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Location: Missouri/Arkansas
Joined: 08/21/2003
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recoil comparison

Zippy! That doesn't inspire confidence!

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Location: Colorado
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recoil comparison

The 25 ft*lb's is about right for a 300 win mag; however the comparison to the 20 gauge is not quite right. You can have 25 ft*lb or more of recoil with a 20 gauge, but it usually runs around 14 or 15 ft*lbs.

The kick of a shot gun is dependant on the amount of shot you have in it. Usually if you have .875 oz of shot the kick is not going to reach 25 ft*lb. So to figure out how hard your 20 gauge was kicking you need to know how much shot you had in it. It might have been 25 ft*lb, but probably was not.

Generally, I have found a 300 kicks harder than a 12 gauge, which kicks harder than a 20 gauge with typical boxed loads. The critical word there is "typical", because you can make a 12 or 20 gauge kick hard much harder than a 300 win mag (especially the 12 gauge) with the right loads.

Foot pounds is a strange unit, but you can get a visual like this: 25 ft*lb of energy is exactly a 2.5 lb weight dropped from a height of 10 feet. Like wise 50 ft*lb is 5 pounds dropped from 10 feet.

Better watch out there Zippy240sx, pay back is always sweet. Wink

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Location: Missouri/Arkansas
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recoil comparison

With 3-inch magnum shells, firing loads at 1275-1300 fps, you're getting belted with about 60.8 ft-lbs in a typical 7 1/2 lb shotgun, 12 gauge. This is about the same as the recoil of a 378 Weatherby Magnum, this hits even harder than a typical 458 Winchester Magnum. This is elephant-gun recoil we're talking about!

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recoil comparison

Yeah you can make the 12 gauge kick hard.

Last night I was fiddling with some numbers trying to come up with a better comparision than "2.5 lb weight dropped from 10 feet".

Well here are some numbers. According to this site a human punch delivers around 35 Joules of energy (to get that number they assume what works out to be a 1.5 lb hand flying at 22 miles/hour or so).

35 Joules of energy is 47.5 ft*lb. So 60 ft*lb is considerable more than a human punch.

I'm not sure that I quite believe the 22 miles/hour though, I figure most people punch faster than that. Consider that an average high school baseball player can throw a ball at 70 miles/hour, so their arm is at least moving 70 mph..... Course most people don't punch like they throw a ball, so who knows.....

Anyway 25 ft*lb is considerable less than a human punch (probably), but 60 ft*lb is getting thumped pretty good. Oh and you can see from the numbers that Zippy took a pretty good shot to the mouth. Wink

[ This Message was edited by: bitmasher on 2003-09-17 22:52 ]

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Location: Nebraska
Joined: 08/21/2003
Posts: 72
recoil comparison

Well I know what a 12 gauge kicks like and I think its a lot more than a 300 win mag but never mess up your 12 gauge ammo kuz I took one of thouse to the face too. When i was younger somone put a 3 1/2 inch xx magnum shell into a Remington model 1100 made for as we know a 2 3/4 inch round that one really did take me to the ground and blew up the reciver. Im still in trouble over that kuz it was my uncles favorite trap gun.

So please dont go messin with your ammo trying to see what kicks more or less through a gun as you my damage the gun.

AKA
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Joined: 09/19/2003
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recoil comparison

Greetings. I'm brand new to this forum. I shoot a 300 weatherby but the recoil has never bothered me. I guess growing up using a 12 Ga. broke me in for the recoil. I also shoot a 378 weatherby with the muzzle break. It's just like the 300 weatherby. But without the break the recoil does get your attention but its still not that bad..Just my thoughts

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Location: Missouri/Arkansas
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recoil comparison

That's still a lot of gun, I shoot a 300 Weatherby Magnum too, I like to take it in small doses to avoid the possibility of developing a flinch.

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Joined: 09/21/2003
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recoil comparison

I've recently gotten into some big bore shooting. I started with a 6.5 lb. .444 Marlin. Eventually I found I could shoot 50 rounds with only a t-shirt on and Winchester's little rubber "recoil" pad. The trick is in the hold. Shooting from a bench, I grip the forearm and rest my hand on sandbags. From there I place my elbows to support the shot and tense up the muscle on my shoulder. Just a little bit is enough. When doing this, I don't hit the clavicle and prevent the butt from digging in where it is unwelcome. This also helps with accuracy because the hold is consistent; there is only one spot that feels right. I just shot my new .338 RUM this weekend and used the same technique. I used a sissy pad for this and was so scared on the first shot I flinched four inches to the right. But guess what, not really much worse than the .444. The 700 BDL with scope is about 8.5 pounds and the round uses slower powder. It "pushes" more than kicks; albeit harder than the .444. I used the same technique, but this time called 20 shots good enough. One Barnes X load (the max in the book) put three 225 grain rounds into .8 inch at 100 yards.

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Location: Missouri/Arkansas
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recoil comparison

Good shooting!

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Joined: 08/15/2003
Posts: 34
recoil comparison

ok,
so how does the recoil of the 300 win mag compare with the 300 wsm ?