:41 AM

Subject: [Norton AntiSpam]Re: re-THE ROLE OF PREDATION IN DISEASE CONTROL: A COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE REMOVAL ON PRION DISEASE DYNAMICS IN DEER

Dear Mr. Singeltary,

Thank you for your e-mail and extensive appended snipets from various studies and sources on prion diseases. It appears you have cc'd your e-mail to the senior author of the article in JWD you are concerned about, Dr. Margaret Wild. So, I will leave it to her to correspond with you if she feels that is appropriate.

I am not sure what you are asking the Wildlife Disease Association to do about your concerns. WDA publishes peer reviewd scientific articles in our quarterly Journal of Wildlife Diseases (articles like Dr. Wild's). We also feature a Letters category of articles. These are very distilled observations as opposed to original research, and limited to 1000 words. If you wanted to distill down you conerns about potential prion tranmsmissability to canids and people, you might have a basis for such a letter. They are not the "did too, did not" type of letters to the editor that we might find in a newspaper and instructions on how to prepare one can be found at "Instructions to Authors" on our website.

It also appears that you have cc'd your e-mail to our Editor, Dr. Jim Mills, so he should be aware of your concerns and be looking for such a Letter, if you decide to write one.

I'm sorry for your loss and the suffering of your mother with JCD.

Sincerely,

David A. Jesup WDA Executive Manager

===========================================

 
FULL TEXT ;
 
 
 
Monday, February 14, 2011
 
THE ROLE OF PREDATION IN DISEASE CONTROL: A COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE REMOVAL ON PRION DISEASE DYNAMICS IN DEER Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 47(1), 2011, pp. 78-93 © Wildlife Disease Association 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
===========END.........TSS===========
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, February 01, 2011
 
Sparse PrP-Sc accumulation in the placentas of goats with naturally acquired scrapie
 
Research article
 
 
 

>>> In spite of the poorly defined effects of PRNP genetics, scrapie strain, dose, route and source of infection, the caprine placenta may represent a source of infection to progeny and herd mates as well as a source of persistent environmental contamination. <<<

Could this route of infection be the cause of the many cases of Goat scrapie from the same herd in Michigan USA ?

Has this been investigated ?

(Figure 6) including five goat cases in FY 2008 that originated from the same herd in Michigan. This is highly unusual for goats, and I strenuously urge that there should be an independent investigation into finding the common denominator for these 5 goats in the same herd in Michigan with Scrapie. ...

Kind Regards, Terry

 
 
SNIP...
 
 
Scrapie Nor-98 like case in California FY 2011 AS of December 31, 2010.

Scrapie cases in goats FY 2002 - 2011 AS of December 31, 2010 Total goat cases = 21 Scrapie cases, 0 Nor-98 like Scrapie cases (21 field cases, 0 RSSS cases)

Last herd with infected goats disignated in FY 2008 Michigan 8 cases

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/scrapie/downloads/monthly_scrapie_rpt.pps

UPDATED RESPONSE ON MY CONCERNS OF GOAT SCRAPIE IN MICHIGAN ;

----- Original Message -----

From: "BioMed Central Comments"

To:

Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:13 AM

Subject: Your comment on BMC Veterinary Research 2011, 7:7

Your discussion posting "Scrapie cases Goats from same herd USA Michigan" has been rejected by the moderator as not being appropriate for inclusion on the site.

Dear Mr Singeltary,

Thank you for submitting your comment on BMC Veterinary Research article (2011, 7:7). We have read your comment with interest but we feel that only the authors of the article can answer your question about further investigation of the route of infection of the five goats in Michigan. We advise that you contact the authors directly rather than post a comment on the article.

With best wishes,

Maria

Maria Kowalczuk, PhD Deputy Biology Editor BMC-series Journals

BioMed Central 236 Gray's Inn Road London, WC1X 8HB

+44 20 3192 2000 (tel) +44 20 3192 2010 (fax)

W: www.biomedcentral.com E: Maria.Kowalczuk@biomedcentral.com

Any queries about this decision should be sent to comments@biomedcentral.com

Regards

BMC Veterinary Research

 
 
SNIP...PLEASE SEE FULL TEXT ;
 
 
 

Tuesday, February 01, 2011


Sparse PrP-Sc accumulation in the placentas of goats with naturally acquired scrapie

 

 

Research article

 
END...TSS
 
 
 
P.S., you can't say i don't keep them busy thinking... or cussing one ;-)
 
 
 
Sunday, October 04, 2009
 
 
CWD NEW MEXICO SPREADING SOUTH TO TEXAS 2009
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, February 17, 2011
 
