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tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 610
mountain hunting of Whitetails

Lets have a discussion on hunting mountain whitetails.  Where i live there are no soybeans or acorns or farms.  But we do have lots of national forest.  So food plots are out of the question.

What tatics have worked for you?  Do you glass clear cuts or cruise old logging roads?

Another thing that makes it a little harder here in north idaho is the bedding and feeding areas might be a couple of feet apart.

so i was just curious what other mountain hunters are doing?

 

thanks

tim

CVC
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Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3583
I haven't hunted mountain

I haven't hunted mountain whitetails, but I'll weigh in.  At first blush, it seems like you'd hunt them like muile deer.  Spot and then stalk, but after thinking about it I am not sure if that will work.  I guess that I'd try to intercept them between the bedding and food source even if they are close.  Maybe hunt that in the morning and evening and do some still hunting during midday.

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Location: Central Florida
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No mountain's here,but i'd

No mountain's here,but i'd just find a well travel'd area their use'n and just sit back off it an wait...

Ca_Vermonster's picture
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Location: San Diego, CA
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Well, back east in Vermont,

Well, back east in Vermont, some of the biggest bucks were taken in mountainous terrain.  Personally I feel that if you are not near food sources like agricultural crops, you need to find what they are eating.  In the mountains, that's white acorns, beachnuts, etc.  Look for a "bench" area on a hillside that is sort of protected.  Especially when the first couple of cold snaps hit, be ready for them to start hitting the acorns.

Also, I am not sure about Idaho, but back in the northeast, you can find alot of overgrown homesteads up in the hills.  Some of these contains old growth apple and other fruit trees.  Find one of those that's still producing, and you could have found your honey hole. Yes

ecubackpacker's picture
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Ca_V has some good

Ca_V has some good points:"you need to find what they are eating.  In the mountains, that's white acorns, beachnuts, etc.  Look for a "bench" area on a hillside that is sort of protected.  Especially when the first couple of cold snaps hit, be ready for them to start hitting the acorns.

Also, I am not sure about Idaho, but back in the northeast, you can find alot of overgrown homesteads up in the hills.  Some of these contains old growth apple and other fruit trees.  Find one of those that's still producing, and you could have found your honey hole. Yes"

Looks for saddles connecting two valleys or hollows or I think out west they're called coulies(?). A well positioned stand in a saddle will produce if you find the right saddle to hunt.

+1 about the old homesite and apple orchards can be a gold mine.

Good luck! Thumbs up

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 610
Well i walked around in the

Well i walked around in the melting snow, fog, mist yesterday.  couldn't see a dang thing. 

Am i the only mountain whitetail hunter on here?

CVC
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Location: Kansas
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No mountains here in Kansas.

No mountains here in Kansas.

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 610
thanks for the info.  There

thanks for the info.  There is no acorns or beachnuts or anything like that here.  I have killed alot of deer here, 40+ i was just hoping for some tips that are just mountain related.  The rut is kicking in and its, look for the does right now with bucks being close.