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Joined: 03/03/2009
Posts: 3
shooting practice

I will be going to Colorado this fall for my first elk hunt. I am new to big game hunting. I have been a birddog guy all my life, but decided to give this a try. I bought a Weatherby Mark V chambered 300 weatherby. I will do as much shooting and excercise as possible this summer to get ready. The 180 grain hunting lodes go for $65 to $75 a box! I was wondering if it would make much difference if I shot targets with the 150 grain spire points instead. I can get them for about $45 a box. I figure that shooting targets at 100 to 300 yards will not make a substantial difference. I will shoot the hunting lodes closer to my trip. What do you think? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

exbiologist's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 09/19/2008
Posts: 2399
shooting practice

Thats a good strategy, a better strategy would be to reload them at $10 per box. But what you have in mind is probably the best way to go if you won't reload. That's a difficult gun to get used to if you haven't done a lot of centerfire rifle shooting, so shoot as much as you can afford.

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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
shooting practice

With a centerfire rifle. I recommend always sighting-in and practicing with the same loads that you hunt with. Various loads and bullet weights will impact the target at different levels and have different drop rates. Experimenting with different loads at the shooting range isn't something I'd consider to be shooting practice, it's simply experimenting. If you stick with the same loads then there is not likey to be any surprises with your ammo when you hunt. To me constantly switching loads and bullet weights for one species of game animal just leads to constant adjusting of your scope and hold-over on target at various distances and causes more confusion, frustration, and variation than it's worth.

Once you get your rifle/scope sighted-in on a benchrest, then move to practicing with your selected load off-hand shooting in various positions and distances. Doing so will give you a much better picture of what your capabilities are before heading out into the field, it also makes you a better shot in the field as well.

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Location: eastern Washington
Joined: 03/02/2009
Posts: 40
shooting practice
WesternHunter wrote:
With a centerfire rifle. I recommend always sighting-in and practicing with the same loads that you hunt with. Various loads and bullet weights will impact the target at different levels and have different drop rates. Experimenting with different loads at the shooting range isn't something I'd consider to be shooting practice, it's simply experimenting. If you stick with the same loads then there is not likey to be any surprises with your ammo when you hunt. To me constantly switching loads and bullet weights for one species of game animal just leads to constant adjusting of your scope and hold-over on target at various distances and causes more confusion, frustration, and variation than it's worth.

Once you get your rifle/scope sighted-in on a benchrest, then move to practicing with your selected load off-hand shooting in various positions and distances. Doing so will give you a much better picture of what your capabilities are before heading out into the field, it also makes you a better shot in the field as well.

I tottally agree if you plan on hunting with the 180 shoot the 180 it will make a BIG difference the 150 will shoot alot different

Location: Richfield, Utah
Joined: 11/26/2008
Posts: 64
shooting practice

Shoot the same load to sight in as the ones you will be hunting with. With the 300 WM zero at 300 yards. the gun will brop about 8 at 400 and 22 at 500 give or take. It is a great caliber. With a good scope you should be able to sight in with about 10-15 rounds and then pick up one more box for the hunt. Reloading is best in the 300 WM.Good luck and have a great time.

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Location: Colorado Springs
Joined: 02/23/2009
Posts: 182
shooting practice

I think your strategy is fine. Shooting the lighter loads will get you used to shooting your new rifle and help break it in. The recoil and point of impact will be different with the 180's, but for practicing, the 150's will get you to where you'll be comfortable shooting the Weatherby. I've known several guys who loaded heavier grain bullets "light" to get used to their rifle before starting to develop a hunting load. They did just fine when they went hunting with their hunting load. Just remember, shoot at least 3 or 4 boxes of the 180's before you go on your hunt. This wil allow you to zero with the 180's and get used to the difference between them and the 150's. Just my 2 cents.

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Joined: 01/22/2007
Posts: 120
shooting practice

As suggested above, the point of impact can change dramatically between different bullets. In fact I even get as much as 6" difference in POI at 100 yards using the same bullet and changing the make of powder in my loads. So don't think all 180gs will shoot the same. Or that a 150g will hit the same point as a 180.

But shooting the gun lots will help you learn to shoot a rifle. So shoot the 150's to get used to shooting a magnum rifle, and before the hunt sight in with the bullet you choose to hunt with.

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