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How much technology can hunting handle

When I was introduced to hunting it was kept simple.
We picked and area, set a camp, and started walking the terrain.
Calibers such as 300 savage, 308 win, 30-06, 270 win, 7mm mauser, 300 H&H, 338 WM, 300WM, 7mmRM were the standard everyday rounds seen in camps. A few hunters carried the Weatherby's or a round they called a wildcat.
We almost always took game. Never had a problem with a game thief. Knew the local game warden. If you pulled into an area that already had a camp, you moved down to give each other some space.

Nowadays, you have special clothing. Special scents.Special vehicles that run around making noise and tearing up the hill sides. Hunters camping on top of each other and shooting a round that produces enough energy to drop an Elk at 600yds. Now they want to start placing cameras on game trails to spot game.
Where is it going to end. When does it stop being a sport.

Does anyone else have any thoughts on this.

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How much technology can hunting handle

When I was introduced to hunting it was kept simple. We'd go find our own flint, then knap some points, and with some good sinew bind it to a reasonably straight tree branch. We'd get a band of guys together and hope to get in range so that we could stab a beast without it goring you in the process.

Then came along these turkies that use atlatls. You know that can't be fair, I mean a guy can throw a spear sooooo much further with one those things. Buffalo ain't gotta chance with those atlatls!

Then came along these dudes that rode horses. Can you believe it, riding beasts to kill beasts! That can't be fair, stupid buffalo don't even know to be afraid of a horse, plus the horse can run down a buffalo and a hunter packing an atlatl can really ram home a spear. Hunter's are just going to pot.

Don't even get me started on those flint-lock "hunters". It ain't fair chase I tell ya!

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How much technology can hunting handle

A point well made.

I'm really looking forward to getting one of those new Winchester Repeating Arms' cellular remote satelite guided Laser Fasers.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Technology is what humans do. That's our gift. Cheetahs use their speed; lions use stealth and strength; we use our brains to develop new technologies. And make no mistake that the invention of the bow and arrow was a technological advancement far more significant than the invention of the trail cam or night vision goggles!

The question then becomes, what criteria do we use to judge each new technology? How do we decide if this is the technology that goes over the line and takes away "fair chase?"

Most hunters would agree that using a night vision scope is unfair to deer, elk, and other such night-feeding animals. Most hunters seem okay with the use of a trail cam to pattern these same animals. Why is one okay and the other over the line? Is it the fact that the former gives us a huge edge in actually killing the animal, while the latter only gives us more knowledge of where and when to find the animal?

I don't know. Call me confused on this whole issue.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Scents and camo have been around almost as long as humans have been hunting other critters for survival.
Anyone who has watched the Discovery Channel or TLC has seen the cave paintings of humans with animal hides draped on their backs while stalking some game animal.
I personally have very few "hi tech" devices that I use for hunting. Other than my truck, my Rifle and scope are about as "hi tech" as I get and believe me, there aint much about my truck that is "Hi tech". I did purchase a "Gamefinder" heat sensor thingie once but it really dont help none, and I have a couple of the old fashioned "TrailTimers" that uses a string strung across a trail as a trip for a clock to let me know what time an animal has used a certain trail. That has helped tremendously.

With todays crowded and short hunting seasons I can understand someone wanting to use sone device that will save time and find productive areas to hunt before actually sitting on an area.
Here in Florida we have close to 3 months of Deer season so time is not a factor. Other areas of the country have much shorter seasons.

Folks hunt for different reasons. I enjoy the hunt and being in the woods and not the result of the hunt. Some folks enjoy the kill and must have that to enjoy the hunt, for them there will never be too much "hi tech" advantage.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Its confusing because usually popular opinion on matters of fair chase are driven by emotion rather than logic. Contradiction reins.

If a new technique does not in any way torture an animal prior to or during the hunt, I'm liable to find it acceptable. Admittedly that is a very broad brush, but it is about the only "bed rock" that I've been able to find in what is otherwise a debate largely based on subjective values.

There are grades of huntings. Purists like to make life as hard as possible and then "prevail" over the elements, others like to go to a high fence ranch and shoot one previously picked out.

The purist method is usually harder, but I oppose the evangelist hunters that believe that if your not making your hunt "hard", like them, that somehow your method of killing game should be outlawed. Admittedly, some forms of hunting are not really even hunting at all, but just organized, planned killing. However, organized-planned killing of animals is not in and of itself inherently wrong, if it is then you must be pure vegan, otherwise how could you eat a big-mac and fries, because the process that brought you that meal is nothing more than planned-organized killing of animals.

