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Joined: 09/17/2005
Posts: 58
how much???????

ok i have a question who in the hell can aford to hunt anywhere that's guided ? looking around and man $2000 to hunt white tail does that come with a new 4x4 atv. i'm sorry but i think no offense to anyone but are you dumb? that's alot of money when you can buy an elk for 250 dollars or a cow for 700 . maybe i'm just poor or jelous. oh also you never see pictures of guy with gun that aren't scoped any more? hey just looking for other peoples opions and not trying to start a fight. Confused

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Location: Rochester WA.
Joined: 04/27/2005
Posts: 146
how much???????

You make a good point.but people who can pay that kind of money( without getting a divorce)proabably like to hunt with way less people to deal with and to know they are almost guarenteed a deer. Perfiribaly a nice buck. I dont do guided hunts for the main reason of knowing i can get one by my self for the price of tags, ammo, gas, and food. 8)

I dont mean to offend anyone who does guided hunts. If you have the money and time do what you got to do.

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Location: Middle Tennessee
Joined: 08/25/2005
Posts: 409
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If I could afford to go on a guided whtetail hunt or any hunt for that matter I would. It is where there is a good breeding pool has been managed and it is still fair chase. Sometimes guided hunts are the only way to go if you dont know the area.

Offline
Joined: 09/17/2005
Posts: 58
how much???????

so i don't get the know the area thing though. it's not like you will go back the next year to the same spot and hunt or in the same area becuase the outfitter owns the land. so to me that's not a good point.

cowgal's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 03/10/2002
Posts: 1787
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Many outfitters guide on public land, especially in the western states. So using a guide in unknown territory does help in learning more about the area. Our national forests are huge out here, and many folks that have not hunted in such a large forested mountainous area are wise to go with a guide for their first time out, or at least a friend that knows the area.

I say if a person can afford a guide/outfitter, why not? Though I have not hired a guide myself, I wouldn't mind trying a hunt in an area of the country that's new to me. A guide would be fantastic!

Its all a matter of priorities. Not everyone that hires a guide is rich. We all choose to spend our money in different ways. My husband has gone with guides on fishing trips in new areas (and other countries). BTW, we're just plain old working folks and it takes him a year to save up for one of his "special" guided fishing trips. He hasn't regretted any trips or the cost. He feels the knowledge a local person has provided to him, has always been worth it and he learned a lot from them, and about the area.

saskie's picture
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Location: West Carleton, Ottawa, Canada
Joined: 12/23/2002
Posts: 1264
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From a "business" perspective there are a lot expenses for the outfitter. First off is room and board for the clients, and possibly staff. The grocery bill for 3 square for a dozen or so men who've been active outdoors all day is pretty steep, and trust me: if the food aint good - ain't nobody happy.

Ohers are not so obvious. First is his time, not just during the actual hunt, but all year. Clients paying that kind of money have expectations of better-than average success. The outfitter (assuming he's a decent, competent fellow - and most are) will have invested countless hours scouting ahead of time. He will know every inch of his area and have a good idea of typical deer movement patterns within it for a given set of conditions. This won't be something that is accomplished on the weekend before deer season, it will involve hundreds of hours of dedicated effort.

There will be taxes/upkeep on any land the outfitter owns, and probably also access fees to ensure exclusive access for any private land he uses. Once again, imagine if you were the client, paying big bucks and some other non-client guy was crowding your spot...you wouldn't be very happy.

In the case of whitetail there will likely be stand/blind to set up ahead of time, and these will have to be top quality...he can't afford to have his clients "making do". And there will likely be at least 2-3 or these per client. Firewood to gather and care for...refridgeration costs for client's meat, butchering...

Add in purchasing equipment like a couple trucks/ATV to haul out game or transport hunters, maintenance and operating expenses on vehicles, wages for cooks, housekeeping (if required), wranglers, hired hands, skinners etc...and above all INSURANCE (anyone want to take a guess at what kind of liability premiums are involved in hunting outfitting?), marketting and advertising...and as always a gazillion nickle and dime items that add up to a couple hundred in no time flat

The list goes on and on and on.... And at the end of the day, after all that effort, yes, there is profit margin (which hopefully won't be swallowed up by say...an unpexpected gas spike after the hunts are booked and deposits paid, or a sudden change in the exchange rate for cross-border booked hunts.)

After all, he has to eat too.

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Joined: 09/17/2005
Posts: 58
how much???????

oh i understand all of that but to me it just seems like the lazy way out. you talk about blinds, gas, transport. i do all of that for my self, scout , knowing the land, isn't that what hunting is all about. so some people are just lazy then? Becuase they pay you to do all the stuff hunting is about.

cowgal's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 03/10/2002
Posts: 1787
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You're missing the point up north. Everyone I know does exactly what you stated in your post --- in their own back yards! People generally only hire guides when they go into unfamiliar territory, it has nothing to do with laziness.

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Location: Rochester WA.
Joined: 04/27/2005
Posts: 146
how much???????

I have to fall on up norths side. when i got to easern washington or some where i dont now i'll have a map, but i just get out there and figure it out. i'll ask around get permission to hunt on privite property and just go. I do have to say thought if i had the extra money, and time to go some where i've never gone i would probably hire a guide. think it just depends on the situation. Alien

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Joined: 10/10/2005
Posts: 1
how much???????

First off I want to say that I don't want to offend anyone. I couldn't afford to do it the easy way (a guided hunt) I've never been on one so I can't comment on what there like. My feeling is the guy who goes out on his own, builds a stand, puts the time in for scouting and doing all the other stuff feels like he actually accomplished something in the end just my two cents

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Location: Arkansas
Joined: 05/04/2003
Posts: 33
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Guided hunts on open land (meaning no canned hunts) are a fantastic opportunity to hunt in a beautiful, new place with a chance to harvest your game within a short period of time.
You are paying for a great hunting experience and the knowledge of someone who knows the area. After all, once the animal is within range the guide has done his work. It's up to you to make the shot.

I've spent a lot of money on family vacations where the closest I was to the hunting woods was 35,000 feet in the air. Some of my best hunting memories were of hunts where I didn't fire a shot. I suppose it all depends on what each person requires of their hunting experience Big smile .