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JamesJM's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2012
Posts: 45
Hey numbnutz...

unique handle you have there.  Big smile

I'd be lost in Oregon.  My son and his family lived there until a couple of years ago, in Florence.  I used to go out and try to spot deer, and Elk.  I've never hunting in forest that dense... trees and brush... I wouldn't know how... I guess you have to find a well used trail and sit and wait? 

I was ticked when he moved to Japan, now England... I was really looking forward to hunting Oregon.  - JamesJM

numbnutz's picture
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Location: portland,oregon
Joined: 09/06/2007
Posts: 3058
numbnutz

My dad used to call me that back when I was a teen and in my early 20's. So did most of my friends. Hunting in Oregon can be challenging for sure. I have a few areas that I hunt and have scouted over the years. Most of my Elk hunting is done in eastern Oregon where its more open and not so steep. The doe I shot this year was just 2 miles down an old closed off logging road. If your ever interested in hunting up here let me know. I've been trying to get CA_Vermonster up here for a hunt.

JamesJM's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2012
Posts: 45
Just posted about that…

Sometime late last year the pigs began disappearing.  Until then we were overpopulated with them.  Seriously, the damage they were doing was incredible.  Pigs everywhere.

This year?  I haven't seen ONE, nor any sign of them.  I'm not sure where they moved.  I heard it's the same over by Holister, Ca.... no pigs, or darn few.  The last 20 years if you wanted a pig you drove to the ranch, opened the gate, shot a pig, and came home.  

We have an abundance of Quail....... better than any year in the last 20.  We have just begun to see Chukars as well, who normally never come over the high ridge to the north.  We've tried to get wild turkeys started but no luck so far.  I might see one or two every two years.

JamesJM's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2012
Posts: 45
A closer Photo

I zoomed this in with iPhoto so the quality isn't that great but you can see the antlers better in this photo.  This was the biggest of the two but they were almost identical.

 

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Ca_Vermonster's picture
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Location: San Diego, CA
Joined: 07/27/2007
Posts: 5774
Very cool, maybe twins?? I

Very cool, maybe twins??

I did not get out for quail this year, but i heard the same thing down here, that it's a really good year for them.

I will be heading up to Tejon in 3 weeks for my first pig hunt.  Getting excited, and I hope those ones don't disappear like yours did.... lol

buck_tracker's picture
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Joined: 03/20/2012
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Taste comes from diet IMO

As far as my experience goes, taste comes from the diet of the animal. I grew up hunting whitetail in Wisconsin where the deer have open access to the corn and grains we feed the cows. Very good taste, very little or no gamieness. I've fed it to out of state relatives who hate game meat and they love it. On the other hand, I have gotten a few swamp bucks in upper Michigan where they eat moss and other random stuff, and the meat is very gamie. Best thing I could do with it was grind it into hamburger mixed with beef and taloe. Not unedible, but definitely not corn fed. I've also had pronghorn that lived off of sage, and it too is gamie. Like I said, it seems that with the animals I have harvested the diet plays a huge role in flavor.

D7Resident's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2012
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Mulie vs. Blacktail meat

I am brand new to this site. But have had what I call mountain deer, compared to brush deer. As I read in another post. The flavor of the meat is directly proportionate to it's diet. With this in mind the location of the deer's home range determines what it's diet will consist of. High country deer, that are found near creeks or watery areas have acess to acorns, berries, and a variety of grasses. These have been the tastiest deer I have tried. Mulies prefer dryer areas with more sages, brush, chamise, and have a more herbal diet. This locale causes a more robust "Gamey" flavor.

So what I would suggest; is that if you want a tasty meat buck, find a hunting area that has forage that would suggest "grass fed deer". Grass fed beef is superior meat, to non grass fed. Likewise this would relate to any game animal. Where they live is how they will taste. When only hunting for horns, we might forget to ask "how will it taste?" I am no master hunter, but this I have experienced and verified with various other hunters and guides in multiple states.

Mountain mulies if found can be much less gamey, than brush mulies, and a field ranging blacktail can be as gamey as a field mulie. Location, Location, Location

Well thats my first post thanks for listening. 

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3190
Welcome to BGH. Where are

Welcome to BGH. Where are you?

D7Resident's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2012
Posts: 3
BGH

Thank you for welcoming me. I am in the Sierra N.F., near Bass Lake, CA. I am currently hunting D7 Archery right now. Just got back from a morning hunt. Saw lots of good sign, and heard a few deer in the vicinity, but couldn't see them. I'll be back at it in a couple days though. I'll be trying the rattle bag, and some doe scent next. Maybe a grunt too.

 

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