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hunter25's picture
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Location: Colorado western slope
Joined: 11/13/2009
Posts: 3021
How many of you came from non hunting families?

I was fortunate and was brought up in a pretty strong hunting culture. It actually seems to get stronger every year and my children are far ahead of where I was at the same age.

But I'm mostly interested in how many of you did not start out that way and how you did get started.

Thanks for any replies.

jaybe's picture
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Location: S.E. Michigan
Joined: 10/19/2010
Posts: 817
Well, since you're looking

Well, since you're looking for ANY replies, here's mine.

My dad hunted rabbits, squirrels and deer. He taught me how to shoot and took me rabbit hunting after giving me his old single shot 20 gauge shotgun. I have since passed this on to my son.

I remember going out to my maternal grandparent's farm on Thanksgiving morning and hunting with my grandfather, my dad, an uncle, a cousin and a couple of great uncles. It was not uncommon for the combined hunting party to get 20-30 rabbits back in those days.

My dad also took me deer hunting the first few years before I started hunting with my buddies. He always wore those same red and black checkered wool hunting pants and a "Mackinaw" coat that he had bought many years before. He moved to Florida and quit hunting before blaze orange was required.

I'm thankful every time I even think about hunting that my dad got me started down that path. It has provided countless hours of being outdoors, learning more about God's wonderful creation, and also putting some real quality meat on our family's table over the years. Thumbs up

 

hunter25's picture
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Location: Colorado western slope
Joined: 11/13/2009
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Although Orange was required

Although Orange was required when I started hunting I go remember a lot of those old black and red jackets hanging around the shed and farm. I was born in Michigan but we moved and my first hunts were in northern Wisconsin. If I remember correctly that the first year or two flourescent yellow was also legal but that didn't last very long. Someone said it lost it's glow and started to look like a deer in low light but not sure on that one.

Hey, do you guys still have to pin that license plate in the middle of your back? I remember i got sent home from school for taking that huge safety pin from my dads jacket and bringing it with me in 3rd grade.lol

groovy mike's picture
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I have a mixed hunting background.

I have a mixed hunting background.  My granddad on my Mom’s side was an avid hunter.  He took a deer  every year as did his son (my uncle) but he never even saved the antlers let alone displayed them.  He was strictly a meat hunter.  He also loved coon hunting but it was an entirely money driven hobby for him.  He hunted raccoons when the price of fur made it worth while and did not hunt when the price for coon hides dropped.  My dad was raised in town and had no hunting experience.  He was not against hunting, but it was not his thing.  He had no interest at all.  I was actually ANTI-Hunting as a kid – seeing no reason to hurt those harmless little animals.  I did however love history and like many young boys read avidly of soldiers and adventurous explorers including the exploits of our founding fathers on the frontier.  I developed a fondness for firearms.  When I turned 18, I spent a week’s pay to buy my first rifle.  I wanted to use it and signed myself up for a hunter safety class then spent the next four years teaching myself to hunt strictly as an excuse to own rifles.  The challenge of stalking the wily whitetail hooked me and by the time I bagged my first buck when I was 22, deer hunting had gone from a 2 weekend per year attempt to an obsession that had me in the woods every spare moment that deer season was open.  After that I branched out into muzzle loading just to extend my season.  Then turkey hunting and waterfowling just to be able to hunt when deer season is closed.

expatriate's picture
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Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3207
How many of you come from non-hunting families?

I grew up on a farm with a house full of guns.  Dad always kept a brick of .22 on his closet shelf and generally enough shotgun shells to keep us busy.  When we'd run out of ammo, he'd put on a show of grumbling a bit, and then put another box on the shelf.  There's probably enough lead in the ground around that farm to qualify as a Superfund site.  Dad taught me how to hunt squirrels, and Dad, my brother and I learned how to hunt whitetails with the neighbors.  Thankfully, some of them through their bad examples taught us things like the importance of not wearing a white hat on a deer drive.

Decades later, I look at my Dad and how he hunted, and realize he wasn't much of a hunter in a lot of things I learned later.  My brother hunted muleys with him in Idaho a few years ago and complained about how Dad always went into the woods smelling so strongly of Tide and Safeguard.  But he did teach us a lot -- maybe not so much in technique, equipment, or fieldcraft, but at least in enthusiasm, determination, dedication and enjoyment of the outdoors.

arrowflipper's picture
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NONE

Great question..... I came from a family with zero hunting experience.  My dad had never been hunting before I took it up.  My mom's family were never hunters either.  So how in the world did I become such an avid hunter?  We didn't even have a gun in the house.  I had to beg my dad for a BB gun and then a 22.  After I shot my first deer, my dad actually borrowed a rifle and went out himself.  He saw deer on several occasions but never popped a cap.  I'm not sure he could have killed a deer if they opportunity had presented itself. 

But he did support my hunting and encouraged me to go out.  My mom fixed the venison and our family ate it.

I brought my family up differently.  I have three children, one boy and two girls.  My son is now an avid hunter and one of my daughters loves to hunt.  Of my six grandchildren old enough to hunt, five of them have harvested deer.  If I'm still around when the next three get old enough, you can bet I'll take them out as well.

I believe hunting is a heritage we NEED to pass on to our children and grandchildren.

expatriate's picture
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Location: Arizona
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Posts: 3207
How many of you came from non hunting families?

Some of my best memories were generated hunting with my son.  The last was when I got him his first bear.  My stand was over 100 miles north of us in AK, almost to the Yukon River.  It took about two and a half hours one way to get to the stand, which meant a number of trips up there to put in the stand, refill bait, etc before we ever saw bears on the trail cam.  Then there was the time spent sitting on the stand through the night hoping to see bears.  Him getting the bear was priceless, as was the experience of scaring off other bears coming into the site while we were trying to skin and cut up his bear.  But even better was the hours we spent driving back and forth to the site, and the hours we spent on the stand trying to stay warm and fighting off mosquitoes.  You simply can't put a value on that kind of one-on-one time with an 18 year old.

Topgun 30-06's picture
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Location: Allegan, MI
Joined: 12/11/2010
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Simple answer, short and

Simple answer, short and sweet---Dad!!!  Michigan hasn't had "license plates" for our backs in a good 20 years or more.  We just carry whatever license/tag we need with us and we are also supposed to have the ID with us that was used to purchase that license.

Ca_Vermonster's picture
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Location: San Diego, CA
Joined: 07/27/2007
Posts: 5743
Hunting throughout both

Hunting throughout both families.

My Dad grew up in Western Pennsylvannia, with 6 kids, and lived on a farm.  His Dad was a coal miner, as well as the family farm.  Hunting provided just another way of putting meat on the table.

My Mother's side was also all about hunting.  They are from northern Maine, and all still hunt.  My wife, who is from the city and totally foreign to the hunting scene, gets a kick out of how we can sit around the table, playing cards, just talking about this animal, or that animal, or what we shot/caught.

It's pretty funny.

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