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arrowflipper's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2011
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In or Out?

Have you ever just stepped into the field and had that big buck suddenly materialize out of nowhere?  You haven't been hunting more than ten minutes and there he is.  You raise your rifle and look through the scope, only to find it fogged over due to condensation.  No, it's not on the inside; the vapor is on the outside.

I have a question.  When you know it's going to be very cold out when you start hunting, do you leave your rifle where it's warm and dry or do you leave it in the cold (and dry)?  I've experienced the condensation issue when I step out into the cold and my scope instantly fogs over for a short time.  As soon as it becomes the same temperature as the outside, the fog disappears and I'm back in business.  It has nothing to do with the quality of your optics... it's just a condensation issue.  Maybe you don't expect to see animals for the first half hour or so, but if you do, do you ever think of this issue?

Inside or Out?

Critter's picture
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Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 3889
I have always left my rifle

I have always left my rifle outside in the truck but when you are hunting out of a cold camper or a tent it really doesn't make any difference. 

In all my 40+ years of hunting I have only had one problem with not being able to see through a scope and that was after walking a couple of miles through the oak brush that was covered with snow.  I came over the crest of a hill and there was a nice buck, when I threw up the rifle the objective lens was covered with snow and the buck trotted away. 

I learned since then to check the scope quite often for snow or even that light haze of fog on the lenses and to clean them before it is needed. 

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3173
I've had it happen a long

I've had it happen a long long time ago. I was hunting bears up behind Lakeside, Mont. Saw a bear start up the hill below me and he got about 50 yards away and gave me a great shot. Threw up my rifle and nothing but frost. Don't know what made it do that. I still have that scope and it is my favorite. Never has done it again.

groovy mike's picture
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Joined: 03/19/2009
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Always in

I've never left my rfle out.  Somehow that just seems like begging for someone to steal it, or worse - use it against me!  EEK!  Help!

hunter25's picture
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Location: Colorado western slope
Joined: 11/13/2009
Posts: 3021
I have never had the

I have never had the situation you described happen with my scope but have had it happen a time or two with my binoculars as I sometimes have them tucked inside my jacket and then fogged up when hitting the cold air. The only time I had a chance at a good buck that soon after leaving my truck the weather was just too warm out to cause any problems. But for the record I usually leave my gun in the truck during hunting season as I don't live in a normal neighborhood and have no problems with people in the area. I drive my car to work and then jump in the truck when I get home and take off.

I do also use an anti fog cleaning spray that came with my Zeiss scope that has worked very well.

Tndeerhunter's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2009
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out

I routinely leave my rifle(s) in my truck during hunting season (for just this reason) and have also left them outside the tent in tent hunts as well. I've not had a problem except once when I breathed at the wrong moment as I raised my rifle to aim at a buck. Bigtime fogging on the ocular lens! I managed to still see the buck through the "haze" and the .35 Whelen did what it always has, right after that. Yes

As already mentioned, there are products available to help prevent fogging (I have used them) and I have also been known to use "Rain-X" on my scope's lenses as well. Bushnell Elite scopes have a proprietary coating called "Rainguard" on them to prevent fogging or water droplets from forming. I own several and have most mounted on my "bad weather' rifles with no problems. I also use a pop-open objective cover in bad or rainy weather too. But, I don't leave them on at all times.