55 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 10/25/2011
Posts: 63
Sweet, so you give the Vais a

Sweet, so you give the Vais a thumbs up then? I have that break in my final few after reading reviews. Funny thing about my username- I think I've shot one wood duck my whole life. I made the username on a different forum when I was a freshman in highschool and it was my favorite duck. I have just stuck with it from forum to forum.

BleuBijou's picture
Offline
Location: Loveland , Colorado
Joined: 03/22/2010
Posts: 455
Vais

So maybe I missed it , but what did it end up costing you for the brake and install? I want to do a .308 for my 12 year old. I researched Still Hunters link and they seem to out perform others.

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 07/13/2011
Posts: 880
In my case it cost me $200

In my case it cost me $200 total.

Texaradoan's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2014
Posts: 48
207 out the door...best two

207 out the door...best two hundred I ever spent on this rifle. I could go back to the skeletal stock with the brake on, but the laminate looks too nice. The factory stock was brutal to shoot off the bench. Of course packing it through the mountains may be the deciding factor as the factory stock weighs next to nothing.

buffybr's picture
Offline
Location: Montana, USA
Joined: 11/15/2007
Posts: 315
muzzle brakes

I had KDF muzzle brakes installed on my .375 RUM and my .300 Weatherby. The cost was $200 each by a local gunsmith. I also installed mechanical recoil reducers in each of their stocks.

I had the brake installed on the .375 RUM after the first time I took it to the range and could only shoot 6 shots through it. I had the brake installed on the .300 Wby before I ever shot it.

I shoot skeet every Wednesday evening, and in preparation for a New Zealand hunt that I just made, I would first shoot 10-15 shells through my .300 Wby. I did this for about 6 months prior to my hunt. These were all shot from field positions, standing, sitting, and prone with the prone targets at 300 and 430 yds. With the brake, the .300 Wby kicks less than my .270 Win.

A little dust would sometimes be kicked up on the first prone shots, but nothing too bad.

On one African hunt that I used the .375 RUM, I shot 3 animals from prone positions and didn't have any problems with either dust from the muzzle blast or recoil. On my New Zealand hunt, I shot 2 animals from prone positions with my .300 Wby, and again there were no problems with dust or recoil.

I always wear ear protection at the range, regardless of the cartridge, and almost always when hunting.

I have never had any problems cleaning either rifle with their brakes.

Texaradoan's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2014
Posts: 48
$ weatherby $

A fella could go broke shooting a box of 300 wby every week....about the only reasonably priced shells I've found are the barnes vor-tx 180s at 60 a box but they're hard to come by. I'm a believer of practice with what your gonna hunt with but at 80 dollars a box plus, its hard to launch those factory weatherby accubonds down range at 4 dollars a pop. Hell the berger vlds aren't but 50 a box for the 7mm which I can stomach. but I guess its always been that way with weatherby. Pay to play! 

buffybr wrote:
I had KDF muzzle brakes installed on my .375 RUM and my .300 Weatherby. The cost was $200 each by a local gunsmith. I also installed mechanical recoil reducers in each of their stocks. I had the brake installed on the .375 RUM after the first time I took it to the range and could only shoot 6 shots through it. I had the brake installed on the .300 Wby before I ever shot it. I shoot skeet every Wednesday evening, and in preparation for a New Zealand hunt that I just made, I would first shoot 10-15 shells through my .300 Wby. I did this for about 6 months prior to my hunt. These were all shot from field positions, standing, sitting, and prone with the prone targets at 300 and 430 yds. With the brake, the .300 Wby kicks less than my .270 Win. A little dust would sometimes be kicked up on the first prone shots, but nothing too bad. On one African hunt that I used the .375 RUM, I shot 3 animals from prone positions and didn't have any problems with either dust from the muzzle blast or recoil. On my New Zealand hunt, I shot 2 animals from prone positions with my .300 Wby, and again there were no problems with dust or recoil. I always wear ear protection at the range, regardless of the cartridge, and almost always when hunting. I have never had any problems cleaning either rifle with their brakes.

Critter's picture
Online
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 3955
If I didn't reload there is

If I didn't reload there is no way that I could afford to shoot my .340 Weatherby as much as I do.  Factory loaded ammo with the Barnes X bullets run anywhere from $93.00-$106.00 for a box of 20.  I can reload them for around $1.00 a round once i have the cases. 

BleuBijou's picture
Offline
Location: Loveland , Colorado
Joined: 03/22/2010
Posts: 455
Reload

Critter wrote:

If I didn't reload there is no way that I could afford to shoot my .340 Weatherby as much as I do.  Factory loaded ammo with the Barnes X bullets run anywhere from $93.00-$106.00 for a box of 20.  I can reload them for around $1.00 a round once i have the cases. 

 

 

I second that on the reloading!! Only way to go!!

 

buffybr's picture
Offline
Location: Montana, USA
Joined: 11/15/2007
Posts: 315
Shooting cost

BleuBijou wrote:

Critter wrote:

If I didn't reload there is no way that I could afford to shoot my .340 Weatherby as much as I do.  Factory loaded ammo with the Barnes X bullets run anywhere from $93.00-$106.00 for a box of 20.  I can reload them for around $1.00 a round once i have the cases. 

 

 

I second that on the reloading!! Only way to go!!

 

Most of my guns have never fired a factory shell.  Like Critter posted, even the full power practice loads with Hornady bullets for my .300 Weatherby cost less than $1 each to reload.  With todays inflated bullet and component costs, the hunting loads for my .300 Wby with Barnes TTSX bullets cost me about $1.10 each.

I have also been casting lead bullets for almost as long as I have been shooting.  Almost all of my pistol bullets are cast lead.  I cast bullets and have practice loads for most of my rifles from .257AI up to .375 RUM.  These are great for up to 100 yd practice sessions, and they are easy on barrels and my wallet.

Most of my shotshells have also been my reloads.  About 30 years ago when I was seriously competing in Trap, I bought a shotmaker and began making my own shot.  For many years I was making and shooting about 700 lbs of my homemade shot each year.  The cost of my reloaded shotshells (.410, 28 ga, 20 ga, or 12 ga) is still only about $0.10 per shell.

Critter's picture
Online
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 3955
Here is a site it you want to

Here is a site it you want to know what your reloads are costing you.  Just input the information and click and it will give it to you.

http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
Muzzle Brake?younghunter121507/31/2006 15:53 pm
Muzzle Brakemymur206/24/2005 09:48 am
Muzzle Brakecodfish2101/11/2009 12:42 pm
Muzzle Brakes on Hunting Rifles, To Much Noise, Bull SH*T1912/26/2003 09:55 am
Covering a muzzle brake?Turdmucklydunn705/14/2010 17:48 pm