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Location: KS
Joined: 12/21/2006
Posts: 18
Fail Safe Ammunition is Stellar

In my opinion, the Winchester Fail Safe ammunition is premium hunting ammunition that performs admirably. In my experience, I have obtained very reasonable groups with this ammunition. Winchester classifies this ammunition as CXP3, but the ammunition is extremely effective for killing light, thin-skinned game (CXP2) and large, heavy game (CXP3).

The Winchester 300 Win. Mag. 180 grain Fail Safe ammunition has excellent accuracy for hunting ammunition. I use this ammunition in a Browning semiautomatic 300 Win. Mag. Lightweight Stalker with a BOSS. (The BOSS is a combination of a muzzle break and adjustable weight that allows the rifle to be tuned to different factory loads.) I shoot ½-1” groups at 100 yards using a rifle rest.

The bullet is very lethal. I have shot numerous whitetail deer with this bullet and they were all recovered within 10 to 150 yards. I also use this bullet to field kill bison by shooting the bison in the head at 25-30 yards. Now that is a real test for any ammunition. With other bullets, multiple shots are required, but with the Fail Safe: one shot, one kill!

Let me provide one example of the accuracy and lethality of this ammunition. I shot a very large 9 point atypical whitetail buck on December 10, 2006. As I had read the blog before hunting, I made a point to study the kill in detail.

The animal traveled approximately 50 yards and dropped dead. The bullet entered the buck centered vertically just behind the shoulder, which is where I was aiming. The bullet traveled at an angle to the rear through both lungs and the liver. The exit wound in the hide was twice the size of the bullet. While processing the animal, I observed that the bullet had started expanding upon hitting the ribs and was fully expanded by the time it exited the body. The bullet left a large wound channel in both lungs and the liver. Now that is the type of performance that I like to see in a hunting bullet!

I am very disappointed that Winchester decided to discontinue making this ammunition and supplying the bullet. Fortunately, I have been able to purchase enough bullets and ammunition to last me several decades. Hopefully, Winchester will again make this superior CXP3 ammunition again one day.

Thank you for giving people the opportunity to express their opinion about this very fine ammunition. I am pleased to see that other hunters have also enjoyed success with this ammunition.

P.S. I have documented the pathology of the wounds using a digital camera. If anyone is interested in viewing the awesome power of this bullet, please contact me.

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Location: Kentucky/ Colorado
Joined: 06/23/2005
Posts: 1740
Not Happy with bullet

jungleman, Great first post. Thumbs up Nice buck!

Welcome to BGH. Big smile

Quote:
P.S. I have documented the pathology of the wounds using a digital camera. If anyone is interested in viewing the awesome power of this bullet, please contact me.

I'd be interested.

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Location: KS
Joined: 12/21/2006
Posts: 18
Fail Safe Wound Pathology

Hiker,

Thank you for the warm welcome. I appreciate your kind words and look forward to contributing to this forum regularly.

Upon examination, the bullet entered the deer on the left side just in front of the diaphragm and exited on the right side to the rear of the diaphragm. The entry wound was not visible and fur had to be removed to show it clearly. The entry wound measured about 8 mm (0.31 inches). The bullet then traveled through both lungs creating a large wound channel. Blood was observed in the abdominal cavity indicating the bullet traveled through the diaphragm. This is consistent with massive liver damage. The exit wound was about 18 mm in diameter. Interestingly, the fur around the exit wound was missing.

In summary, the deer died from massive hemorrhaging due to blood loss from the lungs and liver. The entry wound was about the same diameter as that of the bullet caliber. The exit wound indicated the bullet expanded to twice the original diameter. As this was a pass through shot, no bullet was recovered.

As a note, the exit wounds from lung shots with the 300 Win. Mag. 180 gr. Fail Safe bullet create excellent blood trails. I also shot two other deer this year with this bullet. Both deer were very easy to track in the dark with a flashlight because of blood loss through the exit wound. One deer died a few yards in the woods about 25 yards from where it was shot in my field. The other deer died about 25 yards in the woods about 100 yards from where it was shot in my field.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any additional questions.

Sincerely,

Jungleman

P.S. I will be killing a bison on Wednesday but shooting it in the head. My goal is to study the wound pathology and hopefully recover the Fail Safe bullet. I will share the report once I have had a chance to study the findings.

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redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
Not Happy with bullet

Jungleman - How Goes it? Welcome to the site Big smile Ever hear of a place called Lake Dabinawa? If not I live about 10 Miles from ya'. Glad to have another Kansan around Thumbs up
Great looking buck! Tell us more about that hunt. Did you hunt some in Unit 19?

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Location: KS
Joined: 12/21/2006
Posts: 18
The Hunt

Redrider,

I haven’t heard of Lake Dabinawa. I tried to locate it using several search engines on the internet. My best guess is that it is in southern Jefferson County. Am I close?

I have a 200 acre bison ranch on the West side of Clinton Lake. The ranch is near the Wakarusa River inlet to Clinton Lake on the South side of the river. I do all of my hunting at my ranch, which is in Unit 19.

The highlight of my deer hunting season was shooting a large buck. The last time I captured an image on my game camera of one of the two large bucks frequenting my ranch was in early September. It was now the last day of firearms season, December 10, and I decided to run an experiment with estrous doe urine to see if I could attract a large buck.