Furthermore, hunters best beware of factionalizing over fair chase. Fair chase very well could be the sword that animal-rights activist uses to break the back of all hunting. Divide and conquer: divide over fair chase, conquer by weaking collective voting power. Don't believe me? Look at issues surrounding baiting.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Interesting replies, as yet.
As with most every other topic, there are probably as many views of what a hunt is as there are views on the 270 vs 30-06.
I live most everything in life with the philosophy of. "Keep it simple".

Wake up and smell the coffee. Driving through a hunting ground on a noisy ATV and disrupting anothers hunt because I can, is damn selfish and has very little to do with hunting and a lot to do with lack of regard.

I've never hunted in the deep south, mid west or the east coast. The methods seem to be quite different than what I'm accustomed to. Setting a single cam on a game trail would probably get some great pictures for the album. As far as locating game for a hunt. I fail to see the need. I've located deer and elk trails almost every year in several of the westen states. It would take a whole bunch more than one cam to keep track of game movement out here. Once you've found a herd it gets easier. But I've never been able to figure out where their going to be from one day to the next. A general idea wouldn't work very well with a stationary cam
During the spring and summer months here in Washington. The elk, more so than the deer, graze along with the cattle in the pastures. Come fall their headed off to safer ground. It would take a very devoted person, with a whole bunch of extra time, to figure out which game trail they were going to place their one and only cam on. Then again, almost all of my hunting has been done in the vast western states. I have yet to find it neccessary to use any thing but wit to locate game and have had some very enjoyable hunts.

Muzzle breaks. Why would you need a muzzle brake on a gun that is going to be used in the lower 48? Because they make them? These critters have been hunted with rifles and muskets that produce less energy than these wizzbangs for 100's of years. With great success. There isn't a game animal in the lower 48 that can't be taken with a rifle in the 30-06 family of cartridges.

Hunters in the field. Several years back, I was standing on the top of a ridge in one of our western state. With the aid of my eyes only, no optics. I counted 27 blaze orange vests in the hills below me and saw 7 deer. I could watch the deer evading the hunters. I can only imagine what could have happened if anyone of them had been successful but, not dropped the deer on the spot. Some of these orange vests weren't 200 yds from each other and as little as a stones throw from dirt roads. Are there just to many hunters or are we getting lazy. Easiest access with the least work. I've seen these situations in every state I've been to. The exception being Nevada. Which happens to be the best mule deer hunting I've ever done.
The times do change and new innovation come to be. Because a method or an idea or ? worked or works. Does that neccessarily mean that it's a good idea to utilize. Because I happen to live in a period of technological wonder. Does that mean that the technology is an advancement. Couldn't the possibility be that the technology is costly rather than beneficial. If every idea was a good one. It would be a simple world to live in.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Well, I think you've probably hit the nail on the head, bitmasher. What constitutes "fair chase" is almost entirely subjective, and that means we each have our own standards and that no one else's is really "right" or "wrong."

I grew up in Nebraska, where a fairly "Western" sense of what constitutes fair chase exists. Then, in 1982, I moved to Florida. Down there--at least at that time--they organized massive drives and used dogs to hunt deer. When I first saw it my reaction was "Good God! How can they even call this hunting!?!"

I realize now that I was just reacting based on my own prejudices and from my own perspective. It was a legal and culturally acceptable way for them to hunt, so who am I to say it was "wrong?"

And I think your point about planned killing is a good one, too. As long as the animal is killed in a humane fashion, does it really matter how hard the hunt was? Isn't that up to each hunter to decide for him or herself? After all, there is almost no one left in the United States who NEEDS to hunt to feed himself or his family. Hunting, these days, is done for the sport. And, as with all sporting activities, only the person doing the activity can decide if they find it "sporting."

Interesting discussion. Thanks for bringing it up, fuzzybear. It has helped me to clarify some of my own muddled thoughts about this.

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How much technology can hunting handle

Are we talking technology or morality?

Wouldn't technology be a tool and morality a value.

Morality. If you have to question your reasons. Don't do it.

Technology. A tool that can or may be used.

Does technology constitute a change in morality ? If so, maybe technology should be questioned. Not the hunter. Those marketing boys will sell anything to make a buck. Boys and their toys. I remember when you could buy your own personal pet rock. Great marketing scheme. It's called deception or trickery.

The choices are an individuals own assessment. Choose wisely and with caution. It may become very costly.

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How much technology can hunting handle
fuzzybear wrote:
Are we talking technology or morality?

The advance of technology forces questions about what is right and wrong, and therefore are not mutually exclusive. The greatest debates in society usually come when a technology advances to the level that it forces reassessment of the human condition. Examples: Nuclear energy (think atomic weapons), discovery that the Earth revolves around the Sun (big deal at the time), Stem cell research.

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