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Location: texas
Joined: 04/23/2006
Posts: 484
i wish you luck on your

i wish you luck on your upcoming hunt down here.  get ready for some heat.

 

in texas, exotics are not covered under state wildlife laws, other than having to have a valid hunting license while hunting.  so an owner, himself or via instructions to his guides, can do pretty much what he wants with "his" exotics, whether it seems right or not.  i felt sorry for the aoudad, but i was not hunting it, i was just along for the dog training as i was already there.  i do not agree with how it was done, but that means little.

 

i had the bullet fragment weighed.  it was 130.4 grains, so less than half of the original.  i will probably have the brass reloaded with barnes tlc bullets in the future.

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Location: NE NV
Joined: 03/18/2010
Posts: 383
How About A Name?

If possible could you please provide the name of this ranch/owner.  Similar to many of the other hunters here, I look forward to a future hunt for exotics, most likely in Texas.  With the name of this outfit at hand I can make sure that I don't spend any of my money or time supporting his operation.  Anyone who would use his methods to "train" a dog has absolutely no respect for wildlife, the sport of hunting or hunters.  I'll refrain from calling him a hunter; he is simply a harvester of meat and a harvester of other peoples money.

Just so we all remember what I'm ranting about, this sport purposely shot the aoudad in the ass so he could "train" his terrier into a tracking dog.  That he did it in front of you indicates that he most likely has done it before & that he doesn't care if others know what methods he'll use.  I'm at least glad that you killed the animal; I can imagine this "gentleman" using a club on the thing just to reinforce the success of his noble terrier to the dog & to not waste an expensive cartridge on what is only one of his exotics.

I'd be surprised and not a little disappointed in the law enforcement section of Texas Parks & Wildlife if they didn't have anything to say about his intentional wounding of an exotic species, regardless if they are considered private or public property.  The intentional mistreatment of animals is wrong is any circumstance or condition.  I'm sure that Michael Vick felt that using his beagles to train his pit bulls was OK right up until they sent his sorry soul to prison. Regardless of the legalities, there are moral & ethical restraints that obviously do not exist for this "gentleman". 

I don't want to come off sounding like some bunny-hugging, save-the-animal PETA type but this guy needs to know that legal or not his actions are wrong on every level and shouldn't be tolerated by any of the hunting community.  The fact that you don't agree with "how it was done" only means little if you don't do anything about it.  At the very least confronting him with your opinions and not playing along.  If you're not willing to do that much, please provide the information so that others can.

458express's picture
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Joined: 12/02/2010
Posts: 18
Eland

Where in Africa did you hunt this Eland.

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Location: texas
Joined: 04/23/2006
Posts: 484
i will refrain from posting a

i will refrain from posting a name/location for several reasons.

 

the dog in training is a specialty dog, imported by the friend of the owner from germany and is a combination bird/pointer/retriever/tracker.  this is not some run of the mill terrier, and is trained to track a wounded animal by the combined individual scent of the animal with blood.  i have no experience with training hunting dogs, so i have no idea how difficult this particular feat is.  i also do not know if this is how the dog was trained in germany before coming here. we are trained to hunt cleanly and this seems cruel.  but, how does a mother cat teach her young to hunt?  they bring tired or wounded prey for the cubs to practice on.  nature can be messy.

 

one thing many people do not know about the exotic business is that it is subject to many whims in government and regulation, especially CITES.  if a particular animal changes cites classification and moves up a category due to problems in its home range, then trying to manage the regulatory requirements for a smaller hunting operation becomes unfeasable, and thus keeping all those animals becomes a liability.  a while back, barasingha deer were popular exotics to hunt.  they were reclassified to cites 2 and amazingly all the herds in the south magically disappeared as they were no longer economically viable.  the same is likely to happen to the scimitar horned oryx if the appeal to delist it does not go through.  it will not be economically viable to keep them and they too will disappear by magic.  this is a business and not everyone is a bill gates that can afford to feed hundreds of animals merely to enjoy looking at them.  is it right or wrong?  everyone will have a different opinion on the whole subject.  it has been reported that there are more scimitars in texas than across its historical range in africa/middle east.  just because they have killed off all their own, i do not think cites should apply here where the herds thrive due to management, which is tied to economics.  the same principles apply to africa:  make the species valuable to the natives and they will control poaching and excess use to maintain viable herds for hunting and viewing as it benefits them and they are helped in spite of crop damage.  it is all business unfortunately.

 

this eland was shot in texas, so i could eat it here.  i have not been able to get back to africa recently, sad to say.

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