The experimental design was straight forward. I built a device to hold scent wicks from rebar and fence wire. The rebar was bent into a U-shape and inserted into the ground. The fence wire was fashioned into hooks. The scent wicks were therefore held three feet above the ground to help disburse the scent. In addition, I placed the device within 25 yards of the woods.

Sunday, December 10, was a perfect day for a test. The wind was from the south. This would blow the scent directly into the woods where I knew the deer were bedding down during the day.

Around 15:30 h, I saturated the wicks with one bottle of estrous doe urine and headed to my ground blind in a stand of cedar trees about 75 yards away. It was a beautiful day to watch the sun set.

Shortly after 17:00 h, I saw movement at the fence line. I could see a large buck looking and scenting before it decided to jump. My heart started racing as the buck leaped the fence in a single swift graceful movement.

I felt that I needed to act swiftly. The buck was crossing in front of me broadside making for a perfect shot at 90 yards. I aimed carefully at the moving deer and squeezed the trigger making sure I didn’t flinch.

The shot was perfect. The buck ran maybe 50 yards across the field and then into the woods. For some reason, it turned around immediately and dropped 50 yards in front of me. I waited 20 minutes for it to bleed out before walking cautiously to the deer.

I was thrilled with what I saw when I arrived. It was one of the large bucks. The animal was massive and the rack totally awesome!

Sincerely,

Jungleman

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Moderator
Location: Kentucky/ Colorado
Joined: 06/23/2005
Posts: 1740
Not Happy with bullet

jungleman, Great photos! I also hunt with a .300 Win Mag. I like shooting 180 Federal Premium Nosler Partitions.

redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
Not Happy with bullet

Jungleman - You are right on. Lake Dabinawa is 7 miles north of Midland Junction(hwy 24) on Wellman Rd. and about a mile east. I do some crappie fishing in the Spring over in your neck of the woods. 458 Rd West from 1023 to 1150 N. and down the dead end road and then hike back over south to the River. Always love going back there. I bet you got some Great Deer back in there, obvious from the deer you got this year! Good Story and Great Buck! I do most of my hunting around my hometown of Holton. Family does alot of farming up there and have access to couple thousand acres. I had a horrible year trying to find a Big buck. Didn't see a single one from stand ( about 75 - 100 hours on stand). Had lots of them show up on the trail cams, but just couldn't get it timed right this year Brick Wall,)
Are you getting your deer mounted?
Good to talk to you, Hopefully you stick around and join in. Really a good group of guys here Thumbs up

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Location: KS
Joined: 12/21/2006
Posts: 18
Fail Safe Bone Penetration Performace at Muzzle Velocity

Rerider, Hiker, et al,

I mentioned that I would be killing a bison on December 27, 2006 in my post to the forum on December 22, 2006 at 8:54 a.m. I also promised that I would post a report of the wound pathology.

First let me describe the kill. The herd usually gets excited when the veterinarian is driving my truck and I am in the back with my Browning 300 Win. Mag. Semiautomatic Lightweight Stalker with a BOSS. The herd responded by running a short distance and then forming a tight group. It took about 15 minutes for them to relax enough to stop running and rapidly moving about.

Next, I had to wait for a good shot at the bull I had selected to kill. We were parked next to the herd and the bull was in the middle of the herd. Fortunately, the animals tend to move around. The bull was in the middle of the herd but eventually migrated right up to the truck.

Finally, the opportunity came to shot the bull. The bull was facing me and was relatively isolated without any other bison in the line of fire. The window of opportunity was open and I needed to take the shot.

The bull was about 10 yards away as I lined up my cross-hairs in the middle of the head above the eyes and below the horns. I squeezed the trigger. The bull’s front legs immediately buckled causing his front half to collapse. The massive animal then fell over dead. The bull was not moving.

The Fail Safe bullet is an accurate and lethal bullet under these conditions. The animal was shot at almost point blank range. The bullet would therefore be traveling almost at 3000 fps with energy of 3597 ft-lbs. This is an extreme test of a bullet in my opinion. The bullet is traveling at near maximum velocity and energy while slamming into a wall of bone!

The wound pathology supports the hypothesis that this is one really tough bullet. The bullet entered just to the right of middle of the eyes and about 1 inch above the eyes. The bullet created an entry hole about 12 mm in diameter. The wound channel continued through the lower left hemisphere of the brain and out through the base of the skull. The wound path created a channel through which one could see once the brain and coagulated blood was removed. The bullet was not recovered. Upon examination, the animal died from massive brain hemorrhage created by bone fragments and the Fail Safe bullet.

The performance of the bullet is stellar at penetrating bone. This bullet may not have the best looking mushroom in ballistic gelatin, but is this medium the best performance indicator for bone? I have had excellent success penetrating bone in whitetail deer (CXP2 game) and bison (CXP3 game) with this bullet.

In summary, the Fail Safe bullet is a premium bullet that is dependable: one shot equals one kill! To date, I have had one shot kills on all the bison that I have shot over the past two years with the Fail Safe bullet. Other premium bullets that I have used don’t perform as well under the conditions reported here for bison and I certainly wouldn’t attempt this type of shot with standard jacked lead bullets.

Jungleman

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redrider's picture
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Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
Not Happy with bullet

Certainly sounds like it did it's job Thumbs up Was that one of your buff's from your farm?

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Location: KS
Joined: 12/21/2006
Posts: 18
Study Subject

You are correct. I shot a 2 and 1/2 year old bull. I like to kill them between 2 to 3 years of age to keep the meat tender.

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