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CVC
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Single Shot Rifles?

Why do people use single shot center fire rifles - are they more accurate than rifles with mags?

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Look at it this way, how many

Look at it this way, how many shots does it take for you to bag your deer or elk?  One, two, or three?  Usually after the first shot the animal is on the run and the second and third shots are at a running animal.  I know that it is always intersting during the hunt when you hear one shot and then a few seconds later a second, third, fourth and a fifth and you can just picture the animal getting further and further away from the huner.  Not to mention running faster and faster to get away unless they hit it with the first shot and they are trying to finish it and missing it with all of their follow up shots. 

Also there is a slight challenge to using a single shot rifle.  You know that you only have one shot and will usually take the time to make sure that the one shot that you have is on the mark.  But with a little practice a second shot can come quite quickly if you need it. 

Now if you really want a challenge try a single shot pistole.  I have taken quite a few animals with a Thompson Center Contender.  Both mule deer and elk have fallen to it.  Now that is a fun time.  Not only do you have only one shot but you need to get within 100 yards for a good shot but I have taken them out to almost 200 yards dependin on the contitions and what round I am shooting in it. 

CVC
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You make a good point about

You make a good point about only needing one shot and that follow up shots are using just flinging lead.  I still wonder if a single shot improves accuracy since and this might not be the right term, it eliminates the rifle's action.  I know it is recomended to make sure the action is tightened properly or it can affect accuracy so I wonder if eliminating it improves accuracy?

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I personally don't believe

I personally don't believe that a single shot is any more accurate than a bolt action rifle.  I have a Ruger #1 in 22-250 that will punch a 1/4" hole into paper all day at a hundred yards but my cousin has a Remington 788 in the same caliber that will put them into the same hole shot after shot.  So I wouldn't say that they are any more accurate and in a lot of instances a bolt action will win out over them all the time. 

CVC
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Okay, so if the single shot

Okay, so if the single shot is not more accurate then why opt for a single shot over the multiple shot rifle?  Yes, as you say, a good second shot is not always an option, but it still is an option so why not have it available? 

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Some people just like the

Some people just like the challenge of a singel shot rifle.  It is a lot like why do shome hunters use a long bow or a recurve when a compound is available?   One of the advantages that I see with a single shot is the it is shorter than a bolt action since you elimate the action part of the rifle and start right at the chamber.  So right there you get rid of 5 or 6 inches in the over all length of the rifle.  Not to mention you shave off a few ounses off of the weight. 

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Thanks for the reply. You

Thanks for the reply. You make sense about the pro's of a single shot.  Thanks.

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simple explaination.

In general, the less moving parts, the more stable the shooting platform.  With less moving parts, the tighter the mechanism. It only goes to show that a simple, single-shot model is, in general, the most accurate style of weapon.  A bolt action comes very close to a single shot.  There are basically two type of actions used for a single-shot rifle, the break action and the bolt.  Neither have very many moving parts so their tolerences can be much tighter than other actions.  Repeating rifles were not designed for accuracy but to put more lead into the air in a given time.  The acceptance of repeating rifles comes from the military's theory of mass distruction regardless of the cost of ammunition.  Since most people were originally introduced to hunting by someone with a military background and that surplus military weapons are readily available, the illusion that repeating weapons are superior to the single-shot platform came to be..  This is the reason why most people do not practice shooting as much as they should.  The idea of having a second or third shot readily available to them makes most people think that they are good marksmen.

If you look back in military history to find the weapon that NEEDED to be the most accurate, the sniper rifle, you will find that nearly all of them are based on a single-shot bolt action platform.  When one shot accuracy is needed, most military experts realized that this was the best format.   The military establishments around the world have influenced the platforms of hunting weapon for good or bad.

Having hunted for over 40 years with many different types of guns and different firing platforms, I believe my own gun collection reflects my views.  The most complicated platform I own is a lever action Model 94 Winchester which was given to my girlfiend by her father as a keepsake.  All other weapons that I own are either single-shot break actions or bolt action military surplus weapons.  I very seldom need to make a follow-up shot on anything I hit, and I seldom miss what I am aiming at.  I must admit that I do keep in mind the fact that I have a reduced cycling time for a second shot, so I do pass on shots that may be somewhat questionable.  My father, who taught me to shoot, always reminded me when shooting, Aim small; Miss small.  Single shots premote marksmanship and that is why I used those platforms almost exclusively. 

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thanks for the explanation. 

thanks for the explanation.  You confirmed what I was guessing.  Very informative post.

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where did you get this from??

Scruffy D Wolf wrote:

In general, the less moving parts, the more stable the shooting platform.  With less moving parts, the tighter the mechanism. It only goes to show that a simple, single-shot model is, in general, the most accurate style of weapon.  A bolt action comes very close to a single shot.  There are basically two type of actions used for a single-shot rifle, the break action and the bolt.  Neither have very many moving parts so their tolerences can be much tighter than other actions.  Repeating rifles were not designed for accuracy but to put more lead into the air in a given time.  The acceptance of repeating rifles comes from the military's theory of mass distruction regardless of the cost of ammunition.  Since most people were originally introduced to hunting by someone with a military background and that surplus military weapons are readily available, the illusion that repeating weapons are superior to the single-shot platform came to be..  This is the reason why most people do not practice shooting as much as they should.  The idea of having a second or third shot readily available to them makes most people think that they are good marksmen.

If you look back in military history to find the weapon that NEEDED to be the most accurate, the sniper rifle, you will find that nearly all of them are based on a single-shot bolt action platform.  When one shot accuracy is needed, most military experts realized that this was the best format.   The military establishments around the world have influenced the platforms of hunting weapon for good or bad.

Having hunted for over 40 years with many different types of guns and different firing platforms, I believe my own gun collection reflects my views.  The most complicated platform I own is a lever action Model 94 Winchester which was given to my girlfiend by her father as a keepsake.  All other weapons that I own are either single-shot break actions or bolt action military surplus weapons.  I very seldom need to make a follow-up shot on anything I hit, and I seldom miss what I am aiming at.  I must admit that I do keep in mind the fact that I have a reduced cycling time for a second shot, so I do pass on shots that may be somewhat questionable.  My father, who taught me to shoot, always reminded me when shooting, Aim small; Miss small.  Single shots premote marksmanship and that is why I used those platforms almost exclusively. 

 Change: My previous remarks were rude and have been removed. I have sent an apolgy to Mr. Wolf and I'd also like to extend my apologies to the other forum members as well. It will not happen again!

Thanks,Ed

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you are welcome

It is just what I have learned in the past 40 years and is just my opinion.   One obvious thing that I didn't point out was, that no matter how good a gun is, it's accuracy is determined by one important factor, the experience of the person shooting it.

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