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Location: Richfield, Utah
Joined: 11/26/2008
Posts: 64
Premium Bullet Madness

Bullets are like anything else. You get what you pay for. Match the bullet to your game. Then look at what range you will shoot the animal at. Go and Chart out your bullet at the altitude and do the math. When I guide someone on a tag that took the 10-15 years of their life to draw and is most likely a once in a lifetime hunt I recommend they purchase premium ammunition. If they show up with a junk gun, scope or ammo then they shoot our company gun. We will practice a lot prior to their hunt. For 200 yard deer sized game most bullets will work.

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Location: Montana
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Premium Bullet Madness
hightopoutfitter wrote:
Bullets are like anything else. You get what you pay for. Match the bullet to your game. Then look at what range you will shoot the animal at. Go and Chart out your bullet at the altitude and do the math. When I guide someone on a tag that took the 10-15 years of their life to draw and is most likely a once in a lifetime hunt I recommend they purchase premium ammunition. If they show up with a junk gun, scope or ammo then they shoot our company gun. We will practice a lot prior to their hunt. For 200 yard deer sized game most bullets will work.

Same with me, More exspensive Nosler rounds are nothing compared in cost to a bad hunt

7mm Magnum's picture
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Location: Custer, Michigan
Joined: 03/16/2008
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I agree with what the majority of folks are saying here.

1. shot placement is the most important aspect in hunting.

2. finding the the ammo combination that CONSISTENTLY performs
the best out of your weapon.

There has been only one time in the 40+ years that I have been hunting that I have ever recovered a projectile from a harvested animal. I was using handloads with the Hornady 162 grain BTSP that I had made up specifically for whitetail deer. it was a medium load and was only producing about 2,300fps and the deer was 218 yards from me when I took him. He dropped on the spot and when I got up to him I rolled him onto his back to dress him out and there it was laying in the grass on the ground. After doing the deed of dressing out and taking him home I weighed out the recovered projectile and found that it still retained 154.3 grains of weight and was mushroomed perfectly.

As far as I'm concerned that was the PERFECT round for that sized game at that distance. It did the job of dumping its energy totally within the animal and just barely had enough omph to make its exit. That round is now, as it has been from that point forward, what I use for whitetails a plain jane boatail spire point.

Elk hunting is a different story,.. Partitions, and Barnes TSX boattails are my current lineup for the bigger, thicker skin and boned critters. I am trying out the Accubond and Interbond lineup this spring at the range to see just how they will perform out of my rifles and will take it from there. Thumbs up

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Joined: 09/13/2008
Posts: 59
Premium Bullet Madness

Regular cup and core jacketed lead filled bullets seem to have worked very well on deer over the years however many have found that the similar but premium Nosler Partition penetrates deeper on heavy animals yet expands well.

Thus some premium bullets are good at times.

On another forum it has been pointed out that solid copper bullets with hollow points such has the Barnes X bullets can fail to expand at all if the hollow point is folded in some from say a feed ramp or handling.

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Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
Premium Bullet Madness

What was that bullet recovered in? It seems that it would have gone straight through a game animal if it didn't mushroom at all. It is documented, however, that there is an issue with the barnes with regard to this and that is one of the reasons for the tipped variety.

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Location: Colorado
Joined: 09/19/2008
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When you look inside the nose of that bullet, there's something granular that doesn't look like it was ever inside an animal. I'm not saying it couldn't be, but it sure doesn't look like it to someone who's shot a few animals. I don't know if that's sand or gelatin that was mixed with too much powder, not enough water. But it doesn't look like fat or bone to me. Also, if it didn't expand, I'd expect it to completely penetrate the animal, unless it was shot at 1,000 yards, in which case nothing would expand.

One other neat story. I shot a deer once with a winchester ballistic silvertip out of my .280 in Texas at 250 yards. Bang, flop, dead deer. But the funny thing was, a year later I was on that same sendero about 300 yards past where the deer was standing, and I found the bullet jacket, minus the lead core from that deer. I know for a fact it was out of my .280, as it had that the Lubalox coating on the bullet jacket and I was the only one shooting those loads. The jacket was just laying on top of the ground.
I wish I didn't misplace it in the several time I've moved since. But I was incredibly surprised with how far the jacket traveled without the lead core. In fact, I''m very surprised it even exited the deer.

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Location: Nova Scotia
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Premium Bullet Madness
exbiologist wrote:
When you look inside the nose of that bullet, there's something granular that doesn't look like it was ever inside an animal. I'm not saying it couldn't be, but it sure doesn't look like it to someone who's shot a few animals. I don't know if that's sand or gelatin that was mixed with too much powder, not enough water. But it doesn't look like fat or bone to me. Also, if it didn't expand, I'd expect it to completely penetrate the animal, unless it was shot at 1,000 yards, in which case nothing would expand.

I agree and to add to that the bullet is bent to one side which makes me want to believe it was shot in to a sloped backstop (maybe a sand pit?) Hard to judge performance on game under those circumstances. If it was used on game it shouldn't have stayed inside the animal for recovery.

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Location: Arizona
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Looks to me like that damage was caused by impact with something hard, vice hydrostatic pressure associated with tissue.

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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
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JJ Hack on Graybeard has collected a ton of bullet's from African game, a great many TSX's. He loves the TSX but he also found they didn't always open and he had one go in and end up under the hide on the side it went in on!

As for the bending and the stuff inside the bullet, it might have been picked up as it entered, some type of dirt. The bending of long skinny bullet's was the main reason W.D.M. Bell quit using the 6.5 on elephants or so I read. A long skinny bullet certainly might bend if it encountered enough resistence.

I don't think Barnes ever acknoledged the reason for the plastic tip but Winchester sure did with their bullet!

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Joined: 09/13/2008
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Premium Bullet Madness

That non expanded X bullet was shot into an elk and found in its rear leg.

There is a significant discussion at 24 hr campfire that those mono hollow point bullets are not reliable in terms of expanding.

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