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Location: Forsyth county,nc.
Joined: 01/27/2008
Posts: 70
Low recoil 12 gauge ammo.

Thanks for all of your feedback about the 20 gauge being too big. I went to my local walmart and they have 2 Mossberg 500's in 20 gauge for 200.09. One has a youth barrel (22"). I could save up and by that, but I found some low recoil 12 gauge ammo to. It is called winlite from winchester. My dad has a Winchester super x 1, semi-automatic. Its about 10 years old but still shooting good. That ammo has half the recoil than other 12 gauge ammo, so ill just shoot it. Here is a link to the ammo, tell me what you think,thanks,nc.hunter.

http://www.ableammo.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=102213

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Location: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Joined: 01/13/2007
Posts: 368
Low recoil 12 gauge ammo.

That WinLite ammo was designed for exactly your situation! Buy a box and try it in your Dads' 12 ga. If the recoil does not bother you, spend your money on more ammo and practice, practice, practice!

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2363
Low recoil 12 gauge ammo.

"My dad has a Winchester super x 1, semi-automatic. Its about 10 years old but still shooting good."

10 years old? That's a young gun!!! That WInchester has at least another 100 years of life left. That's the good thing about shotguns in particular. It's rare to hear of them wearing out, even rarer to see one wear out. You'll be passing that gun onto your great grandkids. Laugh

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Location: Puyallup, WA / Grand Rapids, MI
Joined: 10/24/2007
Posts: 96
Low recoil 12 gauge ammo.

Definitely use your dad's gun. If you save your money right now when you're learning, you can afford to get a better gun down the line. Also, if you wait a few years you won't have to worry about recoil or being too small for a certain gun. When you're saving your money, you'll have time to learn which type of shotgun you prefer.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2363
Low recoil 12 gauge ammo.

Oh, forgot to tell you that a lot of times those low recoil and light target loads don't cycle very well in some semi-autos, gas operated or recoil operated. If you experience failures to eject, or if it re-chambers the spent hull, it is likely due to not enough gas pressure or recoil available to reliably cycle the action. It's more common than people think. Particularly the Remington 11-87 in 3" magnum is notorious for this unreliablility with low recoil ammo or anything lighter than a heavy target load. Many other guns have the same problem.