8 replies [Last post]
Offline
Moderator
Joined: 01/27/2002
Posts: 7916
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

May 2007 Feature Article:

A Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US Border

There was a time when hunters didn't have to think twice about transporting game and firearms across the Canada/US border. Unfortunately, those days are gone forever.

Now, more onerous firearms laws, fear of spreading game-borne diseases, and post 9-11 security concerns have made crossing the border with firearms, trophies, or game meat far more complex. Here's a quick run down of what a traveling hunter needs to know. Read more...

Please use this area to post comments or questions about this feature article.

Offline
Moderator
Joined: 12/03/2005
Posts: 1691
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

I don't believe the article mentioned it but some folks assume that since paperwork(Passports ,permits etc) are in order, then they are bestowed with a God Given Right to enter a foreign country.. Not at all, many folks are "turned back" because of smart remarks,attitude etc. No reason is necessary and no explanation has to be given. Nobody to appeal too. And it happen, regardless of which direction you're going....

Offline
Location: Ontario
Joined: 04/02/2007
Posts: 26
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

That's quite true. I guess a lot of us just assume that when you cross a border you keep your mouth shut, speak when spoken to, and mind your Ps and Qs.

Offline
Joined: 05/20/2007
Posts: 4
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

Steve Galea is a gifted outdoor writer. I truly enjoy his articles. That said I'm concerned with the negative message in this one. As an Alberta-based professional outfitter/guide I bring loads of hunters in each year spring and fall. None of my hunters have ever had a problem bringing firearms into Canada or taking them back home. Its really as simple as having the paperwork in order. In most cases this is a single form that can be printed from the web and then presented when they pass through customs. Every one of my guests says its no hassle at all.

... just wanted to set things straight so potential visiting hunters don't get the idea that it's all doom and gloom.

Offline
Joined: 05/21/2007
Posts: 2
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

Hello Kevin,

First, thanks for the kind words. I enjoy your writing too.

I didn't mean to send a negative message and I was a little surprised to hear it translated that way. In doing my research, I was actually impressed by how easy things are if you do your homework and know what it is expected of you before crossing. It is more complex than it used to be though.

I suppose I was just paranoid about being thorough and, in doing so, I guess I pared it down to the facts I had researched, without editorial comment to put them in perspective. For that, I apologize.

So, to set the record straight, you are absolutely right. For most people, there's nothing difficult about crossing the border. A little prep time is wise and you need to be up to date on what customs allows across the border for the jurisdiction you are hunting in and returning to. Though these are generally reasonable allowances, they are subject to change depending on many factors such as disease outbreaks and political decisions.

These regulations shouldn't stop anyone enjoying a trip of a lifetime, north or south of the border. People should just be aware they exist and prepared to comply by them.

It's not fun -- paperwork never is -- but, for the most part, it's not much more than an inconvenience. Sorry, if I inadvertently portrayed it as otherwise.

Offline
Joined: 05/20/2007
Posts: 4
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

Thanks Steve. I appreciate your clarification.

You did indeed write a thorough article - thank you - it's something that needs to be brought to our attention. Times have changed especially since 9/11, and as a result we need to put up with a bit more hassle. Thankfully, to date its just a bit of paperwork and a small fee. Pray that this doesn't change for the worse.

If you're ever in Alberta, give me a shout.

Kevin

Offline
Joined: 05/21/2007
Posts: 2
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

Hey Kevin,

Next time I'm out that way I'll do that. I've always wanted to duck hunt in the prairies. I've hunted deer in Sask and trapped pheasants in the eastern part of Alberta to bring back to Ontario for reintroduction. Loved both places.

expatriate's picture
Offline
Location: Arizona
Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3206
Hunter's Guide to Crossing the Canada-US...(feature article)

I had to go through this when I moved up here to AK. I'd done all the research, had all the forms done in advance, and after driving a couple thousand miles found myself at the Sweetgrass border in NW Montana. I walked in and presented my carefully filled out paperwork to the clerk. She reviewed them, and then to my surprise, said, "This one can't come in."

"What?" I asked. I looked where she was pointing, and she had identified my son's Model 94 .30-30. "Why not?" I inquired.

"Because the barrel is only 16 inches long," she replied, "and it has to be 18 inches."

A moment of panic swept through me, as I contemplated the logistics of turning around, going far enough into Montana to find a dealer to ship the rifle, etc. But then I thought no -- I knew I had it figured out. I took the paperwork back and dug through it, studying the regs the Canadians so conveniently publish on the forms. I found what I was looking for, and held up the form for her.

"The 16 inch rule applies to semi-autos," I said, "and this rifle is a lever action."

She grumbled a bit at that point, and said a little curtly that she'd have to take it up with her supervisor. She eventually came back and approved it, but wasn't near as friendly. I got the impression that we Americans aren't supposed to figure this stuff out.

I did find it interesting, though, that of all the American and Canadian agents at the border, it was the Canadians decked out in body armor -- and they're the liberals with the gun laws to keep them safe.

A final note, though -- it's a good idea to stop at the American side and fill out a form certifying your ownership of the firearms before you enter Canada. If you don't, then US customs has no positive proof that you owned the firearms prior to leaving the US, and can treat them as being imported.

Location: Oregon
Joined: 06/13/2009
Posts: 2
crossing into Canada for hunting

I am wondering what, if any, the rules are regarding the number of hunting guns per person ? I will be traveling to B.C. via truck and 2 of the group will fly in and be picked up by me. Am I allowed to bring their firearms for them ? Is there additional paperwork to acquire and fill out ?

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
Hunting In Canadasc8721105/09/2006 17:09 pm
Border crossing infohunter251307/31/2013 20:25 pm
KFC Canada gives in to PETA demandsWhelland506/05/2008 05:21 am
I want to hunt Wolf in CanadaHunt Okanogan003/27/2011 00:53 am
big game huntingsupermike80005/03/2006 14:07 pm