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hawkeye270's picture
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Shot angle affect in archery

It seems like rangefinders that adjust for angle are all the rage right now. It just doesn't seem like there would be that much of an effect at normal bow distances. To be shooting at 45 degrees it would feel like the animal was right above or below you. How big of an affect does angle have on archery shots?

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The angles do make a

The angles do make a difference, for example. I set my 3d target up at 40 yards on a 12 degree angle uphill I shot like it was a 40 yard shot and missed right under it. i ranged it and it said 40 yrds but aim as if 46 yrds. i did and bullseye. both uphill and down hill angles will affect your aim point and my rangefinder give me an accurate reading so i can make a better shot. It could be the differenece in wounding an animal or making a lethal shot.

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am i mistaken

numbnutz wrote:

The angles do make a difference, for example. I set my 3d target up at 40 yards on a 12 degree angle uphill I shot like it was a 40 yard shot and missed right under it. i ranged it and it said 40 yrds but aim as if 46 yrds. i did and bullseye. both uphill and down hill angles will affect your aim point and my rangefinder give me an accurate reading so i can make a better shot. It could be the differenece in wounding an animal or making a lethal shot.

I was under the impression that angles decrease the amount of holdover required regardless of if the shot is up or down. Is this not correct

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n

thats what i thaught too atleast with bullets, but i did what my rangefinder told me to do and my shot was dead on.

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Agreed... if you can afford a

Agreed... if you can afford a rangefinder that will do the math for you then go for it!

The parabolic equation for the arc of a projectile is:

s=vt-1/2at^2

But this only takes into account initial velocity, gravity.  It does not account for wind drift, which affects arrows tremendously because of their long shafts and weight forward mass.  It also does not account for imperfections in your release, cam tilt, angle of trajectory, etc.

There are some basic rules of thumb that make it easier than all of this... add or subtract X yards for every Y yards of distance, bla, bla, bla... but really an electronic doo-dad that can do the thinking for you while you're already imagining the steak on your plate and the mount on your den wall... priceless.

It sucks a lot to know exactly how far away a 6 point bull is... only to shoot over his back because the angle of the shot combined with the arc of your arrow trajectory meant you should have adjusted to the next pin...

Happened to my cousin.  He went to Cabelas and bought a new rangefinder that day.  I inherited his old one.  he he hehehe

Location: From Grand Junction CO, stationed in Germany
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The difference is...

There is a huge difference in what yardage you should shoot for depending on the angles. You are right about aiming for a shorter distance when shooting up or down hill. It all has to do with the affect of gravity on the arrow over the horizontal distance. Line of sight to the target may be 40 yards but with a 30 degree angle on the shot the horizontal distance would only be about 35 yards. Here are a couple pictures to represent this.

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hawkeye270's picture
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ya

Archery_hunter33 wrote:

There is a huge difference in what yardage you should shoot for depending on the angles. You are right about aiming for a shorter distance when shooting up or down hill. It all has to do with the affect of gravity on the arrow over the horizontal distance. Line of sight to the target may be 40 yards but with a 30 degree angle on the shot the horizontal distance would only be about 35 yards. Here are a couple pictures to represent this.

That is how I thought it worked. I have read that the affect is the same regardless of if the shot is up or down.

CVC
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The horizontal distance is

The horizontal distance is always going to be less, not more.  I don't have a compensating range finder so this is what I do.  I often take ranges while on the ground standing at my tree stand.  Later when I am in the tree, I simply range points straight across from me for reference points.  I range a tree straight across and then down by the base where the deer will be.  At twenty or thirty yards the most of a difference I've seen is one or two yards.  Really not enough for me to worry about with my bow.  It is pretty flat shooting at those distances so it doesn't matter if it is 18 or 20 yards, I am basically aiming at the same point anyway.

Steeper angles will affect the difference more.  When I shot my mountain goat at a 70 degree angle there was a big difference between actual and ranged distance.

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