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Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

January 2010 Product Review

Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

Nikon has been in the optics market for a long time, and is best known for their camera and non-hunting optics business. However over the last decade, Nikon has been progressively making a push into the hunting and sporting optics market. Today, Nikon manufactures a variety of binoculars, spotting scopes, rangefinders, and rifle scopes specifically for the hunting market. Chances are good that you or a hunter you know has tried out one of Nikon's products. For this review we are going to take a look at the Monarch series of rifle scopes. Read more...

Please use this area to post comments or questions about this review.

Location: Utah
Joined: 02/24/2003
Posts: 596
Re: Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

I have to admit the one thing I've never understood is mans fear of a high powered scope on a rifle. I have a Nikon Monarch that goes up to 20 power and if I could have more I would. For me learning to be steady and aquire your target at higher power requires nothing more than practice and a good rest. Sure if I have to take a shorter shot or a standing shot then I turn it down but isn't that why thy are adjustable?

The article says that the 32 power is too much. I say bring it on!! I want to try one. A high powered scope adjusted properly combined with a shooter that spends time learning how to use it will be more accurate at longer ranges than if that same shooter is using the the old 9 or 10 power standby. Seeing your rifle shake in your scope is a good thing folks!!! It tells you how bad you are really shaking. Practice, practice, practice!! Thumbs up

Don't just practice pulling the trigger either. Practice good breathing and getting a good rest. I practice all the time in the field on animals I'm passing up in situations that are less than ideal such as using a tree as a rest rather than my shooting sticks. I check to see how steady my rest is and put the cross hairs where they belong, I just don't pull the trigger. Also don't under estimate the art of finding your target quickly in your scope while on high power. Aim your gun at the target with both eyes open, close one eye, and look through your scope. You should be be able to see your intended target, if not you're close. It takes practice but for me is now second nature with both my rifle scope and my spotting scope. When someone uses my rifle I always hear the same thing, "I can't find the target. Your scope power is too high." Did I mention it takes a little practice?

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Re: Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

I agree with ratherbehunting......it only takes some practice and patience to get competent with the long rang BDC style of scope. I had to laugh when I read that when friends look through the scope....that they can't see the target!!!.....then I pick up the gun and shoot 1-2 inch groups at our standard 200-300 yard targets.

sure, it takes time to make sure that you maintain a constant eye relief and imperative that you move the barrel and your head in unison perfectly.....not like using a 3x9.....but I enjoy the hour or so at the range a couple times a month....and the torn paper proves that it works. I just purchased a new Monarch.....6x24 with parallax.....and am very happy with it. I put it on a 22-250 for some coyote and wild pig hunting .......can't wait for next weekend when we go out for the first time. I'm also looking forward to hitting the range later today when the snow stops.....

Steady.....squeeze.........serve it up!

Teddy

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Re: Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

I think if you really want to carry that much scope, then by all means carry it. The two best hunting scopes I ever owned were a 2 3/4X and a 4X, I still have and use the 2 3/4X. I am not a long range shooter at game so what I need is a scope that lets me see better withing 300yds, I call that reasonable. I want a scope that rides low on the rifle, just seem's to me the rifle handles better that way. And I certainly don't want a scope to look like it is wearing the rifle. It's always been my impression the low power fixed power scopes gather light better for early. late and timber shooting. And point of impact will never change with a fixed power scope while with some variables it just may.

A lot of people really seem to like those high power scopes. Especially the ones with turrets and paralex adjustments. That's fine by me, I just don't get it. I really wouldn't care to carry all that around. Usually you'll find those scopes on a rifle with a bipod attached too, just more weight to carry around. Why does someone go out of their way to get a 6# rifle then put a heavy scope and a bipod on it?

Location: Utah
Joined: 02/24/2003
Posts: 596
Re: Nikon Monarch Rifle Scope Review

Don,

I can certainly understand if you have your rathers and enjoy using the lower power scopes....there is nothing wrong with that. But think of it this way......some people don't mind the Honda Accord with 186 hp while others enjoy driving the 'Vette with 500 hp. Is just about extreme performance, taking your abilities to your own personal edge. For some that's not enticing and staying with the tried and true method that works with little to no desire to venture outside that box is their thing and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. But for some others, me included, getting better, improving my range, being more accurate is a challenge that drives me. It's just fun and gives you a real sense of accomplishment to take a rifle, add some bedding, put on some optics, maybe a little trigger work, then working up a good load and seeing your hard work pay off. It's satisfying even if you do nothing but punch holes in paper. Same with calling elk for me. It's a passion of mine that I am constantly working at and finding ways to sound more realistic while improving the way I do it overall. Turkey hunting has become a new passion that I sepnd many many hours working at. Working on great shotgun patterns and good calling occupies much of my free time.

To be honest, for me it's not even about being able to take game at longer ranges. Going back to the elk calling thing I have called in hundreds of elk but I have actually only killed 5 of those elk. The rest were either shot with my camera or called in just for fun. It's just something I genuinely enjoy doing. Being able to fill a milk jug with water and watch it explode at 700 yds one second after I shoot makes me flat out giddy. Or taking a coyote at that range makes me jump up and down like a boy in a school yard. It's a challenge and I love a good challenge. Shooting is just something I'm passionate about becuase I enjoy it so much. I spend many, many more hours shooting at targets than I've ever thought about shooting at animals.

On a side note the longest shot I have taken at big game was at 400yds. I did take that animal with one shot. I had another at 350yds and all the rest have been under 300 yds. It's not that I'm afraid to take a longer shot, it's just that I like the challenge of getting closer. In fact most of my big game hunting is done with archery and muzzleloader now days. (No scope on the muzzy) But I still take out my favorite rifle from time to time and chase some elk with it and it comes out several times a year to chase yotes and blow up milk jugs at long ranges.

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