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Joined: 12/12/2011
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Noobie needs some help with bows! Come on outta the woodwork experts!

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Critter's picture
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Location: Western Colorado
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So then you are looking for a

So then you are looking for a recurved or a longbow instead of a compound (one that has silly wheel-and-pulleys).

I would suggest for you to head down to a bow shop in your area or even if you have to drive a ways to check them out. You can pick up a recurve for anywhere from $50.00+ to what ever you want to spend along with different weights of pull. Depending on how fit you are and what your arm strength is I would recommend nothing over 50 lbs for you to start with, but if you hit a archery shop you can check them out and find one that fits your needs. Also you don't want to leave a recurve bow strung up when you are storeing it, they just are not designed to stay strung that long.

2 hours practice a day is a lot of shooting with a recurve. I don't even know anyone that shoots a compound that much every day but that would defiantly get your arm strength up.

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Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4423
If you have never shot one

If you have never shot one not to mention haven't owned one you really need to get to a shop that specializes in archery equipment. Even if you have to drive a couple of hours to get to one. Once there they can explain the different aspects of each bow and get you one that fits. Not to mention the right arrows and points for what you intend to use it for. They'll need to check your draw length to do this along with checking the poundage that you can draw. There is no sense in getting a 60 lb bow if you can only pull 45 lbs.

As for brand names to watch for there is Bear, Hoyt, and Ben Pearson to only name a few.

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Joined: 12/12/2011
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Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4423
I personally don't own a

I personally don't own a knife with a blade ove 5" and have never felt hindered with them in the outdoors. They are easier to use in most cases unless you are planning on cutting down a tree with it.

One of my personal favorites for a fixed blade knife is the Buck Woodsman with a 4" blade. Other than that I'll pack a Gerber Gator folding lockback most of the time. I also always have a 2 1/2" folding pocket knife that I have with me at all times along with a Letherman Wave that has 2 3" blades.

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Preacherdan's picture
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Joined: 04/16/2013
Posts: 26
Stick bows

If your wanting to ahoot a stick bow, unless you are completely stacked, 2 solid hours of arrow after arrow is going to make your arm want to fall off, i shoot long bow, it is always best to un string your bow, it only takes a matter of seconds to string it.  If yo. Truly want to get a bow you like shoot that particular bow before you take it home , every stick bow shoots different from the rest, make sure you wear your arm guard , your forearn will thank you if your stance ia not right or you have a sloppy shooting bow , theY Do make fiberglass rigs, as far as knives go, te kabar would be good for cutting deer or rope or not so intricate things, but fixed blade knives for cleaning fiah you want a slim flexible sharp knife , the kabar is a nice knife but not for detailed work 

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