Environmental Sources of Scrapie Prions
 
 
 
 
Monday, February 28, 2011
 
South Dakota finds 25 more cases of Chronic Wasting Disease
 
Latest Chronic Wasting Disease Testing Results
 
 
 
 
 
Friday, February 25, 2011
 
Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
 
Chronic wasting disease spreads farther west in Alberta
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, December 29, 2010
 
CWD Update 99 December 13, 2010
 
 
 
 
Thursday, February 10, 2011
 
CWD ILLINOIS UPDATE FEBRUARY 2011 Locations of CWD-Positive Deer - Updated 2/07/2011
 
 
 
 
Thursday, February 10, 2011
 
Chronic Wasting Disease Found In A White-Tailed Deer In Maryland
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, February 09, 2011
 
CWD Minnesota deer feeding ban covering Dodge, Goodhue, Olmsted, and Wabasha counties will become effective Feb. 14, 2011
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011
 
Minnesota, National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has confirmed CWD case near Pine Island
 
 
 
 
Monday, February 14, 2011
 
THE ROLE OF PREDATION IN DISEASE CONTROL: A COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE REMOVAL ON PRION DISEASE DYNAMICS IN DEER
 
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 47(1), 2011, pp. 78-93 © Wildlife Disease Association 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, January 07, 2009
 
CWD to tighten taxidermy rules Hunters need to understand regulations
 
 
 
 
CWD, GAME FARMS, BAITING, AND POLITICS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, February 22, 2010
 
Aerosol and Nasal Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in Cervidized Mice
 
 
 
 
AS THE CROW FLIES, SO DOES CWD
 
Sunday, November 01, 2009
 
American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and potential spreading of CWD through feces of digested infectious carcases
 
 
 
 
Monday, July 13, 2009
 
Deer Carcass Decomposition and Potential Scavenger Exposure to Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 
 
 
SO, as i said, once established, it is very difficult to extinguish completely. the trading of cervids from state to state (legal and illegal), is another problem. deer urine scents is another problem, you have hunters that pour this stuff on themselves, and it's just plain stupid, from what science is telling us.
 
Sunday, December 06, 2009
 
Detection of Sub-Clinical CWD Infection in Conventional Test-Negative Deer Long after Oral Exposure to Urine and Feces from CWD+ Deer
 
 
 
 
THEN YOU have water that has been contaminated from a CWD-endemic area ;
 
Wednesday, October 14, 2009
 
Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area
 
 
 
 
ALSO, NOTE MINERAL LICKS A POSSIBLE SOURCE AND TRANSMISSION MODE FOR CWD ;
 
 
 
 
 
 
UPDATED DATA ON 2ND CWD STRAIN
 
Wednesday, September 08, 2010
 
CWD PRION CONGRESS SEPTEMBER 8-11 2010
 
 
 
 
 Saturday, January 29, 2011
Atypical L-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (L-BSE) Transmission to Cynomolgus Macaques, a Non-Human Primate
Jpn. J. Infect. Dis., 64 (1), 81-84, 2011
BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL
 
BMJ 1999;319:1312 (Published 13 November 1999)
 
Re: vCJD in the USA * BSE in U.S. 15 November 1999
 
Terry S Singeltary
 
 
BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL
 
BMJ 2000;320:8 doi:10.1136/bmj.320.7226.8/b (Published 1 January 2000)
 
U.S. Scientist should be concerned with a CJD epidemic in the U.S., as well...
 
2 January 2000
 
 
Vol. 285 No. 6, February 14, 2001
 
Letters
 
Diagnosis and Reporting of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
 
To the Editor: In their Research Letter, Dr Gibbons and colleagues1 reported that the annual US death rate due to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has been stable since 1985. These estimates, however, are based only on reported cases, and do not include misdiagnosed or preclinical cases. It seems to me that misdiagnosis alone would drastically change these figures. An unknown number of persons with a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in fact may have CJD, although only a small number of these patients receive the postmortem examination necessary to make this diagnosis. Furthermore, only a few states have made CJD reportable. Human and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies should be reportable nationwide and internationally.
 
