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Location: eastern Washington
Joined: 03/02/2009
Posts: 40
Savage 111 ?s

I shoot a savage 111 in a 270 with burris fullfield2 balisticplex 3x9 I am looking to make it more accurate at a distance. I am curious about stocks and possibly a trigger, this is a pre accutrigger rifle. I comfortably shoot to 350 but would like to take it a little further without buing a new rifle because I have had this rifle for years and I love it.

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Location: Mobile County, Alabama
Joined: 09/09/2007
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Savage 111 ?s

See reply in other thread.

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Joined: 10/19/2008
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Savage 111 ?s

Check out. www. sharp shooter supply.com

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
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Savage 111 ?s

I don't know how well your rifle shoots now but shooting well at longer distances is often a product of truely learning shooting disaplines and properly adjusted equipment.

First I have never heard of anyone using a 270 for accuracy. Not that they can't be but competatively speaking, the bullet's are designed for hunting. But if your rifle will give 1" or under constant group's @ 100, it should shoot well at farther distances. The difference is in how you use it.

One of the first things I'd look at is the scope. I don't know if Burris makes target turret's for it and for me that would be a must. To shoot well out where the point of aim is well over the point of impact, you need to be able to adjust the point of aim to be the same as point of impact. To use kentucky windage is a romantic idea but judging what 15" look's like at some long distance is guesstimating, that doesn't work all that well. You are now entering a world where you really take shooting to a new level. Good long range scope's also have a paralex adjustment on the scope. The average hunting scope is a marvel that it does so well here as it does but as the range increases you want to be able to adjust with it. I have read that some long range shooter's use the scope to judge wind. If you adjust it for half the distance to the target, you can see heat waves moving in the scope. That's whatever wind is blowing moving the air. I have tried this and I need a lot of work!

Another thing you didn't mention is the bedding of your rifle. Little bedding problems that might not show that much at 100yds, increase magnificently at long range. Consider what a minute of angle is. We describe it as 1", really a bit more. Well minute of angle at 500yds is 5". If your scope moves your point of impact 1/4" at 100yds, at that 500yds it will move it 1 1/4". We are still talking minutes of angle. So a bedding problem that causes you only 1/2" at 100yds, not a lot, will cause you about 2 1/2" at 500yds. I believe that the best component's in the world put together by the most carefull loader in the world will only be as good as the shooter AND THE BEDDING OF THE RIFLE! There are not really any deap dark secret's, just the science of shooting.

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Location: Texas
Joined: 08/13/2009
Posts: 37
Savage 111 ?s
Don Fischer wrote:
I don't know how well your rifle shoots now but shooting well at longer distances is often a product of truely learning shooting disaplines and properly adjusted equipment.

First I have never heard of anyone using a 270 for accuracy. Not that they can't be but competatively speaking, the bullet's are designed for hunting. But if your rifle will give 1" or under constant group's @ 100, it should shoot well at farther distances. The difference is in how you use it.

One of the first things I'd look at is the scope. I don't know if Burris makes target turret's for it and for me that would be a must. To shoot well out where the point of aim is well over the point of impact, you need to be able to adjust the point of aim to be the same as point of impact. To use kentucky windage is a romantic idea but judging what 15" look's like at some long distance is guesstimating, that doesn't work all that well. You are now entering a world where you really take shooting to a new level. Good long range scope's also have a paralex adjustment on the scope. The average hunting scope is a marvel that it does so well here as it does but as the range increases you want to be able to adjust with it. I have read that some long range shooter's use the scope to judge wind. If you adjust it for half the distance to the target, you can see heat waves moving in the scope. That's whatever wind is blowing moving the air. I have tried this and I need a lot of work!

Another thing you didn't mention is the bedding of your rifle. Little bedding problems that might not show that much at 100yds, increase magnificently at long range. Consider what a minute of angle is. We describe it as 1", really a bit more. Well minute of angle at 500yds is 5". If your scope moves your point of impact 1/4" at 100yds, at that 500yds it will move it 1 1/4". We are still talking minutes of angle. So a bedding problem that causes you only 1/2" at 100yds, not a lot, will cause you about 2 1/2" at 500yds. I believe that the best component's in the world put together by the most carefull loader in the world will only be as good as the shooter AND THE BEDDING OF THE RIFLE! There are not really any deap dark secret's, just the science of shooting.

Couldn't have put that better if I tried. Long range shooting is MATH, and lots of it. There are a LOT of factors that you HAVE to understand if you are going to push out to ranges past 400yds. However, it's not that hard to learn. Just spend some time at the range and MAKE SURE you are documenting all of the dope on each and every shot!!!!!

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