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Joined: 11/14/2006
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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

I may be getting into reloading for my BAR .270 but I need to get some more information on what is required in order to reload first and the general costs expected to really get into it.

1. What hardware is required for reloading?
I have seen tons of reloading hardware to measure weight of gunpoweder, trimming shells, tumbling etc... What is really required and what is mostly novelty stuff?

2. If you had to purchase all new reloading equipment today what would you purchase? What brands, models etc...

3. Where would you start reloading for a BAR Safari .270. What powder, bullets, weights etc...
I hear the H4831 works great because it's a slower burning powder, but will this negatively impact an autoloading BAR?

Basically I am looking at getting into reloading so that I can shoot in a cost effective manner. I don't mind spending a reasonable amount of money to get the right equipment but I also don't want to go too far overboard since I'm not looking to get into competition type accuracy(I just want my MOA ). Ease of use is also a concern. I want something that is simple and easy to do. Why take 12 steps to reload when the same thing can be accomplished in 4.

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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

First you're going to need a Press. Don't get a cheap one, but a used one is fine,RCBS has a lifetime replacement warrant on all their products.
Secondly a set of scales
A set of 270 dies
A set of calibres
A few other things like case lube,deburring tool,loading block,shell holder to start with.Not expensive items.
A Reloading manual is a must. Then you will need primers,powder and bullets.
I would contact a shooting club in your area and express your interst in reloading, I bet you will get lots of assistance.
Reloading for a semi auto is no big deal. You have to trim the case length back about .010 or a bit more from the maximum overall length. You can also buy a set of dies specifically for auto loaders
There will be lots of help here on BGH for any problems you may encounter, just ask, if no reply, Scream
eye roll eye roll eye roll

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Joined: 11/14/2006
Posts: 68
Reloading .270 Hardware questions

Here is a list of the presses that I found that seemed to be ideal for what I was looking for. What do you think of these? Some are pretty expensive but if they ideally make it faster and easier they may be worth the additional price. Not to mention they come with different equipement.

RCBS Turret Press($168):
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0031380215...

RCBS Deluxe Turret reloading kit($320):
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0031380215...

Lee Deluxe Turret reloading kit($80):
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0032404215...

Hornady Lock-N-Load AP($350):
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0031363215...

I have one more question that has been bothering me a bit as well...

Do you have to measure out the gunpowder on the scale for each shell? Or is that simply used to calibrate the tool used to load the shells?

I should also point out that the Hornady reloader includes 10 boxes of bullets(not sure how many bullets are in a box lol).

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

100 bullet's to the box. You are in a fog. I'd recommend the Lee Anniversary kit. Don't do a progressive at least until your real sure of what your doing. A single stage press slows you down and forces you to think a little.

I'd reccomend the Lee kit because everything you'll need is there. Maybe not a trimmer and you will need one of them. It's an inexpensive set and you can use the money you save for a good manual, bullet's powder and primers. I got my son one years ago for his first set up. He's still using it. I don't think it's anywhere near the best but it does do everything you need and you can upgrade later. Remember this, all your going to do is resize cases, add new powder, primers and bullet's and shoot them. That does not take a lot! I use a Rockchucker and really don't need all the leverage I have.

First thing to do no matter what you end up getting, get a manual first. And read it. I don't have a new one but lot's of guy's praise the Lyman manual. I have two or three old one's , a Speer, two Noslers, two Hornady's and an older Sierra. I use mostly the Hornady and the new Nosler.

I'm not sure about loading for thr BAR but some auto's require what is called a small base shell holder, don't ask why as I've never loaded for an auto.

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Joined: 11/14/2006
Posts: 68
Reloading .270 Hardware questions
Don Fischer wrote:
100 bullet's to the box. You are in a fog. I'd recommend the Lee Anniversary kit. Don't do a progressive at least until your real sure of what your doing. A single stage press slows you down and forces you to think a little.

I'd reccomend the Lee kit because everything you'll need is there. Maybe not a trimmer and you will need one of them. It's an inexpensive set and you can use the money you save for a good manual, bullet's powder and primers. I got my son one years ago for his first set up. He's still using it. I don't think it's anywhere near the best but it does do everything you need and you can upgrade later. Remember this, all your going to do is resize cases, add new powder, primers and bullet's and shoot them. That does not take a lot! I use a Rockchucker and really don't need all the leverage I have.

First thing to do no matter what you end up getting, get a manual first. And read it. I don't have a new one but lot's of guy's praise the Lyman manual. I have two or three old one's , a Speer, two Noslers, two Hornady's and an older Sierra. I use mostly the Hornady and the new Nosler.

