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Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 05/06/2009
Posts: 17
My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

Well, I finally got my rifle, scoped it, and targeted it in. I LOVE IT!!!!!
My Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300 WSM is the perfect rifle for hunting. It is LIGHT!!! It is ACCURATE (3 shots - two holes) at 100 yards with factory ammo - Federal 180 grn. It is not as punishing as I was told it would be. As a matter of fact, it is comfortable to shoot. I do recommend something like the "Lead Caddy" for target shooting simply because you will not develope the "flinch" as easily and taking the "hunting" shot is not the same as taking the "target" or practice shot. The second type is much more punishing when shooting up a box of ammo. I can't wait for my 25-06, 7mm 08, 223, 308.........

I tried the DNZ product, "Game Reaper" low mount with my Bushnell 3200 Elite 3x9x40 scope and could not get the scope to sit where I wanted it. However, I can tell you that the folks at DNZ are wonderful and the mounts look great on top of the Tikka. The factory supplied rings are in the trash. I am using WARNE Maxima rings and the folks there are as good as they come. I found that Millett makes the clamp type rings and QD as does WARNE. However, I believe that WARNE Maxima are the better. You can pay more for the tactical rings but I do not feel they are needed. I also REALLY like the Torque wrench WARNE sells. It is worth the money $25.00. The best suppliers for rings and bases for the Tikka are SAKO (not Tikka supplied rings), Leupold, DNZ, Warne, Talley. and Millett. I prefer to not have the base or base part of the rings as in DNZ (one piece), Talley (one piece), Leupold, and SAKO (both two piece - base and rings) with the screws that attach the mounts to the rifle hidden by the scope. I want to check the screws from time to time and I have to remove the scope to do that. At $70+ a box of hunting ammo, resighting in the rifle is toooooooooooooo expensive. With the WARNE Maxima rings (not QD) I have access to all the screws and with the WARNE torque wrench, checking the tightness is a breeze - without stripping the screws or tool.

I really like the smaller/shorter scopes for big game hunting. The overall sex appeal or look of the rifle is better when the entire package is tight and light. It is easier to craddle in my arms when walking on tricky ground. And for large game, I really don't need to see the animal's eye color to know if I want to take the shot. I LOVE my Bushnell 3200 Elite 3x9x40. It is as bright as my friends Swarovsky, as clear as any scope I have used, and has all of the power I care for with game the size of yotes to elk.
My choice of caliber is the 300wsm. It is a 30/06 with a meaner bite. However, Tikka makes enough versions with enough calibers to suit any shooter. The trigger is as good as it gets, the rifle is tough but light weight. And, if the stock does ever go out, the action and barrel deserve a finer fiberglass stock. However, I have been in touch with enough Tikka shooters to feel secure in the life of the stock.

AND, the "plastic" mag is plenty strong and tough enough for the everyday shooter/hunter like me.

I really can not say enough about my TIKKA T3 LITE STAINLESS rifle. Get one or more if you can.

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Location: Kentucky/ Colorado
Joined: 06/23/2005
Posts: 1737
My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

Sweet! I have a few friends that have that rifle and they all love it. Good choice.

HOGGETTER's picture
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Location: CenCal
Joined: 11/05/2009
Posts: 750
My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

Welcome to the T3 Tikka Army

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Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 05/06/2009
Posts: 17
My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

Ya baby!!! The Tikka T3 is a great rifle. I have had nothing but wood and blued steel up until now. Most of my rifles are from my Grandfather (pre64 winchester super grade in 300H&H, Reminton 721 in 30/06 that Arnold Arms made into a tack driving 25-06).I have purchased Ruger, Browing, Remington, and Winchester hunting rifles over the years. All were right handed and I finally broke down and purchased a rifle for me - in left hand. Initially, I was not sure of the synthetic stock and the stainless steel, no iron sights, and the lack of "poundage" in the rifle. After I handled the rifle in the field, I was more than happy. I did not purchase the rifle for long shootings anyway. I wanted and got a very dependable hunting rifle that will out perform most, if not all, of the competing hunting rifles out there for the same or near same price.

