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SGM
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Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 08/13/2011
Posts: 916
That is why I really like

That is why I really like this site, all the help and honest answers to folks who ask. Great points about wearing the packs and covering up the orange and water. If you dig a little in old posts you will find threads on food/meals, ideas about camps, weather, etc. All that info will help you plan your hunts and make them more enjoyable. The 2012 big game regulations should be out about mid February so dig into them so you can get your tags and/or start to build your preference points.

buckykm1's picture
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Location: Vicksburg, Mi
Joined: 11/24/2010
Posts: 337
Fanny Pack

I use a large fanny pack with shoulder straps, the Cabela's Guide Model, it works great for a day pack, it is 1,300 cu in, and holds everything i need for the day. and i have a pack frame at camp to get my Elk out with.

Kevin

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Location: Fruita Colorado
Joined: 02/02/2009
Posts: 1946
Backpack

First of all welcome to BGH ! Thumbs up I myself am a backpack wearer when hunting elk and my choice of packs is the Eberlestock x-project EXC. It has the gun scabbard and the bow carrier. The best part of it is the fact that the gun scabbard fits my Remington Scendero (7MM RUM) with everything on it.

The other guys have already suggested some great stuff to carry in your pack. Good luck with your hunt.

Quinton

GooseHunter Jr's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 09/28/2005
Posts: 3743
This past season I used a

This past season I used a Eberlestock X2 pack.  It worked great compared to mt Badlands 2200.  The badlands packs is so much wider that I could not confrontably carry my rifle.  And too boot the Badlands pack is a bit heavier.  While I did not get a chance to try out a quater on my X2 pack I did strap alot of weight onto to it before the season and I am confident that I could carry out the first load with it with no problems.  It has what they refer to as a meat shelf and it works great.  I have a external frame pack to haul out the rest of the meat.

As far as what I carry:, food, extra knife,saw, some first aid stuff, water, rubber gloves, stocking hat extra gloves, food and snacks, knife sharpner, rain jacket( maybe the pants depending on the weather), extra ammo, maps, extra batteries.  may sound like alot but its really not and I spend the whole day out and rarely make it back to camp for lunch.

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Location: Colorado
Joined: 07/13/2011
Posts: 864
During hunting I never have

During hunting I never have what someone might call lunch. That would bog me down and make me tired. I would rather snack all day. It keeps my energy up without the tired feeling of eating too much at once. I bring a lot of protein bars and fruit. If I bring a sandwich i'll just eat 1/2 of it at a time. Usually, I snack every 1 1/2 to 2 hours, and make sure I drink lots of water. Never ever waiting until i'm thirsty. That would be too late. 

I can hunt from dawn to dusk with this method. Making sure that I don't eat too much at once. You don't want all the blood going to your stomach to digest too much food. You need to keep the blood in your brain and muscles.

hardwoods's picture
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Joined: 05/29/2011
Posts: 21
Good Question

Lots of great ideas already  -This was previously mentioned but zip ties are almost as useful as duct tape. I mainly use it to attach the game tag when needed but they also come in handy to fix alot of items in a pinch & are extremly light weight. Also i prefer a pack with straps on top rather than a zipper so you can easily strap in a jacket or sweatshirt when shedding layers.

Location: From Grand Junction CO, stationed in Germany
Joined: 08/01/2010
Posts: 534
If you are going to use a

If you are going to use a pack,  Eberlestock is the way to go.  I use the  Eberlestock J34 Just One.

BikerRN's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2011
Posts: 676
Daypack

I am quickly discovering that hunting almost requires two packs, unless backcountry hunting as a backpacker, but that's a whole 'nother can of worms.

I use this as my daypack:

http://www.eberlestock.com/introducing_the_x__project.htm

I plan to purchase one these for hauling out quarters:

http://www.kelty.com/p-272-cache-hauler-frame-only.aspx?category=backpacks

I've been really impressed with the Eberlestock pack and don't think I could design a better daypack for what I use it for. It's a lot of bang for your buck in my opinion. I compared the Kelty pack with a cheaper off brand version today, at the local hunting supply store, and came away convinced that the $30 more for the Kelty was well worth the extra money. Kelty also makes a bag that attaches to the frame for those backpack hunts.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
cache hauler

BikerRN wrote:

I am quickly discovering that hunting almost requires two packs, unless backcountry hunting as a backpacker, but that's a whole 'nother can of worms.

I use this as my daypack:

http://www.eberlestock.com/introducing_the_x__project.htm

I plan to purchase one these for hauling out quarters:

http://www.kelty.com/p-272-cache-hauler-frame-only.aspx?category=backpacks

I've been really impressed with the Eberlestock pack and don't think I could design a better daypack for what I use it for. It's a lot of bang for your buck in my opinion. I compared the Kelty pack with a cheaper off brand version today, at the local hunting supply store, and came away convinced that the $30 more for the Kelty was well worth the extra money. Kelty also makes a bag that attaches to the frame for those backpack hunts.

The Kelty Cache Hauler is a great pack frame.  I have one and like it, bought it early last summer but didn't fill any of my tags this season so I haven't use it hauling out quarters.  I did use it several times this summer carrying bulk stuff into camp sites far from the truck.  The drawback to this packframe is like the drawback to many other pack frames - the hardware (pins/rings) tends to raddle more than I'd like, meaning it's not totally silent if you were to wear it while actively hunting.  That's okay because I usually have always left my old frame at the truck, then gone back to get it after I've harvest an animal.

I did later buy the pack that goes along with my Cache Hauler but it really is too large of a pack for carrying what little I carry in the field while actually hunting.  Typically a daypack is all I need at max.  Plus installing and removing the Kelty pack from the frame is a real pain.  I really like that the packframe itself comes with it's own blaze orange rain cover.  Perfect for covering up quarters and gamebags on your frame.

COMeatHunter's picture
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Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 602
I completely agree, the packs

I completely agree, the packs for the external frames are usually about 4500-5000ci.  HUGE for a day pack.  And the creaking and rattling of the pins and rings is too loud to be used when actually hunting IMO.  What has worked well for me is to use the shoulder straps on my simple fleece rucksack to fasten it to the frame.  I've only done this twice in last 20 years or so, but it worked very well both times.  If my hunting daypack was larger or had an internal frame or waistbelt it wouldn't work nearly as well.  

I usually leave my pack frame in the truck and retrieve it only when needed for packing out meat too.  

 

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