Terry S. Singeltary, Sr Bacliff, Tex
 
 
DER SPIEGEL (9/2001) - 24.02.2001 (9397 Zeichen) USA: Loch in der Mauer Die BSE-Angst erreicht Amerika: Trotz strikter Auflagen gelangte in Texas verbotenes Tiermehl ins Rinderfutter - die Kontrollen der Aufsichtsbehördensind lax.Link auf diesen Artikel im Archiv: http://service.spiegel.de/digas/find?DID=18578755
 
"Löcher wie in einem Schweizer Käse" hat auch Terry Singeltary im Regelwerk der FDA ausgemacht. Der Texaner kam auf einem tragischen Umweg zu dem Thema: Nachdem seine Mutter 1997 binnen weniger Wochen an der Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Krankheit gestorben war, versuchte er, die Ursachen der Infektion aufzuspüren. Er klagte auf die Herausgabe von Regierungsdokumenten und arbeitete sich durch Fachliteratur; heute ist er überzeugt, dass seine Mutter durch die stetige Einnahme von angeblich kräftigenden Mitteln erkrankte, in denen - völlig legal - Anteile aus Rinderprodukten enthalten sind.
 
Von der Fachwelt wurde Singeltary lange als versponnener Außenseiter belächelt. Doch mittlerweile sorgen sich auch Experten, dass ausgerechnet diese verschreibungsfreien Wundercocktails zur Stärkung von Intelligenz, Immunsystem oder Libido von den Importbeschränkungen ausgenommen sind. Dabei enthalten die Pillen und Ampullen, die in Supermärkten verkauft werden, exotische Mixturen aus Rinderaugen; dazu Extrakte von Hypophyse oder Kälberföten, Prostata, Lymphknoten und gefriergetrocknetem Schweinemagen. In die USA hereingelassen werden auch Blut, Fett, Gelatine und Samen. Diese Stoffe tauchen noch immer in US-Produkten auf, inklusive Medizin und Kosmetika. Selbst in Impfstoffen waren möglicherweise gefährliche Rinderprodukte enthalten. Zwar fordert die FDA schon seit acht Jahren die US-Pharmaindustrie auf, keine Stoffe aus Ländern zu benutzen, in denen die Gefahr einer BSE-Infizierung besteht. Aber erst kürzlich verpflichteten sich fünf Unternehmen, darunter Branchenführer wie GlaxoSmithKline, Aventis und American Home Products, ihre Seren nur noch aus unverdächtigem Material herzustellen.
 
"Its as full of holes as Swiss Cheese" says Terry Singeltary of the FDA regulations. ...
 
 
 
 
Suspect symptoms
 
What if you can catch old-fashioned CJD by eating meat from a sheep infected with scrapie?
 
28 Mar 01
 
Like lambs to the slaughter 31 March 2001 by Debora MacKenzie Magazine issue 2284. Subscribe and get 4 free issues. FOUR years ago, Terry Singeltary watched his mother die horribly from a degenerative brain disease. Doctors told him it was Alzheimer's, but Singeltary was suspicious. The diagnosis didn't fit her violent symptoms, and he demanded an autopsy. It showed she had died of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
 
Most doctors believe that sCJD is caused by a prion protein deforming by chance into a killer. But Singeltary thinks otherwise. He is one of a number of campaigners who say that some sCJD, like the variant CJD related to BSE, is caused by eating meat from infected animals. Their suspicions have focused on sheep carrying scrapie, a BSE-like disease that is widespread in flocks across Europe and North America.
 
Now scientists in France have stumbled across new evidence that adds weight to the campaigners' fears. To their complete surprise, the researchers found that one strain of scrapie causes the same brain damage in mice as sCJD.
 
"This means we cannot rule out that at least some sCJD may be caused by some strains of scrapie," says team member Jean-Philippe Deslys of the French Atomic Energy Commission's medical research laboratory in Fontenay-aux-Roses, south-west of Paris. Hans Kretschmar of the University of Göttingen, who coordinates CJD surveillance in Germany, is so concerned by the findings that he now wants to trawl back through past sCJD cases to see if any might have been caused by eating infected mutton or lamb.
 
Scrapie has been around for centuries and until now there has been no evidence that it poses a risk to human health. But if the French finding means that scrapie can cause sCJD in people, countries around the world may have overlooked a CJD crisis to rival that caused by BSE.
 
Deslys and colleagues were originally studying vCJD, not sCJD. They injected the brains of macaque monkeys with brain from BSE cattle, and from French and British vCJD patients. The brain damage and clinical symptoms in the monkeys were the same for all three. Mice injected with the original sets of brain tissue or with infected monkey brain also developed the same symptoms.
 
As a control experiment, the team also injected mice with brain tissue from people and animals with other prion diseases: a French case of sCJD; a French patient who caught sCJD from human-derived growth hormone; sheep with a French strain of scrapie; and mice carrying a prion derived from an American scrapie strain. As expected, they all affected the brain in a different way from BSE and vCJD. But while the American strain of scrapie caused different damage from sCJD, the French strain produced exactly the same pathology.
 
