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Location: Canada
Joined: 12/26/2006
Posts: 323
Remote Country

as moeggs.............howdy! There is some exceptional elk hunting in BC in the Kootenay's and up the Alaska Highway in the Prophet /Muskwa country. There are parts of the Kootenay's that are too accessible by residents due to logging and mining, but a good outfitter will be getting you into the back country with horses and a long way from the nearest road and beyond the hunters with backpacks. Lets face it there is only so far a backpack hunter can go into the backcountry and still reasonably expect to pack an elk out. Horses get you and your gear beyond that and get your elk out.

The northern elk hunting area from the Dawson Creek country north has some fantastic wilderness country. Here again the secret is horses. You need to get beyond the backpackers and any large rivers or bodies of water that can handle jet boats and float planes. Once you do this you have the country to yourself.

Alberta has some good elk spots, but it is harder to get away from people. Alberta has 60% of all the horses in Canada......that means even on pack trips you will run into other pack trips in a lot of places. Lots of horse people and lots of residents that pack in hunting, much more so than BC.

As for hunting south of the border..........I have done a bit. I have hunted in Washington, Oregon, Texas, Colorado and numerous times in Montana and Wyoming. I have not hunted in Idaho. How does it compare? Well, way more hunters to be honest. Here again, I find perceptions depend on where you come from............my idea of too many hunters may seem like the wide open spaces to other guys.

I do recall being in Colorado's high country one time and we were at a trail head and it was filled with trucks and empty stock trailers. It was a gong show. In eastern Oregon the elk hunting was a zoo. Some nice country...but hunters everywhere and the elk were all on big private ranches.

All in all my best experiences state side have been by paying for access to private land. A good friend who lives in Lewiston, Idaho and would go on pack trips every year for elk has quit going. He found that there were too many people accessing the backcountry now and he no longer found it enjoyable.........he has also been commenting on the lack of game/wolf problems.

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Joined: 01/22/2007
Posts: 120
Remote Country

As I understand it. Hawks Rest in Yellowstone Park is the Most Remote site in the lower 48 states. It's a 25-28 mile hike or horse ride in from Turpin Meadows. But being the most remote, doesn't mean you will be alone.

It's a very popular area for packers to pack into and camp during the summer. and of course their is no hunting or guns allowed in the park. Remote in this case just means it is the farthest point away from a road or any kind.

I have a good friend in South Eastern Utah. He says he can ride his horse out his back door and go 40 miles before he hits a fence or road.

Maybe you just need to take up Desert Big Horn or Desert Mule deer hunting if you really want to get away from others.

I can remember in the 70's thinking I needed to get all the hunting done I could because it would be all gone in 10-15 years. Looking back now, I see Utah's Elk hunting is actually much better now than it was in the 70's. The biologist have learn a few things about managing the elk herd and have actually improved the elk hunt.[/img]

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Location: Canada
Joined: 12/26/2006
Posts: 323
Remote Country

I have indeed seen vast chunks of Utah and Nevada, etc with very few people. but then again you needed a quarter section per cow to keep them fed, the ranches are huge. Unfortunately, you need to draw for those sheep and mule deer.......which is not an easy task.

I do no think there is a problem with too few elk anywhere these days (except for where there are wolf problems). Every place I have ever hunted elk has way more elk now than it did 35 years ago when I started hunting them. I think the issue here is quality of the hunt.

About 20 years ago I was guiding for mountain caribou on a certain mountain range. There were no lakes big enough to get hunters in on floats and it was 16 miles by horse to base camp, then another 30 to the spike camp from which you hunted the caribou.

Today you can drive right to the edge of the alpine on a logging road. There are logging blocks cut here and there among the pines that took a couple of hundred years to grow at that altitude and those blocks will be an eye sore for long into the next generation of hunters. Caribou are still there, but they had to close the logging roads to motorized transport by hunters. So you still need to ride or walk in, but everyone else can drive. Your packstring needs to be broke to logging trucks and idiots who don't have enough sense not to scream by your horses on a gravel road at 60 MPH.

When you get to the alpine country all the hikers can drive to the end of the road and hike around with gay abandon. You can still get a caribou or a moose if you work at it and then pack it 30 miles back down the logging road on your horse, but the quality of the hunting in that area is LONG GONE........unless of course the only thing in a hunt that matters to you is killing something.

