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Joined: 01/21/2010
Posts: 54
Re: need help

I have access to national forest and one or two privite lands with alot of turkey sign.I just need help on calling.

ecubackpacker's picture
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Location: NC
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Re: need help

What part of Va?

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Joined: 01/21/2010
Posts: 54
Re: need help

I live in Shenadeoah valley.

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Joined: 01/21/2010
Posts: 54
Re: need help

Anybody there. Help!

Alpine_Archer's picture
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Location: Martin County NC
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Re: need help

Your best bet would be to get a slate or box call. They are alot easier to use. I use a diaghram call myself and its hard to explain to someone what to do with there mouth. just practice day and night and drive your parents mad if you can't afford another call.

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Location: Midwest
Joined: 03/21/2009
Posts: 41
Re: need help

hunterboy: If you are still looking for some help with your turkey calling, I could try to give you a few tips. Let me know what aspect of your calling you are looking for help with. What I mean is - are you looking to find tips on when to call? How much to call? Types of calls? Or what ever else you are looking for. Lots of books and articles have been written on calling - so we will need to avoid writing another book here - but I will help you with what I can.

I check back on these forums every few days, so be patient and I will respond eventually.

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Joined: 01/21/2010
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Re: need help

Well i did drive my sister mad Big smile any way i was wondering when to call and what type would be best.

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Location: Midwest
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Posts: 41
Re: need help

Hunterboy: I know this will be long but here goes…..

I will try to give you a few tips and I also encourage you to read up, listen to audio and watch videos on turkey hunting. The books and audio are probably best. Most successful hunters spend as much time on the mental aspects of the hunt as the physical aspects. I will base my comments on spring hunts.

Before you start calling there are a few things that you must be aware of each day that you are out calling or hunting. 1. Things are different each day and you must adapt to those changes. 2. Turkeys are extremely wary birds and they are constantly watching for danger. 3. Turkeys live in that woods all year and they are living with other turkeys. They see and hear those other turkeys every day. They know what their friends sound like. 4. As the weather warms up in the spring the turkeys go from just hanging around together – to looking for mates and mating – and then to most hens ignoring the toms as they nest. Their actions and responses change with this. 5. Sometimes you are calling the toms and sometimes you call the hens – so the toms will follow them. 6. You can get turkeys in two ways. You can call them in to where you want them, or you can be where they are going before they get there.

Keeping all that in mind we can get to the calling. I think that the absolute best thing that you can do to become a good caller and turkey hunter is to go out into the woods when there is no hunting season and listen and watch the turkeys. (I would not set out a decoy for this). Then try your calling and your different calls. Try to sound like the birds do. You will discover that each one sounds a bit different. If you are not real good at it yet - call with short calls that are not too loud. As you get better you can try to call longer and louder and try to compete with the real hens. Try all of the different types of calls and certainly your three different mouth calls. I always take a box call, slate call and several different mouth calls every day – and I use them all. I want to sound like several different birds – maybe a whole flock.

One of the keys to calling is to understand what the turkeys are interested in doing at that particular moment. Since that is impossible, you need to make the best guess that you can based upon what is happening in the woods.

For calling at sunup when they are in trees:

If you are in the woods and the toms are not gobbling and the hens are quiet too, then you do not want to call much at all. You want to do what they are doing. You may want to do a few soft calls just to let them know you are there, but that may be all. If you decide to call, make it short and about every 30 minutes at most. Sometimes no calling is best.

If the toms are gobbling and the hens are vocal too, then you want to call. Again, you want to do what they are doing. You may want to do a few soft calls just to let them know you are there, and then increasing your calling to compete with the hens. Your success will usually be based upon what they are doing that day, and you have no control over that. It is difficult to convince a tom that you are a better hen than the ones in the tree next to him. In this case maybe try to convince the hens that you want them to come over to you by sounding alone or lost with softer calls that a hen may respond to and come looking for you – and the tom will come with her.

If the toms are gobbling and you do not hear any hens, then you want to call. You may want to do a few soft calls just to let them know you are there, and then increase your calling and the excitement in your calls to get the toms interest. With experience in the woods you can tell if the tom if facing you or facing away and if he stays facing you and gobbling his head off, you might just try to sound like a small flock of birds that are all excited. Then reduce your calling once he seems interested only in you and then a fly down call, followed up with less and softer calls that indicate you are on the ground looking for a friend.

If you use several different calls to sound like several different birds, and the birds are on the ground and coming, you should keep using the variety of calls because you want them to still hear the different calls calling to them - but reduce your calling. If they are close and are coming toward you – there may be no need to call. They are doing what you want – so let them do it.

Gobblers will also gobble during the day as well as walk around feeding, walking around with a flock or looking for friends if they are alone. Then some calling every 30-45 minutes or so may work, but you need to be set up in a place where they are going to feed, water or a daytime resting spot.

Sorry this got so long. Ask other questions if you have some.

Good luck with your adventures.

ecubackpacker's picture
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Location: NC
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Re: need help

Good posts here. One thing to remember is to not try calling to a turkey before you can be hunting that bird. You don't want to educate the bird in any way. It's fine to listen to the birds and scout their movements but wait to you get home to practice calling. Sometines you can do simply things to lure a bird. Try imitating a bird flying down at sunrise with a hat or fake turkey fan. That along with a few clucks can be very effective when the birds are silent or hunted hard. Just scracthing in the leaves can help provide realism to your calling. Another sound that lets that turkey know there's another "turkey" over there. Call sparingly, call lightly and imitate the hens if they're real vocal. You can definitely bump the birds if you're too loud or too frequent in your calling. Sometimes all it takes is a couple of clucks. Always be patient and don't feel you will have to get a bird the first couple of times you go hunting. I was in the same situation you're in, I learned how to hunt turkeys on my own. But you can do it. The hardest part for me was/still is learning to read the situation at hand. Calling IMHO is not as important as knowing the terrain and the habits of the birds b/c I have heard some sick sounding turkeys. All in all it will take time to learn how to turkey hunt. That's part of the fun of turkey hunting. The challenge. Good hunting Thumbs up

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Joined: 01/21/2010
Posts: 54
Re: need help

Thanks alot which call would be best the ez rasp double D or the raspy old hen.