"The main evidence that scrapie does not affect humans has been epidemiology," says Moira Bruce of the neuropathogenesis unit of the Institute for Animal Health in Edinburgh, who was a member of the same team as Deslys. "You see about the same incidence of the disease everywhere, whether or not there are many sheep, and in countries such as New Zealand with no scrapie." In the only previous comparisons of sCJD and scrapie in mice, Bruce found they were dissimilar.
 
But there are more than 20 strains of scrapie, and six of sCJD. "You would not necessarily see a relationship between the two with epidemiology if only some strains affect only some people," says Deslys. Bruce is cautious about the mouse results, but agrees they require further investigation. Other trials of scrapie and sCJD in mice, she says, are in progress.
 
People can have three different genetic variations of the human prion protein, and each type of protein can fold up two different ways. Kretschmar has found that these six combinations correspond to six clinical types of sCJD: each type of normal prion produces a particular pathology when it spontaneously deforms to produce sCJD.
 
But if these proteins deform because of infection with a disease-causing prion, the relationship between pathology and prion type should be different, as it is in vCJD. "If we look at brain samples from sporadic CJD cases and find some that do not fit the pattern," says Kretschmar, "that could mean they were caused by infection."
 
There are 250 deaths per year from sCJD in the US, and a similar incidence elsewhere. Singeltary and other US activists think that some of these people died after eating contaminated meat or "nutritional" pills containing dried animal brain. Governments will have a hard time facing activists like Singeltary if it turns out that some sCJD isn't as spontaneous as doctors have insisted.
 
Deslys's work on macaques also provides further proof that the human disease vCJD is caused by BSE. And the experiments showed that vCJD is much more virulent to primates than BSE, even when injected into the bloodstream rather than the brain. This, says Deslys, means that there is an even bigger risk than we thought that vCJD can be passed from one patient to another through contaminated blood transfusions and surgical instruments.
 
 
JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY
 
doi: 10.1212/01.WNL.0000036913.87823.D6 Neurology January 28, 2003 vol. 60 no. 2 176-181
 
MARCH 26, 2003
 
RE-Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United States
 
Email Terry S. Singeltary:
 
[log in to unmask]
 
I lost my mother to hvCJD (Heidenhain Variant CJD). I would like to comment on the CDC's attempts to monitor the occurrence of emerging forms of CJD. Asante, Collinge et al [1] have reported that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest sporadic CJD. However, CJD and all human TSEs are not reportable nationally. CJD and all human TSEs must be made reportable in every state and internationally. I hope that the CDC does not continue to expect us to still believe that the 85%+ of all CJD cases which are sporadic are all spontaneous, without route/source. We have many TSEs in the USA in both animal and man. CWD in deer/elk is spreading rapidly and CWD does transmit to mink, ferret, cattle, and squirrel monkey by intracerebral inoculation. With the known incubation periods in other TSEs, oral transmission studies of CWD may take much longer. Every victim/family of CJD/TSEs should be asked about route and source of this agent. To prolong this will only spread the agent and needlessly expose others. In light of the findings of Asante and Collinge et al, there should be drastic measures to safeguard the medical and surgical arena from sporadic CJDs and all human TSEs. I only ponder how many sporadic CJDs in the USA are type 2 PrPSc?
 
 
Newsdesk
 
The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 3, Issue 8, Page 463, August 2003
 
doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00715-1Cite or Link Using DOI
 
Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
 
Xavier Bosch
 
"My name is Terry S Singeltary Sr, and I live in Bacliff, Texas. I lost my mom to hvCJD (Heidenhain variant CJD) and have been searching for answers ever since. What I have found is that we have not been told the truth. CWD in deer and elk is a small portion of a much bigger problem." 49-year-old Singeltary is one of a number of people who have remained largely unsatisfied after being told that a close relative died from a rapidly progressive dementia compatible with spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). So he decided to gather hundreds of documents on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and realised that if Britons could get variant CJD from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), Americans might get a similar disorder from chronic wasting disease (CWD)-the relative of mad cow disease seen among deer and elk in the USA. Although his feverish.
 
 
 
 
2003
 
THE PATHOLOGICAL PROTEIN
 
BY Philip Yam
 
Yam Philip Yam News Editor Scientific American www.sciam.com
 
Answering critics like Terry Singeltary, who feels that the U.S. under- counts CJD, Schonberger conceded that the current surveillance system has errors but stated that most of the errors will be confined to the older population.
 
