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brokenarrow's picture
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Location: reno nevada
Joined: 01/18/2010
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spot and stalk

i like spot n stalk the sit and wait methode dont work to good in this open country in nevada.

Ca_Vermonster's picture
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Location: San Diego, CA
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.

brokenarrow wrote:

i like spot n stalk the sit and wait methode dont work to good in this open country in nevada.

 

I agree with Brokenarrow.  It's all about terrain, as far as I am concerned.  Also partly about what you are using, bow or rifle.......

numbnutz's picture
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Location: portland,oregon
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I prefer spot and stalk,

I prefer spot and stalk, although i do sit from time to time

Bugs Bunny's picture
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Location: Dunn County, Wisconsin
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I sit in tree stands.  Thats

I sit in tree stands.  Thats pretty much all I do.  Turkey hunting I move around some but not all that much. 

Hillside's picture
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Location: Sandy, Or
Joined: 09/20/2009
Posts: 32
Sit vrs stalk

Because of the thick forests of the PNW I generally find it dificult to hunt on the move. Not for the lack of being able to move slow enough, but rather quiet enough. If I spot an animal that I can watch while stalking I do, if the situation, wind and cover (or lack there of) is right.

I mostly rifle hunt from a tree stand on the west side, and my hunting grounds are mostly dougles fir, cedar and alder trees. My inability to keep quiet I will blame solely on the fallen alder leaves. ARGH, come October our rifle season is generally dry, and the stinkin' alder leaves blanket the ground. It's like walkin' on potato chips.

Anybody else share my frustration? Any tips you have found to minimize the CRUNCH?

However, I have discovered that if the good ole' Oregon drizzle starts to fall, it seems to bring the blacktails out to feed in numbers that do not compare to the best of dry day hunts.

You ever try to step on potato chips after pouring water on them? (hope not)

In the last several years I have managed to take 2 nice bucks while it was raining,  just the kind of day I would have passed on in prior years.

 

 

numbnutz's picture
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Location: portland,oregon
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I feel ya

Hillside wrote:

Because of the thick forests of the PNW I generally find it dificult to hunt on the move. Not for the lack of being able to move slow enough, but rather quiet enough. If I spot an animal that I can watch while stalking I do, if the situation, wind and cover (or lack there of) is right.

I mostly rifle hunt from a tree stand on the west side, and my hunting grounds are mostly dougles fir, cedar and alder trees. My inability to keep quiet I will blame solely on the fallen alder leaves. ARGH, come October our rifle season is generally dry, and the stinkin' alder leaves blanket the ground. It's like walkin' on potato chips.

Anybody else share my frustration? Any tips you have found to minimize the CRUNCH?

However, I have discovered that if the good ole' Oregon drizzle starts to fall, it seems to bring the blacktails out to feed in numbers that do not compare to the best of dry day hunts.

You ever try to step on potato chips after pouring water on them? (hope not)

In the last several years I have managed to take 2 nice bucks while it was raining,  just the kind of day I would have passed on in prior years.

 

 

Considering I live 13 miles away from you I do feel your frustrations. Thats why I hunt hte east side now. If I hunt the west side I can still move around but usally wait till late archery season.

GooseHunter Jr's picture
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I prefer spot and stalk.

I prefer spot and stalk.

hawkeye270's picture
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There is a time and place for

There is a time and place for both methods. A great way to combine both is to sit over a good stand hunting site (funnel, water source, trail etc) that is open enough that you can also glass a lot of area around it such as adjacent ridges. On many an occasion I have set over a spot in the morning to spot something on a ridge a half to 1.5 miles away and plan a stalk on it. 

Tshoote20's picture
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Location: Vancouver, Washington
Joined: 10/29/2010
Posts: 4
Sit and wait or spot and stalk

Well I have done them both. everytime i have "tried" just try to sit i always see a spot that looks like a little bit better vantage point and end up 2 miles or so from where i started. Big smile

I have been hunting the far east side of washington in the dayton unit where the only success i have had was actually from the truck heading out to hunt and the elk ran across the road and i ran after them and got my spike Dancing

i think if you have the patients to sit and wait then do so other then that slow spot and stalk method is the way. but this also depends on the terrain you are dealing with as well i think. heck i dont know. my elk season starts in a week so i am getting a little anxious.....

jaybe's picture
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Location: S.E. Michigan
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Be Flexible

I would say that a hunter needs to be flexible in his/her methods of hunting.

If you know of a good food source, whether a planted crop field, food plot or natural source of food, it may be best to sit and watch during feeding times.

In areas where the animals don't come into the openness of a food source, you may have to set your stand back into the cover 100 yards or so to be able to intercept them as they "stage", waiting for darkness to enter the open area.

Also, if you know of a water hole, river/stream crossing, saddle or some other spot that animals normally travel, that would be a good spot to take a stand.

If the animals are in heavy cover, however, or bedded in prime areas (North-facing slopes when it's hot; South-facing slopes when it's cold), then the better method would be to slowly move to where you can either glass these areas or at least move into/through them quietly in hopes of seeing your prey before they see you.

I am not real good at sneaking through hardwoods the way one of my hunting buddies is, but I have seen the results of being able to do this. I believe with practice - and probably a lot of mistakes along the way, I'll become better at being a more flexible (and more successful) hunter.

 

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