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hawkeye270's picture
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Paying by inches of antler

It seems that there are a lot of ranches that charge their hunters by the size of the animal that they end up harvesting. Say if a hunter wants to bag a red stag that scores up to 260 SCI than it might cost $3500. But if they want to get one that scores up to 300 it will cost him $5000. It just seems like a strange way of going about hunting. I think part of the allure is the chance that you might run across something huge. But if you go on one of these hunts, you are limited to what you can take by the size of your wallet. I don't know... just seems a little weird.

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Paying for inches of antlers !

Hawkeye,

I know you are talking about Red Stags and such, but what is really sad, is the fact that they even do that right here in Colorado fo deer and elk. The unit your brother took his bull in has several outfitters that charge that way. If your brother had hunted one of these places with his tag he would have had paid in the nieghborhood of $6,000.00 and another $3,000.00 for killing a 340" bull.

Pretty sad to think people pay this sort of thing and do not get the experience that your brother did when he took his bull.

Now I do not have anything against this type of hunt, but when you accomplish something like that on your own, it is priceless !

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i too dislike the practice of

i too dislike the practice of charging extra based on size/length/width/etc.  i have hunted most of my exotics near home (just 50 miles away--not too far in texas)  and he has only one charge regardless of size.  that is why i will patronize him again over other places, even if the price is a bit better at the other place as i know i do not have a chance for a "big one", should the opportunity offer.  my red stag hunt in new zealand was based on a score=fee, but it had a range of about 40 inches for each fee change, and since the guide underestimated my stag, i got away with a big one for the lesser fee.lol

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I understand but don't like it

I undertand why they would do that on a ranch style sytem where the land owner has some control over the herd.  But I don't like it either.  Fair chase hunting should be for anything that you can successfully stalk.  No if you sign up for a 'management' hunt and you know that going in, then that is all well and good.  But it would stink to have teh buck of a lifetime walk out and not be able to shoot it because your cash flow was tight.

Still it is not far from some African hunting where you buy a general license for the area and pay the daily guide fee but then add a trophy fee for anything you shoot. 

Basically, there is an open season on everything that you see.  It is just a question of whether you want to pay $50 for a baboon or $10,000 for an elephant etc. On my ten day African hunt, I had to quit hunting on day 5 because I had bagged everything I had come for and just couldn't afford to take another trophy.  I had plenty of opportunity to hunt more, but couldn't pay the additional trophy fees if I did take anything.    

But I have no complaints!  I was HAPPY to have filled my tags early as opposed to hunting until the end and not filling them!

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It's kind of funny and sad at

It's kind of funny and sad at the same time.  I saw a hunting show where the guy was on a management hunt, but accidently shot a "trophy".

Well, you guessed it, he had to dish out a couple thousand ectra dollars for the trophy fee.

I don't like it either, but out of curiosity, is it any different than getting fined for shooting too SMALL an animal????

I don't like the whole trophy hunting philosophy anyway, but I am just wondering.

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When you are on a private

When you are on a private ranch you abide by what the management says, plain and simple.  I would bet that the guy that shot that trophy buck had a guide with him that told him witch deer to shoot and then he (the hunter) decided to shoot the other one. 

I have a friend that manages a bison herd in New Mexico and takes hunter out for their bison hunt.  There you pay for what the animal is and it is decided before the hunt even takes place.  So if you only want to pay a small fee and only want to shoot a small bison that is all you pay for.  Likewise if you want a trophy animal that is what you pay for.  So they took a hunter out that wanted a trophy animal.  The got him into a herd that contained some smaller yearling  bulls and one real nice bull.  Guess what?  The hunter shot one of the yearling bulls even thoe he had paid for a trophy animal.  The ranch managers stance on it was that he shot the animal that he wanted and if he wanted to shoot another one then he had to fork over some more money.  The hunter didn't listen to the guide and decided on his own on witch one to shoot and he did. 

Remember when you pull that trigger there is no accident on what you are aiming at or what ends up going down in the end. 

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Something Has Changed

It may be just me, but I for one feel that paying that kind of money for the head of an animal to put on the wall has gone way over the top.

I recently commented on the question of one of our members who was asking about coming to the midwest to hunt the "huge whitetails" that we have here.

I checked a couple of "pay-per-deer" ranches here in Michigan and discovered Shock! that you can pay anywhere from $2850 TO $18,000 for a deer, solely dependent on size, of course.

I know that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", but I guess I don't see the real beauty in looking at trail cam pictures (as well as front, back and side view stills), deciding which animal you can afford, then being driven to the spot where that animal hangs out so you can put it down.

Something has changed when hunting comes to that, and I'm not convinced that it is for the better.

 

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paying by inches

jaybe wrote:

It may be just me, but I for one feel that paying that kind of money for the head of an animal to put on the wall has gone way over the top.

Something has changed when hunting comes to that, and I'm not convinced that it is for the better.

I agree with you 100%!

It used to be that if you did your homework, hunted hard, and had a little luck, you could kill a very respectably animal.  Maybe with a lot of luck you could kill one that would make the record book.

Then it became a rich man's game.  I have been a member of Safari Club International almost since it started.  They have done and do a lot of good work for hunting.  However, my biggest complaint about them, and I believe that they are a major factor in this inches obsession, is their Awards Program with Slams, Top ten's, Inner circles, whatever.  It's not the best hunter that achieves these awards, it's the guy who's willing to pay the most.

I also blame the mass of outdoor TV shows that we have today.  Viewers (myself included) would rather watch a show where the hunter kills a 200" buck than watch a show where the hunter kills a two year old forkhorn buck.  So the show pays big dollars to kill bigger bucks to get higher ratings. 

Landowners who used to let you hunt on their land if you asked, now lease their land to outfitters who charge big bucks to hunt big bucks.  Other landowners have seen that with quality game management they can grow larger antlered animals for either themselves or for guided hunters.  But this management costs.  The more you spend, the bigger the bucks will be.   It becomes a vicious upward spiral. 

Although I have not seen it in their annual Awards booklet, I have heard that SCI has a separate "Estate" category for animals killed in High fenced Game farms.  Some of these high fenced properties are legitimate hunts.  Others are like shooting fish in a barrel. 

If I could be "King for a day" I would proclaim that the only animals that could qualify for Boone & Crockett, Pope & Young, or the general SCI record books would be animals killed on public land or private land that is open to hunting without a trespass or trophy fee, and that no animal killed on a guided hunt that charged "by the inch" could qualify for these record books.

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I'd vote for you to be that

I'd vote for you to be that king, but I don't think you would win. frown

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