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new wood stock?

To completly prep a new rifle I know you have to clean all the metal parts. But any suggestions on how to go about sealing the walnut stock? How do I take off the recoil pad to seal that area? Is it necessary or recommended to completly dissassemble the rifle to seal the entire stock? It's a free floating barrel so how do you seal the wood around that? I've heard about waxing the stock. I guess my question would be how do I go about sealing those hidden areas of the stock?

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Take the metal part's from

Take the metal part's from it. Top and bottom of the reciol pad willm probably be a hole you can't see buy find pretty easy with a philips screwdriver. If you don't find them or don't care to look, just mask off the pad with tape. Keep in mind there isd probably bare wood under it. If you want to completely refinish the stock, take the old finish off with finish remover, Remington finish is hard to remove but I did find a remover that remover's it. Don't worry about removing finish inside the stock. Get the stock as clean as you can, bare wood. Don't sand. Feather. Hold the stock over a whistleing tea pot. It'll raaise the tiny sliver's of wood. Feather then rub with 0000 steel wool. Run your hands over the stock and feel for rough areas. If you find them, feather and rub again. Do it till you can't feel anything other than smooth wood. Take masking tape and tape ofrf the checkering. BTW, best way to get the finish and remover out of the checkering is to rub it out with a hard tooth brush. Put the finish on anyway you want. If there's pore's in the wood, you can get them filled by putting on finish, I like Tru Oil, with 400 grit wet/dry sand paper. Dip the paper into oil and rub it in circles on the wood. The paper will cut wood very little and the dust mixed with oil make a great wood filler; It'll take a number of coats but the end result is worth it. To do inside the stock, just wipe on oild to seal, pretty doesn't count in there. When your all done, you still need to do thje checkering. Pull off the tape and put a coat of finish oil in it with a soft tooth brush.

Ratyher than rubbing oil, you can spraay it. Used a good outdoor sprat finish. Spray on a few coats and let it dry good. Then get out the 0000 steel wool and dip in in a little finish oil and rub the stock out and wipr off the oil that is still left. When it drys well, you can do it again. I'd want five or six coats of spray finish done that way. If you spray, leave the tape on the checkering until the last coat and spray lightly.

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GEEEEZ  Don.  Would it just

GEEEEZ  Don.  Would it just be easier to move to Antelope, Oregon and have you show me? 

Ok. Thank you for your time.  Just a couple things.

I just held a friends new Browning Citori shotgun today.  He said he paid a grand for it, and it retails at just over 2 grand.  But to be honest, it felt cheap.  Almost plastic like.  It has walnut stock and looks nice.  But when I picked it up I was a little surprised.  I actually asked him if it was real wood or not.  Will my Model 70 feel like that?  I hope not! 

I will do what you prescribed above.  Especially if it is going to take away that plastic feel like my friends shotgun has. 

" If you want to completely refinish the stock, take the old finish off with finish remover": 

I do.  Will any old t'shirt will work to wipe it off with?

"Don't sand. Feather"

What do you mean by "Feathering"?

Is it ok not to tape off checkering and just do that the same time as everything else?  You said I could use a hard toothbrush to remove the finish.  But before that you said to tape off the checkering.   "Take masking tape and tape ofrf the checkering. BTW, best way to get the finish and remover out of the checkering is to rub it out with a hard tooth brush."

So it's ok to remove all the finish on the entire stock at the same time?  No need to tape of checkering right?  Since I'm just going to remove it anyway out of the checkering.

"It'll take a number of coats ."

Coats of what? The Tru Oil?

THANK YOU DON.

 

; after I'm done doing all of this will the rifle be all shiny? Cause that's not really what I'm looking for. I don't want the plastic look and feel to the stock.

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tung oil

I've been doing some more reading. I think that tung oil is the direction I want to go. Old Masters 100% pure tung oil.

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scratch the pure tung oil.

scratch the pure tung oil. Don you mentioned Tru Oil. I read at woodmagazine.com in a discussion that its a polymerized linseed oil. I guess it makes it more durable and more moisture resistant than just tung oil.

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Feathering is a process where

Feathering is a process where steam is applied to the stock and it lifts small hairs of wood that even ther finest sand paper leaves. Once you've done it and before you rub it out with steel wood, run your hand over the stock. You'll feel what your gonna remove. Rubbing with the steel wool pulls out these little sliver's of wood.

Unless you've got a really great piece of wood, if you look you'll see pores in the stock. They get real evident with a dried coat of finish on it. The finish reis and is sucked into these pores leaving a very small pockek at each poor. In the past, I have used wood filler to fill them but have since found rubbing the oil in with wet/dry paper to do a better job. As you workm the paper in small circles it not only spreads the oil but sand the stock very lightly. That sanding dust mix's with the oil and is forced into the pores. You apply in a circular motion to get it into them. Even with wood filler, thined way down, the poors will not fill well unless yoiu wipe the filler off going cross grain. Go with the grain and most the filler get's pulled out removing the excess. Don't put on to heavy of coats, pile a bunch of thin coats.

Everything is really pretty simple just takes a bit to explain it. If you've got an old 22, you might do it first to practice.

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If you are talking about a

If you are talking about a new off the shelf rifle I wounldn't do a thing to the stock, it is good to go from the factory. Now after you have had it a while and understand what Don is talking about then go ahead and refinish the stock.

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