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Critter's picture
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Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 3770
Montana I 161 Passes

-Prices of non-resident tags will increase - Deer/elk combo goes from $628 to $897 and deer combo goes from $328 to $527

-The "guaranteed outfitter" tag has been eliminated. ANY NON-RESIDENT hunting in Montana must now draw a tag in the lottery. No tags are guaranteed for outfitters as in the past.

-The former guaranteed outfitter tags - all 5,500 deer/elk combo and 2,300 deer combo, will be placed back into the general drawing pool (where they were prior to 1995). This roughly doubles the size of the general drawing pool.

What this means:
Your non-resident tag in Montana will cost quite a bit more. But if you are a DIY kind of guy, your chances of drawing a tag GREATLY improved. But start saving now. Tying up that kind of money for the draw might be a bit painful if you don't prepare. And if you're an outfitter in Montana, you just took a major hit and might want to pick up another job.

Ca_Vermonster's picture
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That's good to hear.  I

That's good to hear.  I prefer the DIY method, and have always wanted to hunt Montana.  Question though, what is the "Deer combo"?  Whitetail and Muley?  Are you allowed 2 deer, or does that allow you to just take either of them instead of being species specific?

CVC
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I hadn't thought about

I hadn't thought about Montana until this and will now do a little research and will share what I find.  Can you drive to Montana from where you live?  It is definitely doable from Kansas.

Critter's picture
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All Combination licenses

All Combination licenses include a season Fishing license, Upland Bird license, Conservation license, and Hunting Access Enhancement Fee, so it is only one deer.  It would be nice if you could bag both a whitetail and a mulie. 

CVC
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It looks like Montana has

It looks like Montana has lots of public land. 

Access to State Lands

School Trust Lands

There are 5.5 million acres of state school trust lands in Montana. These lands are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) with revenue collected from the use of these lands used to support Montana Schools. All hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities that occur on state school trust land require possession of a State Recreational Use License which is available from all license agents where hunting and fishing licenses are sold. BLM and Forest Service maps are typically the best source for identifying state school trust land.

Remember, only those state lands that are legally accessible via a public road, navigable river, or adjacent federal lands are available for hunting without permission from the adjacent landowner. You must have permission from the landowner before crossing private land to access state or federal lands.

Other State Lands

State Wildlife Management Areas

Montana Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) are owned and managed by the Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks and provide free public hunting opportunities statewide. All WMAs have limitations on the available season of use. Some areas allow camping and motorized use is restricted to designated routes. Hunting on WMAs is open to all resident and nonresident hunters with a valid hunting license and/or permit. Purchase of the State Recreational Use License is not required to recreate at these sites. Contact the appropriate regional office for specific information about a particular area.

Fishing Access Sites

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks owns and manages Fishing Access Sites (FAS) statewide. Generally, FASs provide stream or lake access only. Some sites also allow hunting. You should contact the appropriate FWP Regional Office to check on restrictions before hunting at an FAS.

Montana Department of Corrections

The Montana State Prison Ranch offers big game and bird hunting on 23,000 acres of land managed by the Department of Corrections at Warm Springs near Deer Lodge. For additional information on area restrictions and a detailed map, contact FWP Region 2 Headquarters at (406) 542-5530.

Access to Federal Lands

National Forest Lands

National forests in Montana comprise nearly 16 million acres. Most national forest lands that are legally accessible via a public road, navigable waterway, or adjacent state or federal land are open to hunting. Land use restrictions do apply to some areas so its always a good idea to check in with the local Ranger District Office. Individuals must have permission from the landowner to cross adjacent private land to hunt on National Forest Lands. National forest maps are available from all Forest Service District Offices, or by contacting Forest Service Northern Region Office at (406) 329-3511.

BLM Lands

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages over 8 million acres of mostly range land and some forested land across the state. Most BLM lands that are legally accessible via a public road, navigable waterway, or adjacent state or federal land are open to hunting. You must have permission from the landowner to cross adjacent private land to hunt on BLM land. The BLM sells maps that identify BLM land. Maps are available from all BLM Area Offices, and by contacting the BLM State Office in Billings at (406) 896-5004.

National Refuges and Waterfowl Production Areas

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) manages ten national wildlife refuges in Montana most of which allow hunting during some portion of the season. USFWS also oversees hundreds of waterfowl production areas that provide waterfowl, upland bird, and limited big game hunting opportunities. Hunting opportunities on wildlife refuges are generally quite restrictive and in some cases prohibited altogether. You should contact refuge personnel before hunting on any national wildlife refuge. For general information on the National Wildlife Refuge System in Montana, contact the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge in Lewistown at (406) 538-8706 or follow this link.

US Bureau of Reclamation Lands

The US Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) administers approximately 200,000 acres of land and 100,000 acres of surface water in Montana. Where there is legal public access, BOR managed land is open to hunting, fishing and other recreational activity. Motorized travel is restricted to existing roads.

Access Montana

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Access Montana was created to improve access to state and federal lands and to help reduce the conflicts that arise when sportsmen utilize public lands. Program

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