The Tikka army rocks!!!!

Any Tikka shooters out there that have statements (good and bad) PLEASE post here so I can learn more about my rifle.

bitmasher's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
Re: My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm
Oldnavy wrote:
The overall sex appeal or look of the rifle is better when the entire package is tight and light.

Think Metal and plastic really don't do it for me, buddy. But whatever turns your crank.

Anyway, Tikka's are by and large good rifles. One thing that annoys me, like sako, is that beretta does not include a factory shot target that details what ammo (bullet weight, manufacture, etc) was used to test the rifle before shipping it out. Its true that few manufactures do this, but tikka and sako talk a lot more about five shot groups and such in their literature and marketing.

I like the magazines on the sako a7 over the factory all plastic tikka mag.

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Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 05/06/2009
Posts: 17
Re: My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

On a calmer note, my other rifles have each had thier own unique characteristics. For instance, my Ruger International in 30/06 loves a clean, cold barrel. It shoots dead on every time first shot and then the group gets larger with each shot afterward. However, it is a very dependable brush rifle. The short, sporter barrel with iron sights, the half stock in lamanant with black fore end tip, and the Warne QD rings makes an awsome package. I shot a mule deer with the HE 180 grn Federal round and it ran about 50 yards and died. The young buck ran out of a thicket about 50 yards out in front of me and headed through an Aspen grove straight ahead of me. It stopped approx. 125 yards and turned to look at me. I lowered the crosshairs to midchest and hammered the buck.
The Winchester pre64s are all great looking guns. However, none like a clean barrel. All required a fouling shot(s) before I can trust where the bullet will hit. I have never shot a Winchester (in wood stock) that didn't kick harder than I liked no matter 300H&H or 30-06. I owned a modern 70 in 30-06 that had a muzzel rise of at least 18 inches besides a mean recoil. I got rid of it. My Remington 721 in 30-06 was customized by Arnold Arms and is now a tack driving 25-06. It is my favorite rifle for deer and smaller game. However, it also requires a fouling shot before taking it hunting. All of the above rifles are in right hand. Hence, my search for a left hand that likes a clean, cold barrel, maintains its accuracy, has managable recoil, is light weight, and can stand the punishing weather/temperature conditions I find myself hunting in (most of the time).

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Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 05/06/2009
Posts: 17
Re: My new Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 300wsm

I received my Warne rings in the "High' configuration and the Warne torque wrench. My Bushnell 3200 Elite 3x9x40 scope is backed up to be closer to where I need it to be in eye relief due to heavy weight clothing I wear hunting here in Colorado. the bell sits just above the chamber of the barrel. And with the pop up scope cover, the scope clears the barrel approx. 3/16 of an inch. I put Locktite (blue) in the rear rings between the scope and the rings and I applied Locktite to all the screws in both rings. The front rings have the recoil lug that fits into the hole in the Tikka receiver and i did not care to have to deal with keeping the lug in place while applying the Locktite. So, I attached the front rings (without too much trouble) to the scope and fitted the rings to the front of the reciever. I made sure that the lug is snug up against the front of the hole in the receiver. The recoil causes the scope/rings to want to move forward on the rifle when fired. Once the front rings were tightened with the torch wrench, I then applied the Locktite to the inside of the rear rings and placed them where they were needed to be on the reciever just behind the ejection port. I then tightened the rings to the receiver and scope. Always tighten the bottom screws first on Warne rings. I then loosened each screw (one at a time) and applied Locktite to each individual screw and retightened. I called Warne and had a wonderful conversation with their tech support before I mounted the rings. These guys really care. The torque wrench will not allow me to apply too much torque and strip the screw or the tool. From my initial mounting to the final tightening, each screw and the tool looks like new.

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