I'm not sure about loading for thr BAR but some auto's require what is called a small base shell holder, don't ask why as I've never loaded for an auto.

Being slowed down is part of what I am trying to avoid. I want something that is quick and easy. I can easily shoot two boxes or more in a sitting and I would like to shoot fairly regularly. That is a lot of reloading. The Price on the Lee is looking good but honestly I really don't know what else I need if I get any one of these kits.

I did some reloading years ago when I lived with my Unlce for a bit but I don't recall much of it and didn't do it but once or twice. But I am looking for a system where I can sit down and pump out 40-100 shells relatively quickly once I get the hang of it. If one of the more expensive units would allow me to make 100 shells in half the time that it would take me while using the Lee set then it very well may be worth the extra cost to me. I know I won't be able to go quickly until I get use to the setup and determine the exact load I want. But it's much easier to go at my own pace with a fast system than it is to try and speed up a slow system.

Here is another sytem I found that I was liking the function and features in...

Lee LoadMaster($330):
http://www.gunaccessories.com/Lee/Presses/LoadMaster.asp

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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

The RCBS Deluxe Turret reloading kit($320): can be used as both single stage and progressively, from the product description(not sure of the others)
I have a new powder measurer sitting in the box for three decades. I prefer to weigh every charge seperately, I don't trust them to be precise with each charge,each and every time.
A single stage/progressive press combo would certainly give you the best of both worlds.

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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

hostage,

I would strongly advise you to reconcider. At this stage for you, it is not important to crank out 40 to 100 rounds as quick as possible. It IS important to learn to asymble good SAFE rounds. Like Hammer, I measure every charge, have been doing that for about 40yrs! You must realize that you are messing with some very high pressures here. Handloading is a very safe hobby. But it can also turn a rifle into a bomb. My advice remains the same. First get a reloading manual and read it.

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Location: Colorado
Joined: 11/09/2005
Posts: 166
Reloading .270 Hardware questions

I don't wish to sound like a curmudgeon, but I think you need to reconsider reloading. Frankly, unless you count your time as completely worthless, it will be almost impossible to save money. That is especially true when reloading a cartridge like the .270, which is readily available in dozens of different loadings, at relatively inexpensive prices. You can almost certainly buy ammunition at Wal-Mart cheaper than you can make it.

Good luck, whatever you decide.

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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

Here's a link i found with some good reading, but it doesn't replace a good manuel by any means.

http://www.three-peaks.net/reload.htm

It is true that factory ammo is fairly cheap for the bottom of the line product. You don't get the best bullet(projectile) The loads are about 25 % less in velocity and energy than can be obtained from reloading(This is mainly for safety reasons as the manufacturer has no way of ascertaining the quality of firearm being used)BUT you can have the benefit of using the best of the best for the same price or a bit less.
And nowhere is it written that you must sit at a bench for seveal hours straight. Quite ofen I will resize,reprime and trim cases and set them aside for charging and bullet seating later.
As Don wisely said, weigh every charge. You'd be surprised how quick you can do it .I simply have a bowl filled with powder, a teasspoon and a powder trickler(for disspensing a kernel or two at a time) Probably weigh and charge two or three shells in a minute if I wanted to.
Just a few things for your consideration

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Reloading .270 Hardware questions

Im in total agreement with Hammer, Weigh them out....Ive been reloading for more years than I care to count and I still do it by the case...I have a Hornady Powder dispencer that I like alot but I STILL weigh each one...Ive cought a few times a 2 or even 3 grain difference and that means ALOT when you are loading to full cup tolerances...It really could mean your Life or the life of someone next to you at the bench. Reloading is safe to an extent but its not a game that you get a "redo" if you goof up. Its serious business when it comes to safety. If I see someone I dont personally know and trust next to me at the bench using reloads...I move a couple down. Ive seen breech blows before and its not a pretty picture....And YES I AM trying to scare you...Speed isnt something that you should care about in reloading...Accuracy and SAFETY are your main goals. Speed will come woth practice just like anything else. Good luck.

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Location: Wa.
Joined: 03/31/2004
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Reloading .270 Hardware questions

If you just want some quick loads. Buy a 100pcs of brass, the bullet you want and have a shop, that reloads, set them up 50 at a time. Trade the 50 empties for 50 fresh. You'll almost always have rounds ready. They can usually have them the next day. They will even make suggestions on loads. It may be less expensive than setting up a progressive system.

If you're going for accuracy and/or consistancy. Take your time and do it up right. One at a time.

When I load. I find the load that serves my intent and load it accurately each time. You won't get consistant perfection from any loads unless each and every component is identical in each and every round.

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