Location: Utah
Joined: 02/24/2003
Posts: 596
Remote Country
Painted Horse wrote:
I have a good friend in South Eastern Utah. He says he can ride his horse out his back door and go 40 miles before he hits a fence or road.

If you are going to bring Utah into it then I believe the best place in Utah is Uinta High Wilderness area. I'm not saying it would compete with the Idaho or Montana wilderness areas but this is a true wilderness. The elk hunting is pretty good too.

"456,705 acres are included in the wilderness. The Uinta Mountains were carved by glaciers from an immense uplift of Precambrian rock. Some of this rock is exposed as colorful quartzite and shales. The main crest of the Uinta Mountains runs west to east for more than 60 miles, rising over 6,000 feet above the Wyoming and Uinta Basins to the north and south. Massive secondary ridges extend north and south from the crest of the range, framing glacial basins and canyons far below. This rugged expanse of peaks and flat-top mountains is the largest alpine area in the Intermountain West and is the setting for Kings Peak, the highest peak in Utah. Hundreds of picturesque lakes, streams, and meadows are nestled within beautiful basins. Cold, clear rivers plunge from the basins into deep canyons that form the headwaters of Utah's major rivers.

The Uinta Mountains rise from 7,500 to 13,528 feet at the summit of Kings Peak, offering diverse habitat for a wide variety of flora and fauna. Above treeline, tundra plant communities thrive in the harsh climate of the highest altitudes. Thick forests of Engelmann spruce, subalpine fir, and lodgepole pine blanket the land below treeline. These forests are interrupted by park-like meadows and lush wetlands. In the lower elevations, aspen groves and countless mixed species offer contrast to the scene. The Uinta Mountains are home to: elk, mule deer, moose, mountain goats, coyotes, black bears, bighorn sheep, ptarmigan, river otter, several species of raptor, pine marten, and cougar, to name a few."

There are a few visitors to this area but it's remote enough that a few people die every year getting lost up there. That's a sad fact but it does show how remote this area is.

I make a visit every year, very beautiful country.

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Location: Canada
Joined: 12/26/2006
Posts: 323
Remote Country

Very pretty! I am a little rusty on this but isn't that where the bison are on draw? I could be wrong.

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Location: michigan
Joined: 01/11/2007
Posts: 19
Remote Country

Thanks for the info folks. So many places to hunt/visit, so little time and money! I have hunted areas around Fairplay, Vail, and Silverthorne Colorado for elk and have been hooked since. Considering 1400 feet of elevation is high for me, I'm usually awe struck for the first day or two when I do get out west. Man, you guys are lucky!

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Location: Idaho
Joined: 06/01/2004
Posts: 1068
Remote Country

Back to the Uintas … they really intrigue me. Posted below is a pic taken in late May 2005 as we were driving by. Looks like January. I understand that was a record snow year. Someday I would like to climb around in the Uintas.

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Location: Somewhere Up There
Joined: 01/06/2007
Posts: 217
Remote Country

There are infinite places that fit the bill if you've got good legs and aren't afraid to use them. I've been to more remote places in the West than most (I'm and ex Forest Service Smokejumper) and there really is a lot of land and game out there if you're savvy enough to get around in those places. You'd be surprised at the unknown hunting grounds out there, but they do require a lot of effort. There's really no limit and the number of people you encounter is proportionate to the effort you put into getting back into the rough stuff.

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Location: Idaho
Joined: 06/01/2004
Posts: 1068
Remote Country

Highflyer ... as an ex-smokejumper perhaps you know my dad or have read his book: Two-Man Stick (Bud Filler). He jumped out of McCall. He is alive and well in S. Idaho. I think I acquired all of his love for the outdoors - sometimes I wish I acquired all of his business skills. He owns Filler King Company - prominent manufacturer of glued-laminated timber (beams and columns) and timber decking. Very successful. We both got bighorn sheep in 04.

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Location: Somewhere Up There
Joined: 01/06/2007
Posts: 217
Remote Country

I know the book and the name, and I'm glad a lot of those guys have taken the time to tell their stories - glad he is doing well.

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