CHAPTER 14
 
Laying Odds
 
Are prion diseases more prevalent than we thought?
 
Researchers and government officials badly underestimated the threat that mad cow disease posed when it first appeared in Britain. They didn't think bovine spongiform encephalopathy was a zoonosis-an animal disease that can sicken people. The 1996 news that BSE could infect humans with a new form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease stunned the world. It also got some biomedical researchers wondering whether sporadic CJD may really be a manifestation of a zoonotic sickness. Might it be caused by the ingestion of prions, as variant CJD is?
 
Revisiting Sporadic CJD
 
It's not hard to get Terry Singeltary going. "I have my conspiracy theories," admitted the 49-year-old Texan.1 Singeltary is probably the nation's most relentless consumer advocate when it comes to issues in prion diseases. He has helped families learn about the sickness and coordinated efforts with support groups such as CJD Voice and the CJD Foundation. He has also connected with others who are critical of the American way of handling the threat of prion diseases. Such critics include Consumers Union's Michael Hansen, journalist John Stauber, and Thomas Pringle, who used to run the voluminous www.madcow. org Web site. These three lend their expertise to newspaper and magazine stories about prion diseases, and they usually argue that prions represent more of a threat than people realize, and that the government has responded poorly to the dangers because it is more concerned about protecting the beef industry than people's health.
 
Singeltary has similar inclinations. ...
 
 
 
 
2010
 
PLOS one
 
PLoS ONE 5(1): e8521. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008521
 
Human Prion Diseases in the United States
 
Robert C. Holman1*, Ermias D. Belay1, Krista Y. Christensen1, Ryan A. Maddox1, Arialdi M. Minino2, Arianne M. Folkema1, Dana L. Haberling1, Teresa A. Hammett1, Kenneth D. Kochanek2, James J. Sejvar1, Lawrence B. Schonberger1
 
1 Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-borne and Enteric Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, 2 Division of Vital Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Hyattsville, Maryland, United States of America
 
 
re-Human Prion Diseases in the United States
 
Posted by flounder on 01 Jan 2010 at 18:11 GMT
 
I kindly disagree with your synopsis for the following reasons ;
 
 
2010
 
14th ICID International Scientific Exchange Brochure -
 
Final Abstract Number: ISE.114
 
Session: International Scientific Exchange
 
Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009
 
T. Singeltary
 
Bacliff, TX, USA
 
Background:
 
An update on atypical BSE and other TSE in North America. Please remember, the typical U.K. c-BSE, the atypical l-BSE (BASE), and h-BSE have all been documented in North America, along with the typical scrapie's, and atypical Nor-98 Scrapie, and to date, 2 different strains of CWD, and also TME. All these TSE in different species have been rendered and fed to food producing animals for humans and animals in North America (TSE in cats and dogs ?), and that the trading of these TSEs via animals and products via the USA and Canada has been immense over the years, decades.
 
Methods:
 
12 years independent research of available data
 
Results:
 
I propose that the current diagnostic criteria for human TSEs only enhances and helps the spreading of human TSE from the continued belief of the UKBSEnvCJD only theory in 2009. With all the science to date refuting it, to continue to validate this old myth, will only spread this TSE agent through a multitude of potential routes and sources i.e. consumption, medical i.e., surgical, blood, dental, endoscopy, optical, nutritional supplements, cosmetics etc.
 
Conclusion:
 
I would like to submit a review of past CJD surveillance in the USA, and the urgent need to make all human TSE in the USA a reportable disease, in every state, of every age group, and to make this mandatory immediately without further delay. The ramifications of not doing so will only allow this agent to spread further in the medical, dental, surgical arena's. Restricting the reporting of CJD and or any human TSE is NOT scientific. Iatrogenic CJD knows NO age group, TSE knows no boundaries. I propose as with Aguzzi, Asante, Collinge, Caughey, Deslys, Dormont, Gibbs, Gajdusek, Ironside, Manuelidis, Marsh, et al and many more, that the world of TSE Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy is far from an exact science, but there is enough proven science to date that this myth should be put to rest once and for all, and that we move forward with a new classification for human and animal TSE that would properly identify the infected species, the source species, and then the route.
 
page 114 ;
 
 
kind regards,
terry
 
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Thank you for your response

Thank you for your response to my question. After reading all this it gives me a much clearer understanding of the situation and a lot more concerns about this disease and others like it.

I always read the posts you put up but did not understand the significance until now and your personal connection to it.

Good luck and I pray you will find the answers to your questions also.