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Location: VIRGINIA
Joined: 09/24/2003
Posts: 43
Hunting Handguns

I really want to get into handgun hunting and I'm looking to buy a handgun in the near future. The problem is, I'm having a hard time trying to decide what I want. My first choice was a .357 probably in the a Ruger Blackhawk. Since you can get .38spl ammo pretty cheap I could practice with it alot but I'm not sure about the 357 on deer. Another choice would the the 44 mag. No question about killing power but ammo cost is pretty high and I want something I can shoot alot. My third choice is a T/C Encore. I already have a Encore rifle and I can just take off the rifle stock and buy a pistol grip, barrel and forearm. For the Encore I was thinking either a 243, 25-06, or 7mm-08. Recoil isn't really an issue, I have shot plenty of handguns up to a 44mag and recoil doesn't bother me, but I will just be turning 21 this summer and my father isn't a real big handgun person so I did't have any handguns in my house other than a couple of 22's so this will be my first handgun purchase. What do you all think my best bet would be.

mcb
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Location: North East Ohio
Joined: 11/05/2003
Posts: 32
Hunting Handguns

Any of those guns you suggest would be fine handguns for deer hunting. I went with a Ruger Blackhawk in 357 magnum with a 6 1/2 inch barrel. Its a very accurate gun and a very strong action. As you mention you can shoot 38 specials in it for cheap practice. You can also switch to the 9 mm cylinder that comes with it and shoot even cheaper ammo. The 9mm cylider was horribly inaccurate but still for plinking it is cheap to feed. There is also quite a bit of accuracy difference between 38 specials in my and 357 Magnums. The gun deffinitly like 357 Magnum cartridges the best. At fifty yards I can keep them on a 5 inch spot over a rest.

Just my $0.02
mcb

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Joined: 12/27/2003
Posts: 20
Hunting Handguns

sounds like you need to start doing your own reloading....its fun and cheap. check out ebay they have some good presses on there cheap. you will probably spend some cake to get started but after that your golden..

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Location: Wisconsin
Joined: 12/26/2003
Posts: 20
Hunting Handguns

My personal choice :Ruger Super Redhawk SS with a mild scope and hand loads.Had it rested ,shooting a fist size pattern at 100 yds. We didnt have a pull scale so we used a fist as a measure.I was impressed with the accuracy.This was just shootin out the back door,not at the range.

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Location: VIRGINIA
Joined: 09/24/2003
Posts: 43
Hunting Handguns

I would love to get into reloading but I am a full time student, have a part time job, a full time girl friend, and would rather hunt and fish than sleep so I really don't have the time or money right know. It's going to take me untill the summer as it is to save up enough money, I'm just trying to figure out how much I'm going to need. I always get atleast one new gun a year and this is going to be the one for this year. My next handgun is going to be given to me. I am going into the State Police academy this fall.

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Joined: 01/13/2004
Posts: 39
Hunting Handguns

You can often find Super Blackhawks for around $350. Short stiff barrels like the ones you usually find for that price will generally shoot well if they are in good shape.
If you don't know what good shape is, then go to a shop and look at some brand new barrels to get an idea.
.44 mag ammo can be had for cheap if you buy 500 or more rounds at the time. You can kill a deer with the stuff if you're really strapped for cash. I did it a couple of times back in my college days. I'm not recommending that you hunt with the cheap UMC-esque loads. I'm just saying that it is possible. I do not think I'd have attempted it with a .357.
If you have good eyes you don't need a scope, or even a long barrel. Just lots of practice. Most of the skill in shooting a handgun is in trigger control. Dry firing at the screw on a light switch is free. Wax bullets at super small targets is nearly free.
A Lee hand press kit and cast bullets is a cheap way to get into rolling your own. The kit comes with everything you need except cartridge components for less than $60 NEW. It fits in an oversized shoe box. The press and cartridge components for 500 hundred rounds could be had for 130 or so. Thats about 14 a box the first time and half that the second.
If you do go with a single-action to keep the cost down, then keep in mind that it does make a noise when you cock the hammer. Deer can hear that at close range. Some guys use a triangular block of wood and an elastic strap to make them feel safer when sitting in a stand with a cocked revolver.
Anyway, good luck & pin 'em thru the shoulders.

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